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1.
Estudios De Historia De Espana ; JOUR(1):78-94, 24.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101048

ABSTRACT

On July 16, 2020, the most relevant Spanish authorities gather in the Armory Square of the Royal Palace to pay a solemn tribute to the thousands of victims that the COVID-19 pandemic had occurred in Spain. This is the first non-denominational State tribute held in the country after the restoration of democracy in 1978. Within a context of social instability caused by the pandemic and with the first coalition government of left-wing parties since the Second Republic, there is a reactualization of the ritual with the celebration of this State tribute to the victims of COVID. This essay-style study aims to delve into the concept of political ritual, the possibility of creating new rites and its role in modern democracies. In addition, it investigates in depth the official funerals that have occurred in Spain since the approval of the current Constitution, their common features and their particularities. The aim of this article is to highlight the importance of this type of official act to bring society together, legitimize State institutions and influence through political discourse.

2.
Omega (Westport) ; : 302228221134205, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089042

ABSTRACT

This study examined the changing character of the last honours of those who died of COVID-19 in Kashmir and the life experiences of the families of the deceased. A semi-structured interview schedule was used to collect information from 21 participants. Using qualitative data analysis approaches, five key themes were identified vis-à-vis the impact of COVID-19 on burial rituals and customs; effects on bereaved families, shades of grief, bereavement care, community response, and coping with loss. Based on examining the pandemic-induced changes related to customs and rituals around death, the study found that the bereaved family members were in danger of marginalization, economic burdens, psychological traumas, and overall reduced quality of life. This study would be a credible addition to the existing literature on death practices as there is a shortage of research on funeral rituals during the post-pandemic period in Kashmir.

3.
Int J Ment Health Syst ; 16(1): 50, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recovery processes of persons with complex mental health needs take a slow and unpredictable course. Despite the fact that a number of essential building blocks of recovery in this population have been identified (e.g. social relationships, treatment, personal beliefs), the actual process of recovery in persons with complex mental health needs largely remains a black box. The aim of this study was to gain insight into how the recovery processes of persons with complex mental health needs take place, by applying a relational geographical approach and scrutinizing the place-making dynamics of one low-threshold meeting place in Belgium engaging with this group. METHODS: Data collection took place during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic by means of 11 in-depth interviews with different involved actors (service users, staff members, volunteers) and analyzed thematically. RESULTS: Results showed how the daily practice of the meeting place is continuously reproduced through place-making rituals that create an inclusive space of hospitality, are fueled by creative processes and form an indispensable counterweight for service users' mental health needs. CONCLUSIONS: To further open up the 'black box' of recovery in persons with complex mental health needs, it is vital to focus our analytic gaze onto recovery as a dynamic and relational practice.

4.
British Journal of Midwifery ; 30(10):546-553, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2067259

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected teaching for nursing and midwifery academics, as it shifted from face-to-face to online teaching from home. However, their experiences and how this impacted their ability to fulfil their academic roles has not been reported. This study investigated midwifery and nursing academics' working from home experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and how this has impacted their ability to fulfil their academic roles. Methods: A qualitative approach was used for this study, analysing demographics and the answers to open-ended questions from 91 midwifery and nursing academics. Results: Six themes were derived: isolation, loneliness, work rituals, productivity, blurred boundaries and health and wellbeing. Generally, participants reported that they were more organised, focused and efficient, which gave them more time to spend with their families and pets. Most thought that they were more productive at home. However, the working environments for some participants were not ideal, as they were working in their kitchen or dining area, or in 'make-do' offices. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic posed new working challenges for academics, many of whom had worked from home for a few days, but then needed to work from home for extended periods because of lockdowns. Academics reported an overall positive outlook for working from home, as it enabled more family time and more productivity. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of British Journal of Midwifery is the property of Mark Allen Holdings Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
PeerJ Comput Sci ; 8: e1087, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040364

ABSTRACT

Hajj (pilgrimage) is a unique social and religious event in which many Muslims worldwide come to perform Hajj. More than two million people travel to Makkah, Saudi Arabia annually to perform various Hajj rituals for four to five days. However, given the recent outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and its variants, Hajj in the last 2 years 2020-2021 has been different because pilgrims were limited down to a few thousand to control and prevent the spread of COVID-19. This study employs a deep learning approach to investigate the impressions of pilgrims and others from within and outside the Makkah community during the 1442 AH Hajj season. Approximately 4,300 Hajj-related posts and interactions were collected from social media channels, such as Twitter and YouTube, during the Hajj season Dhul-Hijjah 1-13, 1442 (July 11-23, 2021). Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and long short-term memory (LSTM) deep learning methods were utilized to investigate people's impressions from the collected data. The CNN-LSTM approach showed superior performance results compared with other widely used classification models in terms of F-score and accuracy. Findings revealed significantly positive sentiment rates for tweets collected from Mina and Arafa holy sites, with ratios exceeding 4 out of 5. Furthermore, the sentiment analysis (SA) rates for tweets about Hajj and pilgrims varied during the days of Hajj. Some were classified as positive tweets, such as describing joy at receiving the days of Hajj, and some were negative tweets, such as expressing the impression about the hot weather and the level of satisfaction for some services. Moreover, the SA of comments on several YouTube videos revealed positive classified comments, including praise and supplications, and negative classified comments, such as expressing regret that the Hajj was limited to a small number of pilgrims.

6.
The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society ; 12(2):149-165, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030451

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the changes in religious rituals and social relations experienced by members of the Jama’ah Tabligh as a minority group identified as a cluster in the spread of COVID-19 in Wonosobo, Indonesia. The socio-religious changes during the pandemic were not only influenced by the medical dangers of COVID-19 but also by the societal stigma toward groups of sufferers. This article is based on a research conducted in November 2020 using qualitative methods with data collected through interviews and observations. The results of this study indicate that changes in worship behavior carried out by members of the Jama’ah Tabligh in Wonosobo are caused by the negative societal stigma toward the group. Other groups carried out behaviors of repression and expulsion of all members of the Jama’ah Tabligh, a minority group. As a result of the negative stigma, members of Jama’ah Tabligh responded with a more inclusive attitude. Excessive concerns raised by the community are influenced by mitigation efforts carried out by the authorities in a repressive manner. The socio-religious conflicts that have emerged after the pandemic should be a concern for all groups, beyond health and economic recovery.

7.
Relations Industrielles ; 77(1), 2022.
Article in French | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030281

ABSTRACT

Drawing on Goffman's writings, our article looks at how social dialogue evolves when the theater of interactions between unions and employers becomes digital, as was the case following the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on 23 interviews, our article highlights three effects of digital technology on the stage play of union actors: the loss of the theatrical character of speech, the isolation of actors and the desynchronization of their interventions. Our study also concludes that there is an overall impoverishment of backstage exchanges. This article contributes to the literature by showing how the remote mode modifies the power relations between unions and employers as well as the very nature of their relations.

8.
After lockdown, opening up: Psychosocial transformation in the wake of COVID-19 ; : 219-235, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1990561

ABSTRACT

This chapter explores magical thinking and its relation to secular rituals emerging during the COVID-19 pandemic. Historically, cleaning, washing, polishing, whitening, purifying and exploiting the magical powers of soap have been experiences deeply embedded in the imperial economy of domesticity and the colonial configuration of blackness as pollution and dirt. Focusing on UK government's campaign 'Hands, Face, Space', I suggest that the popularisation of a science-based protection ceremony is an invitation to embrace not only scientific reason, but the magic of science too. The latter is approached through a psychoanalytic interrogation of magical thinking. I argue that instead of encouraging magical thinking in relation to scientific-based rituals, in the post-lockdown society we need to find ways of rekindling what the Hungarian anthropologist and psychoanalyst Geza Roheim calls the 'magic principle';a non-psychotic form of magic that does not rely on magical rituals but on the anticipation of being looked after from others. To the magical wish to 'wash our hands to happy birthday', I juxtapose a magical thinking that prompts us to place a demand for care on the external world. It is only through a decolonial approach to psychoanalysis that the psychosocial implications of care and the anticipation for a more caring society can be explored and pursued in the post-pandemic world. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Leisure Studies ; : 1-16, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1972809

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to nationwide lockdowns and rigid measures of social distancing in Denmark. Such a situation provides the unique opportunity to study interruptions in training routines and scrutinise the significance of physical attendance, face-to-face interactions and collective engagement for sport and leisure-time physical activity. Drawing on Randall Collins’ micro-sociological theory of ‘Interaction Ritual Chains’, this article focuses on CrossFit – an activity, which is not only known for members’ high-intensity workouts but also for a tight-knit community. Specifically, we explored how CrossFitters in Denmark made sense of and experienced the changes of their leisure practices throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Semi-structured interviews with 20 CrossFitters recruited from different CrossFit boxes showed that not only activity levels but also emotional energy and group solidarity dropped considerably during COVID-19 as members lacked interactions within the CrossFit boxes which had been crucial for their participation before the pandemic. Notably, new training situations, specifically online workouts, could not replace the highly successful interaction rituals in the CrossFit box, which stresses the significance of face-to-face interactions for continuous leisure-time physical activity. In so doing, this article contributes to discussions about whether online workouts and digitally mediated communities can complement or replace physical training. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Leisure Studies is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Diplomatic Studies ; 18:352-368, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1962536

ABSTRACT

As the realities of the Covid-19 pandemic came into focus in early 2020, diplomats in MFA s worldwide were faced with the prospect of a significant disruption to one of the more ubiquitous rituals of their jobs: the face-to-face meeting. This chapter critically analyses what is lost, and what is gained, when diplomats are deprived of a crucial habitualised practice that is, for many, the foundational activity that describes what it is to be a diplomat, and forced to conduct their interactions virtually through digital technology. Drawing upon anthropology, sociology and political science, this chapter situates face-to-face diplomacy as a ritualised behaviour that allows diplomats to build trust and, in the most successful cases, transform identities. It then turns to the prospects of replicating this process online and analyses the extent to which virtual interaction may serve as a sufficient proxy for physical co-present interaction. It concludes with reflections on the ramifications of the continued pervasiveness of digital technology in diplomacy, with recommendations for MFA s as they navigate the promises and drawbacks of these technologies. © 2022 Marcus Holmes.

11.
J Relig Health ; 61(5): 4260-4281, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1959047

ABSTRACT

At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, government and medical guidelines emphasized social distancing to limit exposure. These guidelines significantly impacted closed religious communities, particularly those opposed to modern technologies, such as Amish and Mennonite communities. How did these religious communities respond to COVID-19 policies in the USA? We draw data from Ohio and Pennsylvania scribe entries published in an Amish/Mennonite correspondence newspaper. While some of these communities altered church rituals to comply with government directives, others maintained communal worship without disruption. Mennonite communities were more likely to conform to guidelines.


Subject(s)
Amish , COVID-19 , Ceremonial Behavior , Humans , Pandemics , Pennsylvania
12.
RELIGACIÓN. Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades ; 6(30), 2021.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1955632

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by COVID-19 was inscribed in our bodies and in our senses. The pandemic represented the reconfiguration of our times, rhythms, processes of subjectivation, socialization, and productivity, even the ways of conceiving the world as the cycles of life and the rituals of death. Although this event is due to biological and epidemiological factors, it has also been established as an operator that has produced discourses, practices, imaginations, and desires, where power flows and organizes new rearrangements in the condition of entropy, social terror, and the pandemic risk. The objective of this article was to analyze the new material and immaterial conditions that were reconfigured in civil society during the pandemic period as coping and resistance mechanisms aimed at safeguarding life in the health emergency condition. The first one delves into the ways in which we reconstitute ourselves as subjects, the relationship and organization of bodies with the habitat, and the emergence of new commercial relationships. In the immaterial dimension, discursive aspects such as discriminatory practices, the generation of new affects and the production of subjectivities are analyzed, such gestures and politicities are oriented to the continuity of the sustainability of life, however, they reveal contradictions, deficiencies, discriminatory processes and distinct types of violence that make up a new aseptic society.Alternate :La pandemia provocada por COVID-19 se inscribió en nuestros cuerpos y en nuestros sentidos. Habitar la pandemia representó la reconfiguración de nuestros tiempos, ritmos, procesos de subjetivación, socialización y productividad, formas de concebir el mundo, así como los ciclos de la vida y los rituales de la muerte. Aunque este acontecimiento se debe en gran parte a factores biológicos y epidemiológicos, también se ha constituido como un operador que ha producido discursos, prácticas, imaginarios y deseos, donde el poder fluye y maquina nuevos reordenamientos a la luz de la entropía, el terror social y el riesgo pandémico. En este artículo se tuvo como objetivo analizar los nuevos condicionamientos materiales e inmateriales que se reconfiguraron en la sociedad civil durante el marco temporal pandémico como mecanismos de afrontamiento y resistencia orientados al resguardo de la vida en la condición de emergencia sanitaria. En la dimensión material se profundiza en las formas en cómo nos reconstituimos como sujetos, la relación y organización de los cuerpos con el hábitat, y la emergencia de nuevas relaciones mercantiles. En la dimensión inmaterial se analizan los aspectos discursivos como las prácticas discriminatorias, la generación de nuevos afectos y la producción de subjetividades. Tales gestos y politicidades están orientados a la continuidad de la sostenibilidad de la vida, sin embargo, desocultan contradicciones, deficiencias, procesos discriminatorios y diversos tipos de violencia que confeccionan una nueva sociedad aséptica.Alternate :A pandemia provocada pela COVID-19 foi inscrita em nossos corpos e em nossos sentidos. Habitar a pandemia representou a reconfiguração de nossos tempos, ritmos, processos de subjetivação, socialização e produtividade, formas de conceber o mundo, assim como os ciclos da vida e os rituais da morte. Embora este evento seja em grande parte devido a fatores biológicos e epidemiológicos, ele também se constituiu como um operador que produziu discursos, práticas, imaginários e desejos, onde a energia flui e maquina novos rearranjos à luz da entropia, do terror social e do risco pandêmico. O objetivo deste artigo era analisar os novos fatores materiais e imateriais condicionantes que foram reconfigurados na sociedade civil durante o período da pandemia como mecanismos de enfrentamento e resistência destinados a salvaguardar a vida na emergência sanitária. Na dimensão material, as formas como nos reconstituímos como sujeitos, a relação e organização dos corpos com o habitat e o surgimento de novas relações mercantis são examinados em profundidade. A dimensão imaterial analisa aspectos discursivos, como práticas discriminatórias, a geração de novos efeitos e a produção de subjetividades. Tais gestos e politizações são orientados para a continuidade da sustentabilidade da vida;contudo, revelam contradições, deficiências, processos discriminatórios e vários tipos de violência que criam uma nova sociedade asséptica.

13.
Sur International Journal on Human Rights ; 18(31):197-208, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1929519

ABSTRACT

This essay aims to reflect on some of the ways in which security surveillance technology has become politicised through race and gender biases, the product of a historical process known as cis-coloniality. This analysis aims to demonstrate, with some urgency, that this type of technology is not neutral and in fact reinforces transgendered racism, under the auspices of "efficiency and security". Rather than providing alternatives for the democratisation of intelligent connected cities, it actually operates as a device for classifying risk, harvesting data and alienating black, poor and transsexual bodies, by widening and reframing the gap between bodies and territories. Technopolitics validate both proof of life and automate experience. They determine gender and circumscribe death movements in cities with hyper-surveillance, thus turning collective life into an image-based ritual, through which the militarisation of urban space and the dynamic of contemporary capitalism itself are amplified.

14.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 878818, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903185

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has put various restrictions on grief rituals. Literature suggests that the restrictions on funerals and grief rituals may increase the chance of developing symptoms of prolonged grief (PG). In this study, we explored the possible impact of the pandemic on aspects of the funeral and grief rituals and examined their relationship with PG symptoms. Method: Bereaved individuals from different countries, who lost a loved one in the year prior to the pandemic (n = 50) or during the pandemic (n = 182), filled in an online questionnaire, including a rating of the impact of COVID-19 restrictions, five aspects of the funeral service, five aspects of grief rituals, and a measurement for PG symptoms. Results: Participants bereaved during the pandemic rated the impact of the restrictions on the experience of the funeral and grief rituals as negative. Nevertheless, no differences were found in attendance and evaluation of the funeral and grief rituals for people bereaved prior to vs. during the pandemic. Attendance and evaluation of the funeral services were related to levels of PG symptoms, whereas the performance and helpfulness of grief rituals were not related to these symptoms. Although not related to PG symptoms, half of the participants used helpful alternative rituals to cope with their loss. Discussion: Our study suggests that bereaved people respond resiliently to the COVID-19 pandemic, for example by creating alternative rituals to cope with their loss. Furthermore, it stresses the importance of looking beyond symptom levels when studying the importance of funeral and grief rituals.

15.
Psychoanalysis Self and Context ; : 12, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1886358

ABSTRACT

When I began writing this paper, I was amid coping with several losses. I had lost a beloved friend and a family member to COVID-19, and though it seemed that we were coming out of the woods in the US, the juggernaut virus was burning through my native country of India, where most of my family lives. As a candidate starting analytic training in 2020, Freud's Mourning and Melancholia was particularly poignant as it lays the foundation for object relations borne out of a process of coping with loss. Freud described mourning as an agonizing process of identification, disinvestment and reinvestment. He emphasized the role of intrapsychic factors in the capacity to mourn. Since then, analysts have countered by writing about the highly social nature of the task of mourning and the importance in grieving of a loving communal embrace. In this paper, I explore one's early experiences with Winnicott's holding environment and transitional phenomena as an explanation of the capacity to mourn. I will extend mourning to another form of loss, namely, transience, i.e., temporariness of time and experience. Finally, I will consider how the developmental achievement of the capacity to be alone is inherent in specific intrapsychic modes of mourning transience and could be extended to intrapsychic capacity to mourn in bereavement. I will explore these ideas with a backdrop of traditional Indian rituals and spiritual practices, which embody and uniquely elaborate other essential Winnicottian features, including paradox, dialectics and the third area.

16.
Journal for the Study of Religion Nature and Culture ; 16(1):127-155, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1883726

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper is to analyse the use of Catholic miraculous images during the Covid-19 pandemic in Italy, focusing on the ways in which they have been used and the related rituals performed, especially involving movement, temporality, and nature. I take a multidisciplinary approach, based on a historical perspective, but enriched by the strong influence of anthropology and semiotics. An interesting focus emerges on the devotional practices, both online and, when possible, in presence, in which the miraculous power of historical images is rediscovered and sometimes re-elaborated in light of contemporary sensibilities. At the same time, the rituals performed by clergy constitute a complex negotiation, with the aim of imploring the miraculous power of the supernatural helper that the image represents. The devotees' idea of a miraculous power involved in the image is itself part of the representation of their power.

17.
Anthropology of the Middle East ; 17(1):8-27, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1875345

ABSTRACT

Throughout the Islamic world, the era of COVID-19 has witnessed controversial changes to highly ritualised traditional Islamic funeral rites. To combat the pandemic in Egypt, the government and Al-Azhar implemented restrictions surrounding group prayer and burial which many Egyptians viewed as impinging on their religious duties as well as on their ability to mourn. Utilising participant observation, interviews, and deductive research, this article explores the social and anthropological ramifications involved in the modification of traditional Islamic burial rituals in the era of COVID-19 and the negotiations involved amongst different actors, looking specifically at cases in Egypt.

18.
Advancing Global Bioethics ; 18:69-105, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1872277

ABSTRACT

This chapter analyzes the resurgence of Covid infections since the second half of 2020. Many countries again are not sufficiently prepared for new waves of the pandemic. While most policy-makers emphasize that their decisions are based on scientific evidence, the fundamental problem is that evidence about effective policy measures is insufficient. Policy decisions need to be taken in a context of uncertainty and unknown risks. Major controversies exist regarding the origin and characteristics of the virus, symptomatology, infectiousness, transmission, distancing, masking, immunity, vulnerability, and the role of animals. In all these cases, scientific facts are lacking, weak, questionable, or contested so that in practice policy decisions are based on value judgments. Interpreting the available evidence and proposing what should be done often involves an ethical point of view. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

19.
Religion ; 52(2):177-198, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1805777

ABSTRACT

This introduction opens a collection of seven articles which investigate how religious communities negotiate demands for physical distance induced by governmental responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in accord with their religious and spiritual aspirations to establish presence and togetherness. Grounded in ethnography and media analysis, our contributors offer studies on Pentecostal healing, Mormon eschatology, Hindu diasporic rituals, Chinese spirit mediums, the virtual Burning Man festival, Sufi sonic meditations, and televised Shia Muslim mourning. These studies collectively demonstrate that in pandemic rituals (1) Media are reflexive and enchanted;(2) The religious sensorium is sticky and lingers in embodied and mnemonic ways even under new circumstances of mediation;(3) Space and time emerge as modular, transposable, condensed, yet expanding. Ritual innovations can provoke new kinds of mediations, sensory engagements, and temporal-spatial arrangements, while revealing continuities with pre-pandemic cosmologies, theologies, liturgies, and social hierarchies, and relying on memories of previous ritual sensory experiences.

20.
Omega (Westport) ; : 302228221085175, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775104

ABSTRACT

This paper considers the way the outbreak of coronavirus and the subsequent lockdown has egregiously impeded the Hindu death ceremonies and mourning rituals in India. It makes a comparative analysis of how Hindu death rituals get renegotiated, modified and reinterpreted across two vastly different regions of India, both of which have their local customs. Whilst death rituals in India are contingent on the deceased's caste, community, class, gender and age, the impediment to the major death rituals creates a central conundrum for all mourners. It results from the substitution of 'sacred' ritual guidelines with new 'profane' ones for the 'disposal' of deceased COVID-19 patients. Departure from many significant pre-liminal rites, specific transition rites, and post-liminal rites has eschatological, ritual and cultural ramifications. The inability to grieve in unison during a Shraddh ceremony denies mourners any scope to quell distressing feelings about mortality which serves as a source of consolation.

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