Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.053
Filter
1.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB26, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031370

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccine hesitancy is common and increasingly relevant in the current medical landscape. Simply based on volume, dermatology practices intersect with the community more than most medical providers. At risk populations for vaccine preventable illnesses are also relatively commonplace in dermatology clinics, as is the practice of injectable therapeutics. Based on these factors, we hypothesize that dermatology clinics have a unique opportunity to positively impact the public health of the population they serve through vaccine administration. Methods: From May until August 2021, 220 patients received a single or two-dose series of the COVID-19 vaccine at their local dermatology clinic as part of a vaccine outreach initiative. A 5-question survey was provided to these patients exploring perspectives, satisfaction, and interest in further vaccinations if offered. Compliance with second dose regimens was also measured. Results: Preliminary data shows high degrees of satisfaction with vaccines administered at the dermatology office. 97% of eligible patients followed through on second dose regimens. “Convenience” and “comfort with the practice” were the two most common listed reasons for vaccine compliance. 88% of patients stated they would receive other vaccines at their dermatology clinic if recommended and available. Conclusion: Based on these data, it appears that Dermatology clinics can positively impact vaccine hesitance and play a role in public health through offering certain vaccines at their facilities. This data could be extrapolated to make an argument for expanded vaccine administration targeted toward conditions salient to everyday dermatology practice (eg, vaccines for human papillomavirus and varicella zoster).

2.
Drug Topics ; 166(4):28-29, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2030711
4.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-343250

ABSTRACT

Although several studies have shown the safety and immunogenicity of COVID-19 vaccines, few studies address COVID-19 vaccines in PLWH with low CD4 T-cell counts or with co-infection. This cross-sectional cohort study assessed the immunogenicity of 3-dose inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in PLWH. All people with HIV aged 18 years or older vaccinated 3th dose with inactivated vaccine (CoronaVac or others) within 2-15 weeks and regularly followed up at the HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic . All samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 specific RBD antibody and neutralizing antibody antibodies using Chemiluminescence Assay (CLIA) kits and ELISA. The results showed that PLWH with CD4 counts >200 cells/µL could well elicited nAb and RBD-IgG response than CD4 counts <200 cells/µL. There was significant positive correlation between CD4 counts and nAb or RBD binding IgG. Furthermore, no significant differences were found between co-infection HIV/HBV or HIV/Syphilis and HIV patients in RBD-IgG or nAb level. Together, 3-dose vaccine is sufficient to elicit neutralization efficiency against SARS-Cov-2 in PLWH with CD4 counts >200 cells/µL.

5.
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine ; 10(1):64-71, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2017530

ABSTRACT

In developing countries such as Thailand, free-ranging dogs are frequently involved in road accidents and contribute to the cost of public healthcare. Shelters play a vital role in communities because they help to control the population of unwanted and free-ranging dogs. This study aimed to investigate blood pathogen infection in sheltered dogs, as it is one of the factors contributing to animal welfare. Blood samples were randomly collected from 141 dogs from the largest shelter (approximately 400–500 dogs in total) in southern Thailand. Blood pathogens were detected using both PCR and light microscopy. Four blood pathogens were identified: Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, Babesia canis vogeli, and Hepatozoon canis. No trypanosomes were detected. The incidence of blood parasite infection was 56.7% (80/141) by PCR, and 28.4% (40/141) by microscopy. E. canis was the most prevalent pathogen, accounting for 46.1% (65/141) of the cases, while multiple infections accounted for 22% (31/141) of the cases. A triple infection with E. canis, A. platys, and B. canis vogeli was observed in 5.7% (8/141) of the cases. Although PCR is far more sensitive than microscopy, it appears to have equivalent specificity. In conclusion, this study reported a high occurrence of blood pathogen infections in clinically healthy sheltered dogs. Many of them were infected with multiple pathogens and may have been infected before entering the shelter. These findings suggest that a blood test is necessary to screen dogs prior to their admission to the shelter to prevent disease transmission and enhance animal welfare. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

6.
Drug Development and Delivery ; 22(4):18-23, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2012508
7.
Drug Topics ; 165(7):18-19, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2012120
8.
Medicine Today ; 22(11):33-39, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011995

ABSTRACT

Reactivation of the varicella zoster virus as herpes zoster (shingles) typically affects the peripheral nerves, resulting in a painful rash, most often on the torso. However, it can also manifest ophthalmologically, affecting the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. This manifestation is associated with a particularly high level of morbidity and may result in blindness. A new recombinant shingles herpes zoster vaccine protects patients against this virus and post-infection sequelae, improving medical and psychosocial outcomes. © 2021 Medicine Today Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.

9.
Drug Topics ; 165(6):8-10, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011894
10.
11.
General Medicine ; 23(4):10-18, 2021.
Article in Bulgarian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2010863

ABSTRACT

This research registered attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccines among Bulgarians above the age of 16 years and shows a clear division in society on the matter. The proportion of those who trust vaccines is equal to the proportion of those who would not accept a vaccine against the coronavirus infection. The research took place immediately after the beginning of the national vaccination campaign in Bulgaria and allows for further research on the factors of the polar opinions in society. Although those factors are not subject to this research, the anti-vaccine movements and attitudes in Bulgaria and abroad were taken into consideration as those traditionally have an impact on the immunization coverage in our societies. In the process of the survey implementation, the research team directly observed some anti-vaccine movements and their constant efforts to undermine the public efforts for curbing the pandemic. © 2021, Central Medical Library Medical University – Sofia. All rights reserved.

12.
Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis ; 93(4):e2022244, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010582

ABSTRACT

Controversies and skepticism about vaccination have existed as long as vaccination itself. Today and yesterday, the authority of religious leaders has a fundamental role to convince members of their congregations to accept or reject vaccination. Our contribution tells of the stratagem used by the Italian doctor Luigi Sacco to make the faithful lean towards the vaccination using their faith as a means. The history of yesterday's end of today opens a current debate on the role and responsibility of religion around vaccination practice. As COVID-19 vaccine mandates grow, so are requests for religious exemptions.

13.
Journal of Kerman University of Medical Sciences ; 29(4):368-377, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010569

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is a red alarm for global health, so researchers around the world are working on it to design an effective vaccine against it. Protein is one of the candidates for vaccine development which plays an important role in virus pathogenesis. Accordingly, this study was done to evaluate the critical characteristic of this protein as a vaccine candidate using in-silico analysis. Methods: The sequence of SARS-CoV-2-associated E protein was recruited from NCBI and subjected to the IEDB software to evaluate the most potent epitopes. The capacity of the interactions of HLA-I and HLA-II molecules with selective peptides was studied using IEBD tool kit. The E protein sequence was subjected to B cell and T cell tests to realize the most promising peptides that could act as COVID-19 vaccine. Results: Among the tested peptides for the T cell-test, this study found two interesting epitopes: VSEETGTLI and LTALRLCAY that exhibit high binding affinity as a strong indicator to HLA-I and HLA-II alleles together. The results of the analysis demonstrated that some epitopes in the E protein have a relatively higher immunogenicity score based on interaction with HLA-II, such as SEETGTLIVNSVLLF, TLIVNSVLLFLAFVV, LAFVVFLLVTLAILT, LAILTALRLCAYCCN, and SVLLFLAFVVFLLVT. Furthermore, two sequences (FVSEET and PSFYVYSRVKNLNSSRVP) were reported as the selective linear epitopes for B cell, on the surface of SARS-CoV-2 E protein and being Immunogenic. Conclusion: Since E protein can stimulate favorable immune responses, T and B-cell responses, its evaluation in patients with COVID-19 is of a great importance.

14.
Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas : organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva ; 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010551

ABSTRACT

Evusheld (the combination of cilgavimab and tixagevimab, two long-lasting monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2) has been approved by the FDA as a pre-exposure treatment for COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients older than 12 years. However, this monoclonal antibody has been developed from SARS-CoV-2 variants that were predominant at the beginning of the pandemic, when Ómicron was not prevalent. Compared with other solid organ transplant recipients, liver transplant recipients have shown an excellent immune response to standard vaccination with three doses of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. In addition, this population has shown very good adherence to protective measures for the transmission of COVID-19 infection. Several studies have shown that the use of Evusheld is less effective against Ómicron than against other variants of SARS-CoV-2. In addition, in the post-hoc analysis, it appears to be a drug that increases cardiovascular risk. For these reasons, we believe that in liver transplant recipients is essential to prioritize vaccination and protective measures, rather than the use of Evusheld as pre-exposure prophylaxis.

15.
Journal of Commercial Biotechnology ; 27(1):58-76, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010465

ABSTRACT

Most vaccines have a similar method of delivery, utilizing a needle-based system to administer vaccines. Moreover, many require the maintenance of a cold chain to preserve their integrity and usability. While these options are feasible in developed parts of the world, delivering these vaccines to underdeveloped areas becomes difficult. Many vaccines go to waste due to breakages in the cold chain, leaving people without vaccinations. Furthermore, with the recent COVID-19 crisis, needs are emerging around strategies to deliver products that do not require extreme temperatures for storage and allow for efficient vaccine delivery on a mass scale. Many companies, including Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson, have brought to market COVID-19 vaccines. Pfizer and Moderna have found development success and profitability from their vaccine technology, both now and potentially in the future. Still, storage, administration, and waste challenges exist with these current options, creating opportunities for alternative delivery mechanisms. With these vaccines being essential for the current global situation, other administration strategies, such as BioneedleTM, could provide a valuable alternative and help mitigate the associated cold chain and sustainability issues seen with currently available options. Bioneedle Drug Delivery B.V. (BDD), a European biotechnology company, is developing a needleless vaccine-device combination product, the BioneedleTM. This technology value proposition focuses on solving the logistical issues associated with many vaccine products. These include eliminating cold-chain requirements, increasing the speed of vaccination, and reducing non-recyclable, medical waste (e.g., plastic syringes). It employs a reusable delivery system that administers multiple vaccines using biodegradable mini-implants to aid mass immunization efforts. This approach could significantly reduce plastic waste from syringes, translating to a significant sustainability benefit consistent with the United Nation's initiatives. Accordingly, BDD seeks support from a venture, corporate, government, or foundation for developing this novel delivery platform. This case aims to achieve two objectives. First, it seeks to provide an in-depth overview of the value proposition of BioneedleTM, sparking discussion around its feasibility in a real-world setting. The second involves creating dialog regarding improvements to the BioneedleTM system and other innovations that may help mitigate cold chain issues while still providing needleless delivery of vaccines. This case discussion highlights the potential of a new vaccine delivery system that various healthcare settings can use. This approach may pose a cost-effective solution to the loss of vaccines in the cold chain and address the growing concerns around plastic waste and the environment. In closing, this narrative allows for an open-forum discussion around the opportunity of introducing a new medical device platform in a thriving vaccine market. It is a learning experience that requires strategic decision-making in response to questions posed for new startups and the new vaccine technology.

16.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(7):308-313, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010404

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of belief in COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and its associated factors. Methods: Due to mobility restriction, this study was conducted cross-sectionally via online platforms. The included factors were age, gender, religious identity, marital status, education level, occupation, and living with health workers. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between belief in COVID-19 vaccine with the predictors. Results: A total of 5 397 responses were taken into analysis. The prevalence of belief in COVID-19 vaccine efficacy was 62.3%. Whereas factors associated with belief in COVID-19 vaccines were being in the age of 45-54 (aOR 1.767;95% CI 1.219-2.562), 55-64 (aOR 1.703;95% CI 1.219-2.562), and >64 (aOR 2.136;95% CI 1.128-4.047), completing education until the secondary level (aOR 1.354;95% CI 1.111-1.650), working as health practitioners (aOR 2,353;95% CI 1.655-3.344), and living with health workers (aOR 1.278, 95% CI 1.079-1.514). All religious identities including Muslim (aOR 2.447;95% CI 1.183-5.062), Protestant (aOR 3.615;95% CI 1.703-7.677), Catholic (aOR 4.486;95% CI 2.015-9.987), and Hindu (aOR 3.286;95% CI 1.410-7.655) showed significant association with belief in COVID-19 vaccine efficacy. Conclusions: A high prevalence of belief in COVID-19 vaccine efficacy was evident. Since vaccine compliance is determined by an individual's risk-benefit perception, this study emphasizes the need of raising awareness of the benefits of COVID-19 immunization.

17.
Frontiers in Pediatrics ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009892

ABSTRACT

Background: With the rapid surge of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant, we aimed to assess parents' perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccines and the psychological antecedents of vaccinations during the first month of the Omicron spread. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey in Saudi Arabia was conducted (December 20, 2021-January 7, 2022). Convenience sampling was used to invite participants through several social media platforms, including WhatsApp, Twitter, and email lists. We utilized the validated 5C Scale, which evaluates five psychological factors influencing vaccination intention and behavior: confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility. Results: Of the 1,340 respondents, 61.3% received two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, while 35% received an additional booster dose. Fify four percentage were unwilling to vaccinate their children aged 5–11, and 57.2% were unwilling to give the additional booster vaccine to children aged 12–18. Respondents had higher scores on the construct of collective responsibility, followed by calculation, confidence, complacency, and finally constraints. Confidence in vaccines was associated with willingness to vaccinate children and positively correlated with collective responsibility (p < 0.010). Complacency about COVID-19 was associated with unwillingness to vaccinate older children (12–18 years) and with increased constraints and calculation scores (p < 0.010). While increasing constraints scores did not correlate with decreased willingness to vaccinate children (p = 0.140), they did correlate negatively with confidence and collective responsibility (p < 0.010). Conclusions: The findings demonstrate the relationship between the five antecedents of vaccination, the importance of confidence in vaccines, and a sense of collective responsibility in parents' intention to vaccinate their children. Campaigns addressing constraints and collective responsibility could help influence the public's vaccination behavior.

18.
Frontiers in Microbiology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009887

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). According to the World Health Organization statistics, more than 500 million individuals have been infected and more than 6 million deaths have resulted worldwide. Although COVID-19 mainly affects the respiratory system, considerable evidence shows that the digestive, cardiovascular, nervous, and reproductive systems can all be involved. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (AEC2), the target of SARS-CoV-2 invasion of the host is mainly distributed in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Studies found that microbiota contributes to the onset and progression of many diseases, including COVID-19. Here, we firstly conclude the characterization of respiratory, gut, and oral microbial dysbiosis, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Then we explore the potential mechanisms of microbial involvement in COVID-19. Microbial dysbiosis could influence COVID-19 by complex interactions with SARS-CoV-2 and host immunity. Moreover, microbiota may have an impact on COVID-19 through their metabolites or modulation of ACE2 expression. Subsequently, we generalize the potential of microbiota as diagnostic markers for COVID-19 patients and its possible association with post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS) and relapse after recovery. Finally, we proposed directed microbiota-targeted treatments from the perspective of gut microecology such as probiotics and prebiotics, fecal transplantation and antibiotics, and other interventions such as traditional Chinese medicine, COVID-19 vaccines, and ACE2-based treatments.

19.
Frontiers in Genetics ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009858

ABSTRACT

Background: Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a rare autosomal recessive ribosomopathy mainly characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, skeletal alterations, neutropenia, and a relevant risk of hematological transformation. At least 90% of SDS patients have pathogenic variants in SBDS, the first gene associated with the disease with very low allelic heterogeneity;three variants, derived from events of genetic conversion between SBDS and its pseudogene, SBDSP1, provided the alleles observed in about 62% of SDS patients. Methods: We performed a reanalysis of the available WES files of a group of SDS patients with biallelic SBDS pathogenic variants, studying the results by next bioinformatic and protein structural analysis. Parallelly, careful clinical attention was given to the patient focused in this study. Results: We found and confirmed in one SDS patient a germline heterozygous missense variant (c.100T>C;p.Phe34Leu) in the EIF6 gene. This variant, inherited from his mother, has a very low frequency, and it is predicted as pathogenic, according to several in silico prediction tools. The protein structural analysis also envisages the variant could reduce the binding to the nascent 60S ribosomal. Conclusion: This study focused on the hypothesis that the EIF6 germline variant mimics the effect of somatic deletions of chromosome 20, always including the locus of this gene, and similarly may rescue the ribosomal stress and ribosomal dysfunction due to SBDS mutations. It is likely that this rescue may contribute to the stable and not severe hematological status of the proband, but a definite answer on the role of this EIF6 variant can be obtained only by adding a functional layer of evidence. In the future, these results are likely to be useful for selected cases in personalized medicine and therapy.

20.
Patient Preference and Adherence ; 16:2365-2374, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009788

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Unvaccinated older adults with COVID-19 are at higher risk for severe illness and complications compared with those have been vaccinated. Vaccine literacy and attitudes are important factors that enhance healthy behaviors and choices, including vaccination intention. Objective: To explore vaccine literacy, attitudes, and vaccination intention toward COVID-19 among Thai older adults and examine associations between vaccine literacy, attitudes, and vaccination intention. Methods: This study used a cross-sectional online design. We surveyed 408 older adults who met our inclusion criteria. Participants were recruited online via social media and websites. The survey covered demographic data, vaccine literacy, attitudes, and intention to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Results: COVID-19 vaccination intention among Thai older adults was high (81.3%). Females and those aged 60–69 years had higher COVID-19 vaccine literacy scores than males (t = −2.120, p < 0.05) and those aged ≥70 years (t = 2.438, p < 0.05). Participants with postgraduate education and those who were health professionals scored higher for vaccine literacy than less educated (t = −3.501, p < 0.01) and non-health professional (t = 5.437, p < 0.001) participants. Those with an adequate income or that had been vaccinated against COVID-19 scored significantly higher for vaccine literacy and attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine than participants with an inadequate income (t = 4.626, p < 0.001) or that had not been vaccinated (t = 2.842, p < 0.01). Vaccine literacy (r = 0.219, p < 0.001) and attitudes (r = 0.459, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with vaccination intention. Conclusion: COVID-19 vaccine literacy and attitudes are significant factors related to vaccination intention. Health professionals could play an important role in enhancing vaccine literacy among older adults. Positive attitudes and COVID-19 vaccine literacy may enhance vaccination uptake in older adults.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL