Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 5.796
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
J Med Ethics ; 48(9): 611-615, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242516

ABSTRACT

The success of digital COVID-19 contact tracing requires a strategy that successfully addresses the digital divide-inequitable access to technology such as smartphones. Lack of access both undermines the degree of social benefit achieved by the use of tracing apps, and exacerbates existing social and health inequities because those who lack access are likely to already be disadvantaged. Recently, Singapore has introduced portable tracing wearables (with the same functionality as a contact tracing app) to address the equity gap and promote public health. We argue that governments have an ethical obligation to ensure fair access to the protective benefits of contract tracing during the pandemic and that wearables are an effective way of addressing some important equity issues. The most contentious issues about contact tracing apps have been the potential infringements of privacy and individual liberty, especially where the use of apps or other technology (such as wearables or QR codes) is required for access to certain spaces. Here we argue that wearables, as opposed to apps alone, will make a digital contact tracing mandate more practical and explain some conditions under which such a mandate would be justified. We focus on Singapore as a case study that has recently deployed contact tracing wearables nationally, but also reference debate about wearables in Australia and New Zealand. Our analysis will be relevant to counties trialling similar portable tracing wearables.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Wearable Electronic Devices , Contact Tracing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-8, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235962

ABSTRACT

Team science refers to research initiatives considered in collaboration with scientists from different disciplines or fields. This paper presents a bibliometric analysis for visualization of global research activity concerning the combination of cancer and the COVID-19 pandemic using a team science approach. A bibliometric study was implemented using Web of Science from 2019 to 2021. We analyzed citations to identify description and citations analysis of results, most prolific countries, international research collaboration, most prolific institutions, research areas, most cited papers, and most productive journals. The preliminary data of 2,313 studies that adopted a team science approach were recorded and analyzed. Team science is becoming progressively popular in cancer research. The United States was the most active country, followed by Italy and China. The United States, the United Kingdom, and Italy had the highest level of cooperation with other countries. The most prolific institution was Harvard University, followed by University of London and the University of Texas System. Head and Neck Journal for the Sciences and Specialties of the Head and Neck, Frontiers in Oncology, and eCancerMedicalScience were the most productive journals. Governments, organizations, policymakers, and researchers should pay attention to team science approach at times of disasters such as cancer and COVID-19 to achieve the best strategies for controlling cancer that is currently a world problem.

4.
ChemistryOpen ; : e202200150, 2022 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234251

ABSTRACT

The benefits of publishing research papers first in preprint form are substantial and long-lasting also in chemistry. Recounting the outcomes of our team's nearly six-year journey through preprint publishing, we show evidence that preprinting research substantially benefits both early career and senior researchers in today's highly interdisciplinary chemical research. These findings are of general value, as shown by analyzing the case of four more research teams based in economically developed and developing countries.

5.
Drug Evaluation Research ; 45(8):1517-1521, 2022.
Article in Japanese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20245446

ABSTRACT

Under the background of major innovations and changes in international pharmaceutical technology, the continuous development of informatization and digitalization of drug R & D, technology, and the COVID-19 pandemic, the European Commission (EC) issued the pharmaceutical Strategy for Europe (PSE) at the end of 2020 in order to meet the unfinished clinical needs, stimulate industry innovation, enhance the adaptability of the regulatory system, and consolidate the international status of the EC drug regulatory system. PSE is regarded as the "cornerstone" of European health policy in the next five years, which has important guiding significance for the development and management of European pharmaceutical industry. This paper combs and analyzes the background, development strategic objectives and specific measures of PSE, and puts forward policy suggestions in combination with the actual work of China's epidemic prevention and control and industry development, pharmaceutical scientific supervision and encouraging innovation.Copyright © 2022 by the Author(s).

6.
Early Intervention in Psychiatry ; 17(Supplement 1):187, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20245221

ABSTRACT

Aims: Globally, mental illness and substance use disorders are the leading cause of disability and disease burden for young people. Orygen is an Australian youth mental health organization with a mission to reduce the impact of mental ill-health on young people, families and society, and one of only a few known research and clinical centres with a dedicated Knowledge Translation division. This paper provides a case study of the workforce development team within Orygen Knowledge Translation, outlining how implementation science informs their work and how the division has adapted its model of service support in the face of COVID-19. Method(s): Process data on training and resources developed and delivered by the workforce development team at Orygen over the period 2017-2021 was collated and synthesized with team reflections about the adaptations made by team in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Results and Conclusion(s): Since 2017, the team has delivered training to more than 4000 youth mental health workers across Australia, on the topics of trauma, psychosis, mood and anxiety disorders, brief interventions, cognition and other areas of youth mental health. The COVID-19 pandemic generated abrupt and dramatic changes to the delivery of workforce and service development initiatives in Australia due to significant restrictions to travel and in-person events. It also placed major delivery demands on youth mental health services. The COVID-19 pandemic facilitated profound and rapid changes to service delivery and development in Australian youth mental health. Implementation science offers flexible models to support a changing system.

7.
Malaysian Journal of Library & Information Science ; 28(1):89-107, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20245162

ABSTRACT

This study provides insights into the pattern of COVID-19 research publications in Indonesia and aims to map out the contributions of social science scholars in the country during the pandemic, using bibliometric analysis. The analysis was conducted through desk research using the scientometric method from the Scopus database, with a total of 1,037 articles analysed. The research found that social sciences scholars in Indonesia made significant contributions to the fields of online learning, economics, business and management, public health and administration, and communication and media studies. The study also identified the influences of research areas, funding, open access, female first author, female co-authors, and international collaborative research on quartile and the number of citations. The implications of the study suggest that efforts should be made to promote gender diversity in research, allocate research funding appropriately, and encourage international collaboration. Authors should prioritize publishing in high quartile journals and opt for open access publication. Additionally, academic institutions and funding agencies should provide guidance on selecting reputable journals to maintain a culture of quality research.

9.
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences ; 70(Supplement 1):108, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244795

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This scoping review aimed to determine whether the COVID-19 pandemic influenced any modifications to patient selection methods or prioritisation and services provided by proton therapy centres. Method(s): This review was conducted based on the PRISMA methodology and Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review guidelines.1,2 A literature search was performed in Medline, Embase, Web Of Science and Scopus as well as grey literature. Keywords including "COVID-19" and "Proton Therapy" were used. Articles published from 1 January 2020 in English were included. In total, 138 studies were identified of which 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. A scoping review design was chosen to capture the full extent of information published relating to the aim. Result(s): Six of 14 articles included statements regarding treatment of COVID-19 patients. Three publications recommended deferred or alternative treatment, two indicated to treat urgent/emergency patients and one reported continuous treatment for infectious patients. Recurring impacts on PT provision included more frequent use of alternative therapies, reduced referrals, delayed treatment starts and CT simulation, change in treatment volume and staffing limitations due to pandemic restrictions. Consequently, telehealth consults, remote work, reduction in patient visitors, screening procedures and rigorous cleaning protocols were recommended. Discussion/Conclusion: Few publications detailed patient selection or workflow methods used during the pandemic. Further research is needed to obtain more detailed information regarding current global patient selection methods in proton therapy, collecting this data could aid in future planning for proton therapy in Australia.

10.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons ; 236(5 Supplement 3):S96, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244642

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted clinical experience and case volumes. Surgical simulation is now an even more powerful training tool and, to maximize potential, we must ensure learner engagement. Our aim was to identify barriers to surgical simulation engagement and strategies to mitigate these. Method(s): Scoping search was performed with a trained librarian of PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Title and screening were completed with inclusion criteria: articles describing barriers to engagement with surgical simulation. After full text screening, data was extracted from included articles: type of study, MERSQI score, type/number of participants, barriers to engagement and strategies to mitigate these. Result(s): Twenty-nine manuscripts were included with 951 faculty and 2,467 residents. The majority (86%) were in high income countries (HIC) and four in LMICs. Most were surveys (22/29), and five involved semi-structured interviews/focus groups. Mean adjusted MERSQI score was 8. Commonest barriers to HIC engagement were learner clinical duties (9/25), lack of learner time (13/25), lack of learner interest/motivation (9/25) and lack of faculty time or interest to participate (12/25). In LMIC, commonest barriers were lack of simulation lab/equipment (4/4), cost (3/4) and inadequate supervision (3/4). Strategies to improve HIC engagement were mandatory/protected resident simulation training (9/25) and, in LMIC, low cost simulators (4/4) and sharing resources (2/4). Conclusion(s): Identification of barriers to simulation engagement is crucial for successful learning. Given the increased importance of simulation education due to the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical educators should strategize to maximize engagement.

11.
Education Sciences ; 13(5), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244608

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the impact of digital reading during educational disruption on science and engineering students' learning experience. Before the pandemic, some studies explored whether university students preferred using printed or digital resources for their academic readings. Amidst the pandemic, online learning became essential. Several studies showed students' preference for printed text. This paper extends a pilot study that was conducted during the first COVID-19 wave in China. A survey consisting of Likert questions and open questions was designed using MS-Forms. The survey was shared with the science and engineering students in Years 2–4 (Levels 1–3) of their study at SWJTU-Leeds Joint School, Southwest Jiaotong University in Chengdu, China. This covered students from four undergraduate programs: Civil Engineering with Transport, Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Computer Science. In total, 223 students participated in this study. The survey was anonymous and was made available to students for a month. The participation rate is nearly 27%. Findings indicate that the behavior of science and engineering students toward digital reading was different than other majors, and it is generally favorable. The necessity for online learning during educational disruption has encouraged some students to develop their digital reading skills. © 2023 by the authors.

12.
Journal of Statistics and Data Science Education ; 30(2):165-178, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244594

ABSTRACT

Statistical literacy is key in this heavily polarized information age for an informed and critical citizenry to make sense of arguments in the media and society. The responsibility of developing statistical literacy is often left to the K-12 mathematics curriculum. In this article, we discuss our investigation of K-8 students' current opportunities to learn statistics created by state mathematics standards. We analyze the standards for alignment to the Guidelines for the Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE II) PreK-12 report and summarize the conceptual themes that emerged. We found that while states provide K-8 students opportunities to analyze and interpret data, they do not offer many opportunities for students to engage in formulating questions and collecting/considering data. We discuss the implications of the findings for policy makers and researchers and provide recommendations for policy makers and standards writers.

13.
Journal of the Intensive Care Society ; 24(1 Supplement):113, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244534

ABSTRACT

Submission content Introduction: At the end of a particularly hectic night shift on the intensive care unit (ICU) I found myself sitting in the relatives' room with the mother and aunt of a young patient, listening to their stories of her hopes and aspirations as she grew up. She had been diagnosed with lymphoma aged 14 and received a bone marrow transplant from her younger sister. Fighting through treatment cycles interposed with school studies, she eventually achieved remission and a portfolio of A-levels. Acceptance into university marked the start of a new era, away from her cancer label, where she studied forensic science and took up netball. Halfway through her first year she relapsed. Main body: When I met this bright, ambitious 20-year-old, none of this history was conveyed. She had been admitted to ICU overnight and rapidly intubated for type-1 respiratory failure. The notes contained a clinical list of her various diagnoses and treatments, with dates but no sense of the context. Rules regarding visitation meant her family were not allowed onto the unit, with next-of-kin updates carried out by designated non-ICU consultants to reduce pressures on ICU staff. No photos or personal items surrounded her bedside, nothing to signify a life outside of hospital. She remained in a medically-induced coma from admission onwards, while various organ systems faltered and failed in turn. Sitting in that relatives' room I had the uncomfortable realisation that I barely saw this girl as a person. Having looked after her for some weeks, I could list the positive microbiology samples and antibiotic choices, the trends in noradrenaline requirements and ventilatory settings. I had recognised the appropriate point in her clinical decline to call the family in before it was too late, without recognising anything about the person they knew and loved. She died hours later, with her mother singing 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow' at her bedside. Poignant as this was, the concept of this patient as more than her unfortunate diagnosis and level of organ failure had not entered my consciousness. Perhaps a coping mechanism, but dehumanisation none-the-less. Conclusion(s): Striking a balance between emotional investment and detachment is of course vital when working in a clinical environment like the ICU, where trauma is commonplace and worst-case-scenarios have a habit of playing out. At the start of my medical career, I assumed I would need to consciously take a step back, that I would struggle to switch off from the emotional aspects of Medicine. However, forgetting the person behind the patient became all too easy during the peaks of Covid-19, where relatives were barred and communication out-sourced. While this level of detachment may be understandable and necessary to an extent, the potential for this attitude to contribute to the already dehumanising experience of ICU patients should not be ignored. I always thought I was more interested in people and their stories than I was in medical science;this experience reminded me of that, and of the richness you lose out on when those stories are forgotten.

14.
European Journal of Risk Regulation : EJRR ; 14(2):371-381, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244344
15.
Text (Australia) ; 27(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244267

ABSTRACT

Oscar Wilde (1891/1909) declared that it is not Art that imitates Life but Life that imitates Art. What happens when an artistic work, pitched as "soft sci-fi”, predicts something both decidedly unpleasurable and, later, alarmingly prophetic? Such is the case with Watchlist (2020), a new Australian theatrical work written prior to COVID-19, which warns of impending environmental catastrophe and ends with the release of a zoonotic pathogen. The debut production in 2021 was performed amid the global reality of the continuing pandemic which rendered the play a prescient cultural artefact and complicated the audience reception of the work. This study expands from Wilde's concept of counter-mimesis into the theoretical frameworks of Hans Robert Jauss (1982) and Susan Bennett (1997), who provide an alternative to author-centric, practice-led research while laying the blueprint for a dialectical exchange between Life and Art. The dialectical exchange is then explored in the genre of science fiction more broadly, including both literature and franchise filmmaking. Through this analysis, the authors break down the binary of Life and Art, building from Jauss and Bennett, to demonstrate the advantages of this alternative critical vocabulary. © 2023, Australasian Association of Writing Programs. All rights reserved.

16.
Global Health, Humanity and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Philosophical and Sociological Challenges and Imperatives ; : 51-73, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244051

ABSTRACT

This chapter explores the significance of sociocultural and ethical limitations of non-science-based approaches toward effectively containing, managing, and ending global health emergencies. It refers to the 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa and the current COVID-19 global pandemic to underscore the limits of science-based approaches in tackling infectious disease outbreaks. Against this background, it points to the significance of measures rooted in the humanities that have been (or are being) used to demonstrate the values of social, cultural, and ethical approaches in addressing global health emergencies. This chapter shows that while science-based approaches are essential, they are not sufficient toward addressing the varied challenges of global health emergencies. The experiences of Ebola epidemics in Africa and the COVID-19 global pandemic have shown that science-based approaches need to be buttressed by sociocultural and ethical measures to be successful. It has become self-evident that global health emergencies can be addressed sooner if non-science-based approaches are incorporated into the core responses. The successful approaches toward addressing global health emergencies will be ones that adequately harmonized science-based approaches with sociocultural and ethical measures. © The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023. All rights reserved.

17.
Acta Agriculturae Slovenica ; 119(1), 2023.
Article in Slovenian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20244019

ABSTRACT

The various crises are having a significant impact on the entire food sector and are changing the attitudes of Europeans as well as policies on the importance of food security and sustainably produced quality and safe food for consumer health. The paper focuses on the consumer's fear of food security for the time of the first wave of COVID-19 and the associated concern for food security in the future and the changes in consumer behaviour. The online survey in Slovenia was conducted in June 2020 using a "snowball" method. The sample included 490 individuals. The results showed that both measured forms of fear (i) fear over food security during the first wave of COVID-19 crisis, and (ii) fear over food security in the future were statistically significant, moderately strong and positively associated with almost all forms of self-perceived behaviour change caused by the COVID-19 crisis. The respondents focused more on buying locally produced and processed food, food stockpiling and decreasing food waste. Only minor changes were expressed with regards to their food purchasing channels, with the elderly, the highly educated and those who classified themselves in a higher social class buying more often directly from farmers. In the future, the results of this research should be compared with other countries and the impact of an individual's economic situation and the impact of promotional campaigns on agricultural products on changing consumer behaviour should also be analysed in more detail.

18.
Challenges in Science Education: Global Perspectives for the Future ; : 1-311, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20243776

ABSTRACT

This edited volume focuses on challenges facing science education across three areas: curriculum, teacher education, and pedagogy. Integrating a diverse range of perspectives from both emerging and established scholars in the field, chapters consider the need for measured responses to issues in society that have become pronounced in recent years, including lessons from the Covid-19 pandemic, the environment, and persisting challenges in STEM teaching and learning. In doing so, the editors and their authors chart a potential course for existing and future possibilities and probabilities for science education. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023. All rights reserved.

19.
Challenges in Science Education: Global Perspectives for the Future ; : 251-277, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20243775

ABSTRACT

The development and enhancement of science students' metacognition should be an important goal of science education. The extent to which it is, however, is questionable. The explosion of science information (and misinformation) around issues such as climate change, COVID-19, the Anthropocene, and sustainability makes developing students' potentials to be aware of how to manage and monitor the quality of their science learning a priority for consideration by science educators. This is because individuals' science learning will need to continue long after they complete formal schooling. However, attempts to prioritize instruction for metacognition in science education have faltered, stagnated, and lack momentum. This chapter identifies key reasons for this situation and proposes considerations to (re)elevate instruction for metacognition into science classrooms. The considerations involve reorienting research perspectives in the field of metacognition research in science education, considering increasing attention to metacognition in pre- and in-service teacher education, being realistic about our expectations for instruction for metacognition in science learning contexts, and considering the use of Open Educational Resources (OERs) such as podcasts and websites that can be accessed across countries by pre-service and practicing teachers and teacher educators to inform them about metacognition and about instruction for metacognition. © The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023. All rights reserved.

20.
Social and Personality Psychology Compass ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20243518

ABSTRACT

A plethora of research has highlighted that trust in science, political trust, and conspiracy theories are all important contributors to vaccine uptake behavior. In the current investigation, relying on data from 17 countries (N = 30,096) from the European Social Survey we examined how those who received (and wanted to receive the COVID-19 vaccine) compared to those who did not differ in their trust in: science, politicians and political parties, international organizations and towards people in general. We also examined whether they differed in how much they believed in conspiracy theories. Those who received (or wanted to receive) the COVID vaccine scored significantly higher in all forms of trust, and lower in conspiracy theory beliefs. A logistic regression suggested that trust in science, politicians, international organizations, as well as belief in conspiracy theories were significant predictors, even after accounting for key demographic characteristics.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL