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1.
LC GC North America ; 39(7):307, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20236722

ABSTRACT

Early on, whispers of a potentially engineered virus grew and fueled speculation that China was behind the pandemic-speculation so pervasive that, in February 2020, a group of 27 public health scientists published a letter in The Lancet disputing the laboratory leak theory, and announcing their support of their counterparts in China-the scientists, public health officials, and medical professionals-combating the pandemic. Robert Malone, MD, the inventor of the mRNA technology, has expressed strong concern over the risk-benefit analysis of vaccinating young adults, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has met to discuss cases of myocarditis or pericarditis in people aged 30 and younger who have received an mRNA Covid-19 vaccine. What we do know for certain is that the incredible strength and collaboration of the scientific community have allowed us to regain some semblance of normalcy.

2.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases ; 23(6):666, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20234855

ABSTRACT

The deadly complication Scientists failed to find evidence that COVID-19 causes a "cytokine storm” leading to death in patients with COVID-19 but they did find that secondary bacterial pneumonia that does not resolve was a key driver of death in patients with COVID-19 and may have exceeded death rates from the viral infection itself. The approach grouped similar ICU patient-days into clinical states based on electronic health record data and allowed the scientists to discover how complications such as bacterial pneumonia impacted the course of illness. For more on complications in COVID19 see J Clin Investig 2023;published online April 27. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI170682 For more on efficacious monoclonal antibodies see Ann Intern Med 2023;published online April 18. https://doi.org/10.7326/M22-3428 For more on targets for herpes virus see Sci Adv 2023;9: eadf3977 For more on an RSV vaccine in pregnancy see N Engl J Med 2023;388: 1451–64 For more on Pillar[5]arene see Nat Commun 2023;14: 2141 For more on doxycycline for STIs see N Engl J Med 2023;388: 1296–306 For more on immunity in tuberculosis see Nat Immunol 2023;24: 753–54

3.
LC GC North America ; 38(10):562-563, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20234501

ABSTRACT

[...]we did, and we discussed digital transformation's evolution and how laboratories can benefit, too. Curtis: This is a term that's used in so many different contexts that it's important to step back and understand that it's not just about focusing on a micro-component of the work process in your laboratory, but about identifying and addressing a given process end to end. Specifically, you want to improve data capture throughout the entire process. [...]any type of digital transformation is about tackling the end-to-end process rather than any single system, which tends to be a very tactical approach. Digital transformation creates the opportunity to support remote teams and be much more flexible and effective with human capital.

4.
Science & Technology Libraries ; 42(2):180-200, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20233306

ABSTRACT

This study seeks to answer the question: What effects did COVID-19 have on the status of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in higher education in the United States? It presents a thematic review of the current literature regarding the social and professional impacts of the pandemic on this group from 2020 to 2022. The research briefly examines the challenges women in STEM faced pre-pandemic and then explores the repercussions of the pandemic to date. It reviews the literature published from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic to present day. Recommendations for STEM librarians serving this population are discussed.

5.
Pennsylvania Literary Journal ; 15(1):55-57, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20232472
6.
Journal of Information Ethics ; 32(1):114-122, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20232430
7.
The Science Teacher ; 90(5):16-19, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20232136

ABSTRACT

What is the evidence for a consensus among the relevant scientific community? [...]if the source proves credible, ask yourself, "Do they exhibit relevant expertise?" Namely, does the person have the depth of knowledge to vouch for this claim? [...]if you have a credible and expert source, is there evidence that the majority of scientists concur? (Time will vary depending on the depth and complexity of the issue.) Possible scientific claims for students to evaluate include * Do cell phones or 5G communication towers cause cancer? * Can ivermectin prevent COVID-19? * Can earthquakes be precisely predicted? * Are GMO foods safe to eat? * Are recent extreme weather events (hurricanes, droughts, floods) related to climate change? *

8.
IOP Conference Series Earth and Environmental Science ; 1189(1):011001, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20231601

ABSTRACT

The title of the ConferenceXXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists "Interdisciplinary topics in mining and geology”The location and the date of the conferencevirtual event – online conference, June 29th to July 1st, 2022 in Wrocław, PolandXXIInd Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists "Interdisciplinary topics in mining and geology” continues a series of events that started in 2000 at Wrocław University of Science and Technology. Scientific programme of the Conference focuses on four thematic panels:1. Mining Engineering: sustainable development, digitalisation in mining, problems of securing, protecting and using remnants of old mining works, underground mining, opencast mining, mineral processing, waste management, mining machinery, mine transport, economics in mining, mining aeronautics, ventilation and air conditioning in mines,2. Earth and Space Sciences: geology, hydrogeology, environmental protection, extraterrestrial resources, groundwater and medicinal waters, engineering and environmental protection, geotourism,3. Geoengineering: environmental protection, applied geotechnics, rock and soil mechanics, geohazards,4. Geoinformation: mining geodesy, GIS, photogrammetry and remote sensing, geodata modeling and analysis.The XXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists was held as a virtual event, that is as a virtual, online conference in real-time. The reason why the Organizing Committee decided to change the traditional formula of the event to online formula was related to the concern for the health of the participants due to the COVID-19 epidemic.The XXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists took place from June 29th to July 1st, 2022 in Wroclaw, Poland. That is the organizers worked and managed the event from the Wrocław University of Science and Technology Geocentre building. Because the conference focused on four thematic panels, four different special opening lectures were delivered by wellknown scientists- Professor Jan Zalasiewicz (University of Leicester, England)- Associate Professor Artur Krawczyk (AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland)- Professor Biljana Kovacević-Zelić (University of Zagreb, Croatia)- Assistant Professor Eduard Kan (Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanizations Engineers, Uzbekistan).The Conference was divided into 8 oral sessions (with 33 presentations) and 1 poster session (with 33 posters). The amount of time provided to one presentation was 15 minutes, after presentation there was 5 minutes available for discussion. The poster session was available throughout the event, and the posters were available for online viewing on the Conference's website with the possibility of make discussion and ask questions in real time via zoom meeting application as well. Every day of the Conference one "virtual coffee break” was devoted for discussion between participants and question and answer session for the Organizers.There were 96 registered participants from 13 countries. The online XXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists was conducted using the Zoom meeting platform with commemorative screen shots taken. By tradition two competitions, for the best oral presentation and for the best poster were held. The award for the best oral presentation was given ex aequo to Julia Tiganj (TH Georg Agricola University of Applied Sciences, Germany) for the presentation entitled Post-mining goes international: hurdles to climate neutrality using the example of China and Oksana Khomiak, Jörg Benndorf (TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany) for the presentation entitled Spectral analysis of ore hyperspectral images at different stages of the mining value chain, whereas the best poster was awarded to Adam Wróblewski, Jacek Wodecki, Paweł Trybała, Radosław Zimroz (Wrocław University of Science and technology, Poland) for the poster entitled Large underground structures geometry evaluation based on point cloud data analysis.List of Scientific Committee, Organizing Committee, Editorial Team are available i this pdf.

9.
Acta Psychol (Amst) ; 237: 103945, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326054

ABSTRACT

In previous studies, anti-vaccination attitudes have been attributed either to far-right voters or to both far-left and far-right voters. The present study investigated the associations of political orientation with vaccine hesitancy and intention to be vaccinated against COVID-19, and the potential mediating roles of trust in science and belief in misinformation. A total of 750 Italian respondents completed an online questionnaire in the period between the second and the third wave of COVID-19 (from 9th March to 9th May 2021). The results showed that political orientation had both direct and indirect associations with vaccine hesitancy and vaccine intention, mediated by trust in science and belief in misinformation. Specifically, right-wing adherents were less trustful of scientists and believed in COVID-19-related misinformation more than left-wing adherents, and these two factors accounted for their higher vaccine hesitancy and reduced willingness to receive an anti-COVID-19 vaccination. Our findings are in line with the predictions of the mindsponge theory and suggest that communicative campaigns aimed at improving the rates of vaccine acceptance in right-wing adherents should be specifically focused on enhancing trust in science and reducing belief in misinformation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intention , Humans , Trust , Vaccination Hesitancy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication
10.
South Central Review ; 39(2-3):95-116, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2317597

ABSTRACT

This article develops a typology on COVID-19 denialism so we might better understand its sources and what can be done to counter them. The typology will analyze denialism as manifested in great power competition, driven by economics and business interests, motivated by political ideology and populist movements, caused by national security imperatives, and compromised by politicized science. The article also examines the use by China and Russia of social media such as Twitter to create "epistemological chaos" in the industrialized democracies about COVID-19 to further their strategic goals and undermine public confidence in science and technology. Finally, the article concludes with some thoughts on how the social media has replaced traditional news media as a source of information for the public generally, but specifically how it has distorted the public's information about the pandemic and vaccines developed to protect against COVID.

11.
Physics Today ; 76(5):23, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2314469

ABSTRACT

Feder discusses hybrid scientific conferences which is an ongoing experiment. Before the pandemic, remote participation in conferences was often frowned on. But now "the genie is out of the bottle" for remote participation in meetings, which can have the advantage of accessibility and sustainability. Hybrid formats are here to stay, he says, even as "there is a lot of pressure to get back to how we held meetings prepandemic." The purposes of scientific conferences include sharing knowledge, providing visibility for early-career scientists, and maintaining and extending networks. Hybrid options could improve some traditional conferences, which may not always deliver what scientists want from them.

12.
IOP Conference Series Earth and Environmental Science ; 1164(1):011001, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2313029

ABSTRACT

International Conference on Geospatial Science for Digital Earth Observation (GSDEO 2021)The international conference on "Geospatial Science for Digital Earth Observation” (GSDEO) 2021 was successfully held on a virtual platform of Zoom on March 26th and 27th, 2021. The conference was jointly organized by the Indian Society of Remote Sensing (ISRS), Kolkata chapter, and the Department of Geography, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Adamas University. Due to the non-predictable behaviour of the COVID-19 second wave, which imposed restrictions on organizing offline events, the GSDEO (2021) organizing committee decided to organize the conference online, instead of postponing the event.Remotely sensed data and geographic information systems have been increasingly used together for a vast range of applications, which include land use/land cover mapping, water resource management, weather forecasting, environmental monitoring, agriculture, disaster management, etc. Currently, intensive research is being carried out using remotely sensed data on the geoinformatics platform. New developments have led to dynamic advances in recent years. The objective of the international conference on Geospatial Science for Digital Earth Observation (GSDEO 2021) was to bring the scientists, academicians, and researchers, in the field of geo-environmental sciences on a common platform to exchange ideas and their recent findings related to the latest advances and applications of geospatial science. The call for papers received an enthusiastic response from the academic community, and over 100+ participants from 50+ colleges, universities, and institutions participated in the conference. In total 50+ research papers had been presented through the virtual Zoom conference platform in GSDEO 2021.The conference witnessed the presentation of research papers from diverse applied fields of geospatial sciences, which include the application of geoinformatics in geomorphology, hydrology, urban science, land use planning, climate, and environmental studies. There were four sessions namely, TS 1: Geomorphology and Hydrology, TS 2: Urban Science, TS 3: Social Sustainability and Land Use Planning, and TS 4: Climate and Environment. Each session was further subdivided, into two parts, namely Technical Session 1-A and 1-B. Each sub-session had been designed with one keynote speech and 5 oral presentations. Oral sessions were organized in two parts and offered through live and pre-recorded components based on the preference of the presenters. The presentation session was followed by a live Q&A session. The session chairs moderated the discussions. Similarly, poster sessions were organized in three parts and offered e-poster, live, and pre-recorded components. The best presenter of each sub-session received the best paper award.Dr. Prithvish Nag, Ex-Director of NATMO & Ex Surveyor General of India delivered the inaugural speech, and Dr. P. Chakrabarti, Former Chief Scientist of the DST&B, Govt. of West Bengal delivered a special lecture after the inaugural session. Eight eminent keynote speakers, Prof. S.P. Agarwal from the Indian Institute of Remote Sensing, Prof. Ashis Kumar Paul from Vidyasagar University, Prof. Soumya Kanti Ghosh from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Prof. L. N. Satpati from the University of Calcutta, Prof. R.B. Singh from the University of Delhi, Dr. A.K. Raha, IFS (Retd), Prof. Gerald Mills from the University College Dublin and Prof. Sugata Hazra from Jadavpur University enriched the knowledge of participants in the field of geoinformatics by their informative lectures. The presentations and discussions widely covered the various spectrums of geoinformatics and its application in monitoring natural resources like vegetation mapping, agricultural resource monitoring, forest health assessment, water, and ocean resource management, disaster management, land resource management, water and climate studies, drought vulnerability assessment, groundwater quality monitoring, accretion mapping and the use of geospatial sci nce in studying morphological, hydrological, and other biophysical characteristics of a region etc. Application of geoinformatics in predicting urban expansion, urban climate, disaster management, healthcare accessibility, anthropogenic resource monitoring, spatial-interaction mapping, and, sustainable regional planning were well-discussed topics of the conference.List of Committees, photos are available in the pdf.

13.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series ; 2487(1):011001, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2312089

ABSTRACT

The International School on Quantum Electronics "Laser Physics and Applications” was held for the first time as far back as 1980. Since then it has taken place biennially and has become an important international event in the field of laser physics and laser applications attracting participants from many countries, especially from south-eastern Europe. Traditionally, its program includes lectures delivered by prominent scientists dealing with investigations of basic physical phenomena, processes of interaction of laser radiation with matter and latest scientific results obtained in the research areas of quantum electronics and optics, as well as the technological practical applications of new ideas, devices, instruments and laser systems. Special attention is paid to the active participation of students and young scientists who have the opportunity to present their results and meet and share experience with outstanding professionals in their particular fields of research.The topics include the following:• Laser-matter interactions• Laser spectroscopy and metrology• Laser remote sensing and ecology• Lasers in biology and medicine• Laser systems and nonlinear optics• Alternative techniques for material synthesis and processingThe 22nd edition of the ICSQE was held as a virtual forum due to the restrictions related to COVID-19 pandemic from September 19th to 23rd, 2022. The Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, located in Sofia, Bulgaria, hosted the conference organization. The Big Blue Button on-line system was used as a technical platform for the meeting. The technical sessions of the International School on Quantum Electronics included 22 invited talks (30 min + 5 min Q&A), a Mini-Symposium "Extreme light infrastructure”, 11 oral contributions (30 min + 5 min Q&A) and in total 51 poster presentations divided into 5 sessions (1 hour each). The platform was available 24 hours, allowing discussions in addition to the technical program. The total number of participants was 90 from 16 countries.The XXII International Conference and School on Quantum Electronics: "Laser Physics and Applications” was held by the financial support from the Bulgarian National Science Fund under Project No. KP-06-MNF/4, 20.07.2022.List of Committees, International Advisory Committee, Program Committee, Local Organizing Committee, Lecturers, Oral Presentations, Poster Presentations are available in this pdf.

14.
IOP Conference Series Earth and Environmental Science ; 1160(1):011001, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2312074

ABSTRACT

The 2nd Agrifood System International Conference (ASIC)Professor Jurnalis Kamil Convention Hall, Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia, 8-9 November 2022"Research advancement and innovations in agroecology and smart agrifood systems.”The 2nd Agrifood System International Conference (ASIC 2022) was successfully held on 8-9 November 2022. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, this event was held virtually via the zoom platform, directly from Professor Jurnalis Kamil Convention Hall, Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia. This event was organized by the Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Andalas, Indonesia, and became a part of the event to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the faculty. The theme of the ASIC 2022 was: "Research advancement and innovations in agroecology and smart agrifood systems.”There have been numerous revolutions in agriculture, which have improved competency and led to record-breaking yields and gains. The latest process is "smart farming,” contributing to humanity's survival and future prosperity. Smart farming presents numerous prospects for pervasive interconnection and database computer technology as part of Industry 4.0. Smart farming is the idea of agricultural practice in a creative manner while utilizing cutting-edge technology to improve the quantity and quality of agricultural goods. New methods to assure global food safety are part of the future of the food manufacturing industry. It enables farmers to boost yields more effectively and efficiently. Fertilizers, labor, seeds, and water are just a few resources that can be saved. Smart farming has supporting applications, including land management, selection of varieties, minimizing synthetic fertilizers and pesticide inputs, and replacing them with environmentally friendly inputs. Research and related technological innovations have been carried out but have yet to be adopted and properly integrated.The main objective of this conference was to provide a venue for exchanging knowledge, scientific advancement, and innovative ideas among researchers, academicians, governments, and organizations. The scope includes plant breeding and crop production, soil management, plant protection and food safety, the socio-economic of agriculture and natural resources, and all topics related to agriculture. The committee received more than two hundred paper s coming from 46 institutions, national and international. We encourage student presenters from undergraduate to doctoral programs to present their papers;hence, around 25% of s come from them.The conference program was divided into two main segments: plenary and parallel. The plenary session invited 13 speakers from within and outside the country and was attended by 610 participants during the two days' activities. On behalf of the committee, we greatly appreciate the seven speakers contributing and sharing their knowledge at this event: Dr. Silvain R Perret, Scientific Director of CIRAD, France;Mr. Pierre Ferrand from FAO, Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific;Prof. Norman Uphoff, SRI Scientist from Cornell University, USA;Dr. Jauhar Ali, Rice hybrid breeder from IRRI, Philippines;Dr. Trevor A. Jackson, Plant protection scientist from IAPPS/ Coordinator Region XII;Prof. Shamshuddin Jusop, Soil Science Scientist from UPM, Malaysia;and Dr. Wahono: Drone creator from UMM, Indonesia. We also introduced five invited speakers from the Faculty of Agriculture: Dr. Irawati Chaniago - Crop Production;Dr. Dini Hervani - Plant Breeding;Dr. Eka Candra Lina - Plant Protection;Dr. Yuerlita - Socio-economics of Agriculture;Dr. Hery Bachrizal Tanjung - Agricultural Extension. In addition, we have provided an online workshop conducted as a side event on successfully publishing an article in IOP-EES Proceeding.Finally, let me express my sincere gratitude to all presenters, participants, and committee members who contributed significantly to this event's success. Special thanks go to the Rector of Universitas Andalas and the head of the research institute and community service of Universi as Andalas for all the support during the event. We hope to deliver the 3rd ASIC in 2024.Warmest regards,Dr. My SyahrawatiChairperson of the Organizing CommitteeList of Documentations, Conference Committee, Conference Schedule, Parallel Schedule, List of Presenters are available in this Pdf.

15.
Advanced Intelligent Systems ; 5(4), 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2294119

ABSTRACT

The urgency of finding solutions to global energy, sustainability, and healthcare challenges has motivated rethinking of the conventional chemistry and material science workflows. Self-driving labs, emerged through integration of disruptive physical and digital technologies, including robotics, additive manufacturing, reaction miniaturization, and artificial intelligence, have the potential to accelerate the pace of materials and molecular discovery by 10–100X. Using autonomous robotic experimentation workflows, self-driving labs enable access to a larger part of the chemical universe and reduce the time-to-solution through an iterative hypothesis formulation, intelligent experiment selection, and automated testing. By providing a data-centric ion to the accelerated discovery cycle, in this perspective article, the required hardware and software technological infrastructure to unlock the true potential of self-driving labs is discussed. In particular, process intensification as an accelerator mechanism for reaction modules of self-driving labs and digitalization strategies to further accelerate the discovery cycle in chemical and materials sciences are discussed.

16.
Media and Communication ; 11(1):217-227, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2292296

ABSTRACT

Climate change and the Covid‐19 pandemic are global challenges in which scientists play a crucial role, and immediate political actions are necessary. However, in contrast to climate change, strong governmental actions have been taken during the pandemic. While climate change has been on the public agenda for several decades, the pandemic is a rather new issue. In such cases, social media offer scientists the potential to disseminate scientific results to the public and express calls to action and their personal views towards politics. Thus far, little is known about the extent to which scientists make use of this option. In this study, we investigated the similarities and differences between visible German climate experts and visible German Covid‐19 experts regarding advocacy and assessments of policies and political actors on Twitter. We conducted a manual content analysis of tweets (N = 5,915) from 2021 of the most visible climate experts (N = 5) and the most visible Covid‐19 experts (N = 5). The results show that climate experts addressed politics more often than Covid‐19 experts in their tweets. The selected climate experts more often expressed negative evaluations, the degradation of competence and blaming. The Covid‐19 experts, however, made more political calls for action. We assume that an issue's history and context will affect scientists' public assessments of politics. Our comparative study provides insight into the interrelations between science and politics in digital communication environments and elucidates visible scientists' communication behaviours towards different socio‐scientific issues. © 2023 by the author(s);licensee Cogitatio Press (Lisbon, Portugal). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY).

17.
Electronics ; 12(8):1912, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2290739

ABSTRACT

This study presents internet of things (IOT) and artificial intelligence technologies that are critical in reducing the harmful effects of this illness and assisting its recovery. It explores COVID-19's economic impacts before learning about new technologies and potential solutions. The research objective was to propose a solution for self-diagnosis, self-monitoring, and self-management of COVID-19 with personal mobiles and personal data using cloud solutions and mobile applications with the help of an intelligent IoT system, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and 5G technologies. The proposed solution based on self-diagnosis without any security risk for users' data with low cost of cloud-based data analytics by using handsets only is an innovative approach. Since the COVID-19 outbreak, the global social, economic, religious, and cultural frameworks and schedules have been affected adversely. The fear and panic associated with the new disease, which the world barely knew anything about, amplified the situation. Scientists and epidemiologists have traced the first outbreak of COVID-19 at Wuhan, China. A close examination of the genetic makeup of the virus showed that the virus is zoonotic, meaning that the virus changed hosts from animals to humans. The uncertainty associated with the above features and characteristics of the virus, as well as the high mortality rates witnessed in many parts of the globe, significantly contributed to the widespread global panic that brought the world to a standstill. Different authorities and agencies associated with securing the public have implemented different means and methods to try and mitigate the transmission of the infection as scientists and medical practitioners work on remedies to curb the spread of COVID-19. Owing to different demographics, different parts of the globe have attempted to effectively implement locally available resources to efficiently fight and mitigate the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The general framework provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been implemented or enhanced in different parts of the globe by locally available resources and expertise to effectively mitigate the impact of COVID-19. There is currently no effective vaccine for COVID-19, but new technology can be available within weeks to reduce the spread of the disease;current approaches such as contact tracing and testing are not secure, and the cost of testing is high for end users. The proposed solution based on self-diagnosis without any security risk for users' data with low cost of cloud-based data analytics functions by using an intelligent internet of things (IOT) system for collecting sensors data and processing them with artificial intelligence to improve efficiency and reduce the spread of COVID-19.

18.
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society ; 104(3):660-665, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2305722

ABSTRACT

The successes of YOPP from the presentations and keynote presentations included * a better understanding of the impact of key polar measurements (radiosondes and space-based instruments such as microwave radiometers), and recent advancements in the current NWP observing system, achieved through coordinated OSEs in both polar regions (e.g., Sandu et al. 2021);* enhanced understanding of the linkages between Arctic and midlatitude weather (e.g., Day et al. 2019);* advancements in the atmosphere–ocean–sea ice and atmosphere–land–cryosphere coupling in NWP, and in assessing and recognizing the added value of coupling in Earth system models (e.g., Bauer et al. 2016);* deployment of tailored polar observation campaigns to address yet-unresolved polar processes (e.g., Renfrew et al. 2019);* progress in verification and forecasting techniques for sea ice, including a novel headline score (e.g., Goessling and Jung 2018);* advances in process understanding and process-based evaluation with the establishment of the YOPPsiteMIP framework and tools (Svensson 2020);* better understanding of emerging societal and stakeholder needs in the Arctic and Antarctic (e.g., Dawson et al. 2017);and * innovative transdisciplinary methodologies for coproducing salient information services for various user groups (Jeuring and Lamers 2021). The YOPP Final Summit identified a number of areas worthy of prioritized research in the area of environmental prediction and services for the polar regions: * coupled atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean models with an emphasis on advanced parameterizations and enhanced resolution at which critical phenomena start to be resolved (e.g., ocean eddies);* improved definition and representation of stable boundary layer processes, including mixed-phase clouds and aerosols;incorporation of wave–ice–ocean interactions;* radiance assimilation over sea ice, land ice, and ice sheets;understanding of linkages between polar regions and lower latitudes from a prediction perspective;* exploring the limits of predictability of the atmosphere–cryosphere–ocean system;* an examination of the observational representativeness over land, sea ice, and ocean;better representation of the hydrological cycle;and * transdisciplinary work with the social science community around the use of forecasting services and operational decision-making to name but a few. The presentations and discussions at the YOPP Final Summit identified the major legacy elements of YOPP: the YOPPsiteMIP approach to enable easy comparison of collocated multivariate model and observational outputs with the aim of enhancing process understanding, the development of an international and multi-institutional community across many disciplines investigating aspects of polar prediction and services, the YOPP Data Portal3 (https://yopp.met.no/), and the education and training delivered to early-career polar researchers. Next steps Logistical issues, the COVID-19 pandemic, but also new scientific questions (e.g., the value of targeted observations in the Southern Hemisphere), as well as technical issues emerging toward the end of the YOPP Consolidation Phase, resulted in the decision to continue the following three YOPP activities to the end of 2023: (i) YOPP Southern Hemisphere (YOPP-SH);(ii) Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (MIIP);of which YOPPSiteMIP is a critical element;and (iii) the Societal, Economics and Research Applications (PPP-SERA) Task Team.

19.
Complexity ; 2023, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2303742

ABSTRACT

The article outlines an approach to computer modelling called "human simulation,"whose development has been explicitly oriented towards addressing societal problems through transdisciplinary efforts involving stakeholders, change agents, policy professionals, subject matter experts, and computer scientists. It describes the steps involved in the creation and exploration of the "insight space"of policy-oriented artificial societies, which include both analysing societal problems and designing societal solutions. A case study is provided, based on an (ongoing) research project studying "emotional contagion"related to misinformation, stigma, and anxiety in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, along with lessons learned about some of the challenges and opportunities facing scientists and stakeholders trying to simulate solutions to complex societal problems. © 2023 F. LeRon Shults.

20.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 7(s1):130, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2298146

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES/GOALS: This report evaluates participants'experiences from three universities who assembled a complex grant proposal related to research on post-acute sequala of COVID-19 (PASC), also called long COVID. Activities reviewed ranged from the assembly of the team to responses to reviews by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, conducted and recorded on Zoom, with a sample of 15 scientists and staff both during proposal assembly and following proposal review. The sample comprised 40% of the total team equally selected from the 3 universities, The interview protocol was reviewed by the IRB at UTMB and the interviews were recorded on Zoom, and analyzed by means of the constant comparative strategy in the grounded theory method of qualitative research. Given the relatively small number of interviews in this project, we paid special attention to preserving the confidentiality of respondents. Only the verbal tracks of the interviews were professionally transcribed. Respondents were asked to suggest changes for future inter-organizational proposals. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: FIRST INTERVIEWS *LEADERSHIP: The scope of leadership opportunities was expanded as sub-teams in specific areas such as community engagement were formed. *TEAM: Each university's community engagement team specializes in a different ethnic clientele, precluding a singular statement for the proposal. SECOND INTERVIEWS *LEADERSHIP: Staff members noted that the team concept too easily evolved into a bureaucratic format, resulting in less negotiation and more direction. *ASSEMBLY TASKS: The Writing Team turned out to be one of the most critical staff teams. *COMMUNICATION: The behavioral scientists in community engagement do not necessarily share paradigms (e.g., public health, psychology, and social work). They had difficulty generating productive communication and a unified statement for the proposal. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The scientists, as a group, suggested that future proposals should focus on one general topic, such as the microbiome, as opposed to attempting to integrate widely divergent interests. The scientists as a group should decide a priori whether to treat innovative ideas such as machine learning science as a science or a service.

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