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1.
J Palliat Med ; 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097264

ABSTRACT

Context: A daily nine-item "Handbook for Self-Care at Work" was created to increase the well-being and satisfaction of the staff at the department of palliative care of a tertiary oncological center in the United States. Objectives: To evaluate the perceived usefulness of and adherence to the Handbook. Design, Setting and Participants: An anonymous survey was conducted among the palliative care staff asking for the frequency of utilization and the perception of usefulness of the Handbook. Additional data collected included demographics, satisfaction with professional life, frequency of burnout, and frequency of callousness toward people. We also compared the use and perception of the Handbook before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Of 52 palliative care clinicians, 39 (75%) completed the survey. Most participants were women and were <49 years. Most respondents (59%) found the Handbook useful or very useful. Offer help, ask for help, and hydration were perceived as the most useful items. The items most frequently achieved were movement, hydration, and eat light. The least useful perceived item was nap time, which was rarely achieved. During the COVID-19 pandemic, 32 (82%) respondents found the Handbook to be as/somewhat more/much more useful, and 29 (75%) were able to adhere to the items as/somewhat more/much more often than before. Conclusion: Most respondents found the Handbook useful and were able to accomplish the items most of the days. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the staff felt that the Handbook was more useful.

2.
J Nurs Scholarsh ; 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088271

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A diagnosis of chronic illness posed a serious threat to people during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. People with chronic illnesses were faced with increased mortality and reduced access to healthcare. Self-care is the process of maintaining health and managing a chronic illness. Nurses working in specialist services provide healthcare education to people with chronic illnesses. Access to these nurses was decreased during periods of the COVID-19 virus escalation due to the reconfiguration of services and redeployment of nurses. The purpose of the research was to learn from the experiences of people with a chronic illnesses in self-care behaviors and accessing altered healthcare services to inform future practices. DESIGN: A population survey design. METHODS: A mixed methods survey was designed, combining validated questionnaires and scales with open-ended questions. A convenience sample was utilized via using social media platforms. Data analysis included descriptive and inferential statistics. Content analysis was used to analyze open-ended responses. RESULTS: There were 147 responses, with approximately half reporting no changes in face-to-face healthcare contact, 41% reporting decreased contacts and 12% increased contacts. Non-face-to-face contacts were reduced by almost 9%, did not change by almost 60%, while 33% indicated an increase. Participants reported mixed perceptions in contact with healthcare providers during restrictions. In the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care and the Self-Care of Chronic Illness scales, participants scored statistically lower scores than in previous studies. Participants indicated that public health restrictions negatively impacted their confidence, created challenges with re-engaging and that access to care was more difficult. CONCLUSION: This research highlights the importance of providing continued support to people with chronic illness irrespective of other challenges to healthcare services. A structured approach to virtual self-care education is required. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This research concluded that the experience of access to one healthcare professional as opposed to diverse multidisciplinary input was similar for a number of chronic illnesses groups of people during the COVID-19 pandemic. There was an altered dynamic of virtual contacts with healthcare providers and a lack of confidence interpreting what monitoring was required by people with a chronic illnesses due to a lack of preparedness for virtual healthcare delivery.

3.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2084292

ABSTRACT

Burnout syndrome is a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion that affects approximately 70% of nurses globally. Nurses are at higher risk for experiencing burnout due to work, home, and career demands. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the number of nurses experiencing burnout, as they continue to care for patients in highly stressful environments. Mindfulness meditation is a successful strategy for mitigating and managing burnout. Nursing leaders must raise awareness regarding burnout, lack of self-care, and wellbeing among nurses. The purpose of this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest interventional study design was to examine if a six-week online mindfulness intervention decrease burnout levels related to emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and feelings of personal accomplishment, as measured by Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) Toolkit, in registered nurses who cared for adults in a single, inpatient urban care setting located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thirty-eight consenting registered nurses (RNs) participated in the study. The intervention group (n =25) participated in the mindfulness intervention only. The comparison group (n =13) did not participate in the intervention. Data findings supported statistically significant improvement in MBI subscale PA (p = 0.00006) and clinically significant change in MBI subscale EE (from 27.6 to 24.0) post-intervention. These results suggest that healthcare organizations should implement weekly mindfulness intervention activities to mitigate nurse burnout. Additionally, replication studies are warranted to identify and examine predictors related to burnout and study interventions to mitigate burnout and improve mental well-being. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
J Radiol Nurs ; 2022 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083178

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus pandemic affected patients' health and heightened stress among the frontline caregivers, especially radiology nurses. Although there is literature on the effects of stress on nurses, there is a gap on interventions to mitigate the impact of stress. There are evidence-based mindful interventions to maintain balance in stressful situations and reduce perceived stress in sports, neuroscience, and positive psychology. Studies show that even brief periods of self-care reduce stress and cortisol levels. Nurses work long hours and have personal, family, and community responsibilities. Nurses may not have the luxury of extra time to devote to self-care. Therefore, this essay summarizes what stress does to the body; the tangible and intangible costs associated with unmanaged stress among nurses. Five self-care micropractices requiring no additional time called NURSE are offered. When practiced consistently, these micropractices can enhance nurses' well-being, leading to the retention of nursing talent and improved patient care.

5.
Health SA ; 27: 1942, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080607

ABSTRACT

Background: The disruptions of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have placed added stress on health care practitioners' (HCPs) mental health. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have been reported to increase the awareness of burnout and promote self-care practices that enhance mental well-being. Aim: To gain insight into the use of mindfulness through the lens of PhotoVoice on how HCPs reflected on their stressors and sense of self whilst working as frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Setting: This study was conducted online with HCPs working in South Africa during the first wave of COVID-19. Method: A four-week MBI intervention was implemented using Zoom. An exploratory qualitative analysis was conducted using a PhotoVoice methodology. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to generate themes. Fifty-five HCPs consented to participate in this study. Results: The major themes identified were operating on autopilot, feeling a sense of overwhelm because of COVID-19, using faith to cope and being able to attain a sense of self-compassion by the end of the intervention. Conclusions: Using visual representations, HCPs were able to share the development of their reperceived lived experiences of increased self-compassion as they navigated the dilemmas and disruptions of the pandemic. Contribution: A brief online MBI was impactful enough to show a reappraisal of the stressors of COVID-19, such that HCPs felt calmer, more competent and more compassionate. PhotoVoice methodology is recommended for future studies and mindfulness courses. It facilitates a deeper understanding of the practice of imbuing mindfulness and its impact on stressors and the self.

6.
J Integr Complement Med ; 28(10): 799-810, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077567

ABSTRACT

Background: Complementary medicine (CM) is often used as an opportunity for preventive health measures and supportive self-care practices. This study aimed to explore the use of self-care practices and preventive health strategies and the aspects of the experienced emotions during the COVID-19 pandemic in a population with an affinity for CM. Methods: The authors conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study using an anonymous 41-item online survey in the German language. The survey respondents were recruited among adults with an affinity for CM (e.g., as targeted through their memberships in CM associations) from September 2020 to February 2021. A selection of self-care methods, mainly from CM, was presented in the questionnaire. Numerical rating scales (NRSs), ranging from 0 = minimum to 10 = maximum, were used to measure the intensity of different emotions experienced during the pandemic. Statistical analysis was carried out descriptively. Results: A total of 1605 participants (80.6% female; mean age: 55.4 ± 12.6 [SD] years; 43.9% holding a university degree) were included. The use of self-care methods for health promotion during the pandemic was reported by 86.8% of the respondents. Respondents favored staying in nature (85.6%), healthy nutrition (85.6%), and physical activities (83.6%). More than 60% of the respondents made use of vitamin C and/or D, herbal medicines, nutritional supplements, relaxation techniques, breathing exercises, homeopathy, or meditation for health promotion. The analysis of emotional status by NRS (0-10) revealed the lowest mean ± SD (standard deviation) for "feeling lonely" (2.6 ± 2.9) and "feeling anxious" (2.8 ± 2.6), and the highest mean for "feeling connected to others" (6.2 ± 2.5) and "well-being" (5.8 ± 2.4). Conclusions: Participants used a wide variety of self-care methods and prevention strategies to promote their health during the COVID-19 pandemic and showed, overall, a balanced emotional status. Further research should include a control group representative of the general population, to investigate the possible impact of self-care strategies. Clinical Trial Registration Number: "Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien" (German Clinical Trial Register); registration number: DRKS00022909.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Self Care , Adaptation, Psychological , Ascorbic Acid
7.
Bali Medical Journal ; 11(2):939-945, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072272

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Research on the efforts made to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 in pregnant women with online antenatal care and the telehealth method as well as visits to obstetric polyclinics with improved service strategies have been carried out. However, the strategy of midwifery care by paying attention to the anxiety experienced by pregnant women in carrying out self-care during pregnancy during a pandemic and combined with policies from health workers has not been studied. The strategy applied in a pandemic situation must take into account the socio-demographic conditions of the community. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the factors that influence maternity care and find interventions and strategies to develop prenatal care guidelines. This research has the potential to be applied to the socio-demographic conditions of the middle class.Methods: The data used in this study were psychological and self-care data for pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic, involving 65 respondents at the Endang Widayat Maternity Hospital Sidoarjo from April to June 2021. This study is a mixed method study so the data collection process includes quantitative data. and qualitative data. Quantitative data were collected through questionnaires given to pregnant women, while qualitative data was conducted by conducting in-depth interviews with health workers who carried out pregnancy check-ups.Results: This study showed that more than half (61.5%) of respondents had moderate self-efficacy and low psychological factors or anxiety. In addition, the bivariate analysis showed that age, education, occupation, parity status, and psychological factors have a significant association with self-efficacy with p-value respectively 0.01, 0.00, 0.03, 0.01, and 0.00.Conclusion: The study was conducted to explore the factors that influence pregnancy care and that self-efficacy is related to age, education, occupation, and parity. Self-efficacy also affects the psychological factors of mothers during the Covid 19 pandemic. Pregnancy care during the Covid 19 pandemic is focused on increasing the mother's ability in daily self-care to minimize the spread of Covid 19 to pregnant women.

8.
Shinrigaku Kenkyu ; 93(3):256-262, 2022.
Article in Japanese | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2066989

ABSTRACT

Dohsa-hou therapists usually assist clients through physical contact but physical contact is not advisable during the coronavirus pandemic. We explored a non-contact form of self-care Dohsa-hou that clients could conduct by themselves with the aid of therapists' instruction, advice, and feedback. In this study, we created two groups of young adults for a single 60-minute session: a face-to-face Dohsa-hou group (N = 28) and an online Dohsa-hou group (N = 17) via a video platform. We compared the effects of stress reactions, the sense of mind-body harmony, and authenticity. The results indicated that both methods were equally effective in reducing stress reactions and in increasing the sense of mind-body harmony and authenticity. The online group showed larger effect sizes in the sense of physical stability and authenticity compared with the face-to-face group. These effects were obtained by using visual information and deepening immersions in the online Dohsa-hou group. Self-care Dohsa-hou would be useful for young adults because they could engage in Dohsa tasks without the therapist's physical assistance and maintain a healthy mind-body harmony. © 2022 Japanese Psychological Association. All rights reserved.

9.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:1593-1598, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066708

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the healthcare of Type 2 Diabetes patients and identify the factors that correlated. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2020 to February 2021. The study enrolled 400 adults with Type 2 diabetes aged 40–65 years with at least one other chronic illness who received primary care health services in Vlore, Albania. A short questionnaire based on the literature, considering the situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, was used for data collection. The administration of the questionnaire was carried out by trained nurses. All participants give their written informed consent before administering the questionnaire. Pearson’s two-tailed correlations and linear regression were used to test the correlations. RESULTS: Among 400 patients with Type 2 Diabetes in the study, 53.0% were female and 47.0% were men. Most of the participants were married (n = 303) with a high level of edcation (54.3%). Treatment was mainly with oral medications (58.0%). Based on the body mass index (BMI), 63.0% of the participants were overweight. Employment status (p = 003), the type of treatment, oral medication versus insulin (p = 001), BMI (p = 001), and living alone (p = 008) were the most correlated factors. CONCLUSIONS: The care of Type 2 Diabetic patients due to the COVID-19 pandemic is closely associated with social determinants of health and the resources of health-care settings. The need to address innovative approaches to care, including self-care, social support, and e-health, is recommended.

10.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:625-632, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066675

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 outbreak is rapidly increasing as evidenced by the number of cases, deaths and countries affected. However, limited data is available on pregnant women with Covid-19 on which to base recommendations for pregnancy and post-partum care. AIM: Identify the effectiveness of nursing intervention with health education via an android application about self-care and prevention of Covid-19 transmission toward the knowledge and attitudes of pregnant, post-partum and lactating women. METHODS: This study was done in three stages. Stage one was identifying the existing nursing intervention for respondents with Covid-19, stage two involved the health education formulation and built it in to an android application, stage three measured the differences in knowledge attitude of respondents before and after health education by using the android application. 152 respondents pregnant, post-partum and lactating with Covid-19 women participated in this study. RESULTS: Stage one showed that nursing intervention has been done comprehensively. Stage two established the health education: http://cegahcovidbumil.000webhostapp.com;Stage three found that there were differences between pre and post health education via an android application in the knowledge and attitudes during pregnancy, post-partum and lactating women in self-care and prevention of Covid-19 transmission. Significancy was found among post-partum and lactating women (p=0.018*). CONCLUSION: There was a difference in knowledge and attitudes among respondents in self-care and prevention regarding the spread of Covid-19 before and after health education via an android application. Study recommended that health care providers use this method in their intervention to improve health status and prevent further spread of Covid-19. Further research to explore more health indicators is needed.

11.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(10)2022 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065819

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic intensified the stressful and already difficult circumstances of communities of color. Yet, there is no current photovoice research highlighting the lived experiences of these communities from two perspectives-the older adults (OAs) and the frontline healthcare workers (FLHWs). This qualitative study used photovoice to visually portray the struggles of Black, Indigenous, and persons of color (BIPOC) OAs (n = 7) and younger FLHWs (n = 5) who worked with older adults during the pandemic and how they coped and recovered from the challenges of the pandemic. The investigators conducted a three-day training of ten research assistants (RAs) who were paired with either an OA or an FLHW for the photovoice sessions conducted in four stages. Upon examination of the narratives, focus group transcriptions, and photo stories, it became clear that participants faced different challenges during the pandemic, such as the fear of COVID-19 exposure, struggles to adopt COVID-19 mitigation strategies, workplace challenges, and social isolation. Amid this crisis of suffering, isolation, and sadness, participants employed two major strategies to deal with the challenges of the pandemic: positive reappraisal and self-care practices. The findings have implications for clinical social workers, mental health counselors, faith communities, nurse managers and administrators, and policymakers.

12.
Pharmaceutical Journal ; 307(7952), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064990
13.
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults ; 23(3):150-162, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2063222

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This conceptual paper aims to describe aging all over the place (AAOP), a federative framework for action, research and policy that considers older adults’ diverse experiences of place and life trajectories, along with person-centered care.Design/methodology/approach>The framework was developed through group discussions, followed by an appraisal of aging models and validation during workshops with experts, including older adults.Findings>Every residential setting and location where older adults go should be considered a “place,” flexible and adaptable enough so that aging in place becomes aging all over the place. Health-care professionals, policymakers and researchers are encouraged to collaborate around four axes: biopsychosocial health and empowerment;welcoming, caring, mobilized and supportive community;spatiotemporal life and care trajectories;and out-of-home care and services. When consulted, a Seniors Committee showed appreciation for flexible person-centered care, recognition of life transitions and care trajectories and meaningfulness of the name.Social implications>Population aging and the pandemic call for intersectoral actions and for stakeholders beyond health care to act as community leaders. AAOP provides opportunities to connect environmental determinants of health and person-centered care.Originality/value>Building on the introduction of an ecological experience of aging, AAOP broadens the concept of care as well as the political and research agenda by greater integration of community and clinical actions. AAOP also endeavors to avoid patronizing older adults and to engage society in strengthening circles of benevolence surrounding older adults, regardless of their residential setting. AAOP’s applicability is evidenced by existing projects that share its approach.

14.
Tissue Engineering - Part A ; 28:398-399, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2062833

ABSTRACT

Purpose/Objectives: The increase in life expectancy in recent years is closely related to scientific advances in health area. Thus, longevity led to a greater emergence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (DM). In this scenario, chronic wounds represent a serious public health problem. It is estimated that 85% of lower extremity amputations in individuals with DM are related to the presence of foot ulcers. The perception of changes in the skin, such as deformities, superficial traumas and cracks, is impaired in diabetics due to loss of sensitivity, predisposing the appearance of wounds. Ulcers and other injuries can be prevented through simple measures, such as regular skin inspection, specialized care and the use of adequate footwear;as the greater understanding of self-care, the greater the benefits of treatment. In this sense, Primary Care is an effective mean of assisting such individuals, as health education actions can be carried out for this population, their families and caregivers, with a view of promoting health. In addition, the health education process must take place in parallel with medication and dressings, which are essential, especially the latter, given the specificity of the product and the level of tissue regeneration. The primary objective of this study is to present the educational activities developed by the Extension Project Physiotherapy in the Community of the State University of Paraíba in partnership with the research project Tissue Engineering in Epithelial Repair: Biodegradable Scaffold for Tissue Regeneration, which is developing chitosan/Jatropha mollissima scaffolds, in the Laboratory of Evaluation and Development of Biomaterials from the Northeast of the Federal University of Campina Grande. Methodology: The participants consisted of users of Basic Health Units (BHU) in the city of Campina Grande/Paraiba/Brazil. The educational material on Diabetes and Diabetic Foot Wound Care was produced from documents such as articles, guidelines and booklets. The CANVA application was used to create the images and infographics, to facilitate the understanding of the participants, and it was sent along with an explanatory audio. The disclosure took place on the public profile on Instagram @fisionacomunidadeuepb and also through the WhatsApp application for the diabetic elderly who participate in the project, in addition to face-to-face meetings at BHU, to clarify doubts at previously scheduled times and with a limited number of people due to the covid 19 pandemic. Results: The results included a greater understanding of the process of illness and wound development, as well as awareness of the importance of adherence to treatment and care in the use of dressings, especially. According to the records, the participation in the means used was intense, which suggests that these people will also be multipliers in the health education process. Conclusion/Significance: It is concluded that health education strategies, even at the time of a pandemic, are useful in the process of correct information dissemination, helping the most vulnerable population to understand their disease and, at the same time, help them in self care and responsibility, thus facilitating the intervention used by the health and engineering team.

15.
Palliat Support Care ; : 1-6, 2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062136

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This pilot project replicated a self-compassion program to support health-care professionals in palliative care settings. We anticipated that undertaking this program would enhance participants' psychological well-being. METHODS: Participants were recruited by convenience sampling from palliative care services in an area of Melbourne, Australia. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the program was offered online and comprised six once-weekly gatherings. Three survey rounds with identical questions were conducted prior to, immediately after, and 3 months after the training. The surveys consisted of 6 scales: the Self-Compassion Scale, the Santa Clara Brief Compassion Scale, the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Professional Quality of Life Scale, and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index Scale. Paired-sample t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance analyses were used to compare participant responses. RESULTS: Nine participants working in palliative care completed the training and 3 surveys and included qualitative responses. The experience was overwhelmingly positive. Self-compassion (F = 14.44; p < 0.05) and mindfulness (F = 18.44; p < 0.05) scores significantly increased post-training, were picked up in a short time and endured. The emotional state improved by compassion satisfaction, showing a positive improvement 3 months post-training, along with there being no changes in compassion satisfaction, burnout, and dispositional empathy. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Participants all worked in a supportive environment, which encouraged self-care. Even against the pandemic difficulties, a short online program was effective, assisting participants to cultivate their inner resources in mindfulness and self-compassion. While a small sample size, expansion of the training may benefit the wider palliative care workforce.

16.
Chest ; 162(4):A932, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060731

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: What Lessons Will We Take From the Pandemic? SESSION TYPE: Rapid Fire Original Inv PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 11:15 am - 12:15 pm PURPOSE: Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) affects 50% of ICU survivors leading to significant healthcare utilization. COVID-19 survivors are at higher risk for developing PICS given the prolonged duration of critical illness. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of using telemedicine (TM) for the transitional care (TC) of post ICU COVID-19 survivors. METHODS: This prospective randomized un-blinded controlled study was conducted from July 2021 to January 2022. Adults admitted to the ICU with a diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to COVID-19 infection and discharged home were included. Those who lacked communication and internet services, and had pre-morbid conditions preventing independent self-care were excluded. 40 patients were recruited with 20 patients in each arm. The study group (SG) underwent a telemedicine (TM) visit within 2 weeks of discharge, where vital signs logs (VSL), virtual six-minute walk test (v6MWT), and EuroQoL 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire were reviewed. The control group (CG) received a TM visit within 6 weeks of discharge and completed the EQ-5D questionnaire. This study was approved by the WVU IRB (#2104284924). RESULTS: Both groups had similar baseline characteristics. Completion rate of the VSL and v6MWT was 50% in the SG. 39% of SG came off oxygen supplementation compared to 33% in the CG. There was less anxiety/depression, increased request, and compliance to follow-up in pulmonary clinic noted in SG compared to CG, however this difference was not statistically significant. All readmissions were non- preventable (n=3;2 CG, 1 SG). 100% survival rate was noted in both groups at 30-days. 5% of patients were lost to follow up in both groups due to non-working communication devices and lack of response despite multiple attempts made for the TM visit. 67% (2/3) of primary care physicians (PCP) felt that this intervention helped establish continuity of care. 83% (5/6) of participants felt that an intensivist led TC visit provided closure for their ICU hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: There was no significant difference noted in outcomes between the 2 groups, however, this is likely due to underpowered sample sizes. This form of TC is well received by both PCP and patients in screening and mitigation of PICS. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study is the first in the region to show the acceptability and feasibility of using TM for the TC of ICU COVID survivors. It is vital to ensure ICU survivors receive targeted multidisciplinary management to prevent PICS. TM can be utilized in the future for the TC of all ICU survivors. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Ariful Alam No relevant relationships by Bathmapriya Balakrishnan No relevant relationships by Lucas Hamrick No relevant relationships by Sunil Sharma Consultant relationship with Res Med Please note: 7/2021-Present Added 03/31/2022 by Robert Stansbury, value=Consulting fee No relevant relationships by Jesse Thompson

17.
Chest ; 162(4):A840, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060703

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Sepsis: Beyond 30cc/kg and Antibiotics SESSION TYPE: Rapid Fire Original Inv PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 11:15 am - 12:15 pm PURPOSE: Sepsis is the leading cause of hospitalization and mortality in the United States. In addition, sepsis is, by volume, the leading cause of 30 day readmissions across all payer mix in the United States. The risk factors for 30 day readmissions are multifactorial and often portends poor outcomes and increase hospitalization costs. We trialed a pilot program of enhanced sepsis discharge education which consisted of direct patient education prior to discharge, providing a Sepsis Education brochure with tips on self management at home as well as a QR code to direct patients to institutional website in case they needed further assistance, and finally a disposable thermometer to maintain an accurate temperature log to aid in monitoring for signs and symptoms of sepsis. Our primary goal was educate patients about their diagnosis and reduce sepsis readmissions in all non-medicare patients being discharged home. METHODS: The pilot was implemented at on one med/surg unit in our 550-bed tertiary, academic medical center starting in March 2021 and progressively expanded hospital wide over the next six months. The sepsis administrative coordinator screens new in-patient admissions for sepsis (non-Medicare) patients daily and informs medical/surgical unit coordinators of potential candidates. Med/surg coordinators will confirm if patients meet criteria for follow-up (non-Medicare, being discharged to home), provide discharge education and enter the patient in a log for continued surveillance. Subsequently, the administrative coordinator then follows up with a phone call 7-10 days after discharge during which, they assess the patient for worrisome symptoms, confirms follow up appointments, medication compliance and review of temperature log. If the patient needs clinical assistance, they will refer to the patient to the hospital sepsis clinical coordinator or patient’s outpatient physicians. RESULTS: We compared sepsis discharges and 30day readmissions (all excluding COVID-19 cases) from March 1, 2019 – Dec 31, 2019 to March 1, 2021 – Dec 31, 2021. Readmissions amongst Medicare patients discharged home was 15.9 % (110 / 962) in 2019 vs 11.9% (83 / 696) in 2021. For non-medicare patients, the rate was 13.2% (41/311) in 2019 vs 13.1% (51/390) in 2021. In our pilot program, the readmission rate in medicare patients was 17.2% (28/163) versus 5.6% (5/90) in non-medicare patients. CONCLUSIONS: This program captures a patient population which may have been lost to follow-up. Implementation of the enhanced Sepsis Discharge Education led to at least a 30 patient reduction in readmissions yielding an approximate cost savings of $594,000. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Providing educational support, instructions, and follow up calls upon discharge improves medication adherence, compliance, and maintains patient follow up thus reducing readmissions and improving hospital resource utilization and overall cost. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Laura Freire No relevant relationships by Nirav Mistry No relevant relationships by Caitlin Tauro

18.
New Jersey Nurse ; 52(4):16-16, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2058607
19.
Current Directions in Biomedical Engineering ; 8(2):93-96, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2054432

ABSTRACT

Self-care and improving one’s well-being has been growing rapidly in recent years for manifold reasons (e.g. higher workload, corona pandemic). Consumer-grade noninvasive stimulation devices are therefore on the rise to counteract the occurrence of mood disorders and burn-out symptoms. Here, we aim at investigating the impact of dynamically varying auditory-visual stimulation patterns on neural entrainment patterns and resonance phenomena. Twenty-two healthy volunteers (11 female, 25.4±5.1 years, one dropout, seven in control group) participated in the study. EEG data (64 channel;equidistant layout) were acquired pre- and during stimulation for each volunteer. Visual and auditory stimuli were presented via a headset (ATUM, NeuroBright;https://www.neurobright.co.uk/). Presentation patterns (frequency, intensity, spatial distribution) varied within a presentation session but were kept constant across all volunteers. Stimulus intensity was adjusted to individual comfort levels. Individual alpha peak frequencies (iAPF) were calculated via the power spectral density with 50% overlapping 10s epochs from pre-stimulation segments. For both, the study and the control group, a time-frequency representation was calculated for the pre- and during-stimulation segments. From this, power values were determined for different frequency-bands (iAPF, stimulation frequencies and second harmonics of the latter). Statistical analyses focused on contrasting the power values between pre- and during stimulation. Mean iAPF values were 10.25±0.99Hz for the study and 10.63±1.21Hz for the control group respectively. Both, power values at the stimulation frequencies and their second harmonics differed significantly between pre- and during stimulation (pstim=0.001;pharm=0.001) in the study group. No such difference was found for the control group (pstim=0.352;pharm=0.237). Further, neither the study nor the control group showed significant iAPF power differences (pstudy=0.035;pcontrol=0.352;alpha*=0.008). Our results suggest that lightweight, portable auditory-visual presentation devices represent an effective tool for generating entrainment and resonance effects at home. Further analyses will focus on the investigation of individual differences driving such modulatory effects. © 2022 The Author(s), published by De Gruyter.

20.
Clin Nurs Res ; : 10547738221125991, 2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053681

ABSTRACT

Due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), diabetes services have been disrupted, causing difficulties for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and understanding their experience could help improve diabetes care. Therefore, we used a qualitative interpretive description to explore the experience of self-care of adults with T2DM during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed theoretically. The sample (N = 30) was composed of 7 females and 23 males, with a mean age of 69.9 years (60-77) and 19.4 mean years (3-40) of people living with T2DM. Our findings show reduced physical activity and increased smoking and alcohol consumption affected that self-care. Increased food consumption and stress eating, with greater stress and anxiety, caused worsening of glycemic values. Participants were able to contact healthcare professionals via eHealth or telephone. Others, even those with complications, were not able to receive care or advice. These results suggest that easier contact with health providers, continuous engagement, eHealth solutions, and formal peer support could help self-care in T2DM. Advanced nursing roles and services could solve many issues reported in this study during and after the pandemic.

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