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1.
Geriatric Nursing ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2041764

ABSTRACT

Disparities in Internet access are barriers to older populations’ well-being. This study examined the association between changes in older adults’ Internet usage during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and their self-rated health. Participants were adults aged 65 years and above, selected from the 2020 Digital Divide Survey conducted in Korea (n = 1150). Changes in Internet use among younger (aged 65–74 years) and older (aged 75 years and above) groups and the association between these changes and participants’ self-rated health were examined. Internet usage remained similar or increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly among the younger group. Increased Internet use was associated with better self-rated health of the participants. Other characteristics, including age, income, and education level, were also positively associated with their health. This study highlights the need for increasing older adults’ access to online activities to enhance health equity in the digital era.

2.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2022933

ABSTRACT

BackgroundHealth literacy (HL) is considered a crucial determinant of disease prevention and control. However, the role of HL in the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has not been studied using provincial representative data among Chinese residents. This study aimed to assess the association between HL and COVID-19 awareness among Zhejiang residents based on the 2020 China Health Literacy Survey (CHLS). MethodsThe study was conducted among 5,596 residents aged 15-69 in Zhejiang using multistage, stratified, and probability proportional to size sampling. COVID-19 awareness and HL were assessed using the "Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (2020)" in Zhejiang. The covariates were divided into predisposing factors, enabling factors, and need factors according to Anderson's model. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test and logistic regression. ResultsThe study showed that HL and COVID-19 awareness levels of residents were 24.84% and 8.06%, respectively, in Zhejiang in 2020. After adjusting for covariates, residents with adequate HL were more likely to have better COVID-19 awareness (odds ratio [OR] = 5.22, 95% CI = 4.13-6.59, p < 0.001). Three dimensions of HL (knowledge and attitudes, behavior and lifestyle, and health-related skills) were associated with COVID-19 awareness. Additionally, COVID-19 awareness was associated with age, occupation, family size, annual household income, and chronic conditions. ConclusionCOVID-19 awareness is significantly associated with HL, suggesting that promoting HL is an important component of health education, disease prevention, and health promotion in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and even possible public health emergencies in the future.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957293

ABSTRACT

Several studies have reported the adverse impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on health outcomes. However, little is known about which area of COVID-19 infection matters most for an individual's subjective health outcomes. We addressed this issue in the present study. We used the longitudinal data of 2260 individuals obtained from a two-wave internet-based nationwide survey conducted in Japan. We estimated the multilevel regression models, which controlled for fixed effects at the individual and prefecture levels, to explain an individual's self-rated health (SRH) based on the reported number of new COVID-19 infection cases at different area levels: prefecture, group of neighboring prefectures, and regional bloc. We found that SRH was highly associated with the average and maximum number of new infection cases among neighboring prefectures or in the regional bloc, but not with those at the prefecture level, if used jointly as explanatory variables. The results suggest that inter-prefectural coordination is needed not only to contain COVID-19 but also to reduce its adverse impact on the subjective health outcomes of residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Multilevel Analysis , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941483

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Young adults who self-identify as a sexual minority may have been particularly harmed by the consequences of lockdown, closure of educational institutions, and social distancing measures as they are likely to have been confined in households that may not be supportive of their sexual orientation. We examine inequalities in the mental health and self-rated health of sexual minority young adults, compared to their heterosexual peers, at the height of lockdown restrictions in the UK. METHODS: We analysed data from singletons who participated in waves 6, 7, and the wave 1 COVID-19 survey (n = 2211) of the Millennium Cohort Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study of infants born in the UK between September 2000 and January 2002. Regression models compared the mental health, self-rated health, and social support of sexual minority young adults to that of their heterosexual peers. RESULTS: One in four young adults self-identified with a sexual orientation or attraction other than completely heterosexual. Sexual minority young adults had significantly lower levels of social support (ß = - 0.38, SE 0.08), poorer self-rated health (OR 3.91, 95% CI 2.41-6.34), and higher levels of psychological distress (ß = 2.26, SE 0.34), anxiety (ß = 0.40, SE 0.15), and loneliness (ß = 0.66, SE 0.18) when compared to heterosexual young adults. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual minority young adults in the UK have been detrimentally impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, experiencing inequalities in mental health, self-rated health, and social support when compared to heterosexual young adults. Implications for policy and practice include a stronger provision of safe spaces in the community and in institutions, and policies that address marginalisation and harassment.

5.
Rev Relig Res ; 64(2): 249-278, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1920253

ABSTRACT

Background: Research to date has suggested that religion might be a source of comfort and strength in times of crisis brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, but it may also be a form of stress if spiritual struggles are experienced. We posit the discussion of religious and spiritual matters as a potential feature of religious life that may be helpful or harmful for dealing with the impacts of spiritual struggles. Purpose: This study has two objectives. First, we assess the association between religious/spiritual struggles and both perceptions of psychological distress and self-rated health, affording attention to the prevalence of religious struggles during this time. Second, drawing from social penetration theory, we consider both the potential helpful and harmful role of discussing religion with friends and family members for the well-being of those experiencing various degrees of religious/spiritual struggles. Methods: Using data from a nationally representative sample of Americans collected in January 2021, nearly a year after the onset of the pandemic (N = 1,711), we conduct a series of OLS and ordinal logistic regression models. Results: Results suggest that religious/spiritual struggles were somewhat common among Americans during COVID-19 and were associated with greater psychological distress and worse perceived self-rated health during the pandemic. In the context of high R/S struggles, both psychological distress and perceived self-rated health were more favorable when religious and spiritual matters were discussed very frequently, several times a week or more. Unlike for psychological distress, however, we found no evidence that discussion of religious matters in the face of greater R/S struggles exacerbated their ill effect on health. Supplemental analyses showed that these findings are not being driven by religious denominational differences across our focal variables. Conclusions and implications: Encouraged by discussions of faith with close network confidants, people experiencing R/S struggles might seek help in the form of counseling in both secular and/or religious settings. Exploring potential resilience factors, such as religious discussion, may help inform broader or more local strategies aimed at economic recovery. Our results therefore invite future investigation into the role of religious coping in mitigating the health effects of pandemic hardship.

6.
Soc Sci Med ; 306: 115156, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895443

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and consequent lockdown measures have had a large impact on people's lives. Recent evidence suggests that self-rated health (SRH) scores remained relatively stable or increased during the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: For the current project, we examine potential changes in the variance decomposition of SRH before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Netherlands. METHODS: We analyse data from the Netherlands Twin Register to examine pre-pandemic SRH scores (N = 16,127), pandemic SRH scores (N = 17,451), and SRH difference scores (N = 7464). Additionally, we perform bivariate genetic analyses to estimate genetic and environmental variance components in pre-pandemic and pandemic SRH, and estimate the genetic correlation to assess potential gene-environment interaction. RESULTS: The majority of the sample (66.7%) reported the same SRH before and during the pandemic, while 10.8% reported a decrease, and 22.5% an increase. Individuals who reported good/excellent SRH before the pandemic were most likely to report unchanged SRH during the pandemic, and individuals with bad/mediocre/reasonable SRH more often reported increased SRH. The bivariate longitudinal genetic model reveals no significant change in variance decomposition of SRH from before to during the pandemic, with a heritability estimate of 45% (CI 36%-52%). We found that the genetic correlation could be constrained to 1, and a moderate unique environmental correlation (rE = 0.49, CI = 0.37 to 0.60). CONCLUSIONS: We theorize that the increases in SRH are explained by uninfected individuals evaluating their health more positively than under normal circumstances (partly through social comparison with infected individuals), rather than actual improvements. As the same genes are expressed under different environmental exposures, these results imply no evidence for gene-environment interaction. While different environmental factors might influence SRH at the two time-points, the influence of environmental factors does not become relatively more important during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Population Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Health Status , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875636

ABSTRACT

Indoor air pollution is injurious to human health, even worse than outdoor air pollution. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence using large samples in developing countries regarding whether indoor air purification can improve human health by reducing indoor air pollutants. Using the data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey in 2015, this study analyzes the relationship between indoor air purification and residents' self-rated health. We apply the generalized ordered logit model and find that indoor air purification has a significantly positive effect on residents' self-rated health. This positive effect is limited to improving the probability of residents' health level being rated "good", and there is no significant movement between the two levels of "bad" and "fair". The results also show that, as an important source of indoor air pollutants, solid fuels used in cooking significantly reduced residents' self-rated health level. Additional results show the heterogeneity of the relationship between indoor air purification and resident health among groups with different characteristics. This study provides empirical evidence for further optimizing the indoor air environment.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants , Air Pollution, Indoor , Air Pollution , Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution, Indoor/analysis , China , Humans , Nutrition Surveys
8.
SSM Popul Health ; 18: 101128, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867799

ABSTRACT

Rationale: A large body of work demonstrates the impact of housing instability on health by exploring the effects of evictions and homelessness on psychological wellbeing of young adults and children. However, limited research leverages national longitudinal data to examine whether and how experiences of a range of housing insecurity events, rather than just eviction or homelessness, affect physical health among midlife and older adults. Objective: The current study examines (1) prevalence of housing insecurity among midlife and older adults by age and race, (2) linkages between housing insecurity experiences and facets of physical health, and (3) age and race moderations on these effects. Method: This study employs regression models to examine whether experiences of housing insecurity affect self-rated physical health and chronic physical conditions among midlife and older adults (N = 2598) leveraging two waves of the National Study of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS). Results: Models revealed that housing insecurity experiences predicted poorer self-rated physical health and additional chronic conditions, even when controlling for previous physical health. Moderation analyses indicated that housing insecurity has a stronger relationship with chronic conditions among midlife adults as compared to older adults, and among Black adults as compared to white adults. These results suggest that experiences of housing insecurity leave adults vulnerable to compromised physical health, and that housing insecurity experiences may be particularly detrimental to the health of midlife Black adults. Conclusions: This research adds to the extant literature by introducing a comprehensive measure of housing insecurity experiences, and contributes to a life course perspective regarding how housing insecurity can affect physical health. This research has implications for policy that addresses housing insecurity as a public health concern, especially in the aftermath of the 2008 recession and the economic and housing crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760613

ABSTRACT

Loneliness has been associated with poor health. Social capital (SC) could possibly prevent the ill effects of loneliness. The study aims to assess the association of loneliness with physical and mental health in four different communities in Israel and study the impact of structural and cognitive SC on that association. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey with 4620 adults in four towns was conducted. The questionnaire included self-rated health (SRH), mental health (MH), loneliness, cognitive and structural SC and socioeconomic characteristics. Logistic regression analysis and mediation and moderation effects were calculated. Loneliness was associated with worse SRH (OR = 0.4-0.5) and worse MH (OR = 2.0-10). Both SC variables were associated with health. However, towns differ in these associations. Structural SC serves as a significant mediator between loneliness and SRH in all towns and is a mediator between loneliness and MH in two towns. Cognitive social capital was a moderator between loneliness and MH in two towns. This study suggests that increasing SC could possibly compensate for loneliness and buffer its effect on health. The study reinforces the need for the performance of separate health profiles to assess possible interventions for each community, as not always can we generalize these results to all communities.


Subject(s)
Loneliness , Social Capital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Israel , Loneliness/psychology , Socioeconomic Factors
10.
J Epidemiol ; 32(4): 195-203, 2022 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disproportionately affected the most vulnerable populations. We assessed the prevalence and disparities of economic hardships and their impact on health deterioration in Japan. METHODS: Data were obtained from a nation-wide, cross-sectional, internet-based, self-reported survey conducted during August-September, 2020 with individuals aged 15-79 years in Japan (n = 25,482). Economic hardships and changes in various physical and mental health status were measured using sample-weighted data. Adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) were estimated to investigate the associations between economic hardships and health outcomes. RESULTS: During April-September, 2020 in Japan, 25.0%, 9.6%, 7.9%, and 3.1% of the respondents experienced income loss, money shortage, financial anxiety and financial exploitation, respectively, with higher prevalence among workers (vs non-workers). Stratifying by sex and working status, income loss was associated with physical health deterioration (APRs ranged from 1.45-1.95), mental health deterioration (APRs ranged from 1.47-1.68), and having serious psychological distress (APRs ranged from 1.41-2.01) across all strata. Shortage of money and financial anxiety were also associated with increased likelihood of all adverse health outcomes assessed, regardless of whether the hardships were pre-existing or experienced first time. Among non-working individuals, financial exploitation was associated with physical health deterioration among males (APR 1.88) and mental health deterioration among both males (APR 1.80) and females (APR 2.23), while such associations were not observed among working individuals. CONCLUSIONS: During the early phase of the COVID-19 epidemic, COVID-19-related economic hardships were associated with physical and mental health deterioration in Japan, particularly among the vulnerable populations. Timely and prompt responses are warranted to mitigate both economic and health burdens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Financial Stress , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Young Adult
11.
Front Sports Act Living ; 4: 809465, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742282

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies have determined that exercise and physical activity positively affect physical and mental health, and that healthy workers contribute to increased work performance. The relationship between the time spent on exercise during leisure time and physical activity, including work, with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in workers is unclear, with variations observed between occupational types. This cross-sectional study examined these associations among Japanese workers from various occupations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: An Internet-based national health survey-Collaborative Online Research on Novel-coronavirus and Work-study (CORoNaWork study)-was conducted among 33,087 Japanese workers in December 2020. After excluding invalid responses, 27,036 participants were categorized into four and five groups according to exercise and physical activity time, respectively. Each group's scores were compared on each of the four questions on the Japanese version of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health-Related Quality of Life (CDC HRQOL-4) using generalized linear models. Age-sex adjusted and multivariate models were used to compare each index of the CDC HRQOL-4. Results: Compared to the reference category (almost never), any level of exercise (ORs 0.56-0.77) and physical activity (ORs 0.93-0.88) were associated with better self-rated health in the multivariate model. Any exercise was also associated with significantly reduced odds for physically or mentally unhealthy days; however, high levels of physical activity (≥120 min/day) were associated with significantly increased odds for these outcomes (ORs = 1.11 and 1.16, respectively). Conclusions: The results suggest that exercise habits are more critical to workers' HRQOL than physical activity. Interventions that encourage daily exercise even for a short time are likely to be associated with better workers' health and work performance.

12.
Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn ; : 1-14, 2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722025

ABSTRACT

Self-rated health (SRH) has been used to predict cognitive decline in various populations; however, this relationship has not been examined in Latinos. This study examines the relationship between SRH and cognition among middle-aged and older Latinos. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among Latinos (n = 425, Mage = 64.13 ± 7.65, 82% female). Participants rated their health as poor/fair, good, and excellent and completed cognitive performance tests. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) examined differences in cognition between SRH categories. ANCOVAs showed significant differences in SRH categories for working memory (F [2, 357] = 3.63, p = .028) and global cognition (F [2, 348] = 3.074, p = .047), such that those who self-rated their health as good had better scores compared to participants in the poor/fair category. Findings show that SRH is associated with cognition among middle-aged and older Latinos. SRH may serve as an indicator of early signs of cognitive decline.

13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715313

ABSTRACT

This study aims to identify the independent influence of face-to-face contact (FFC) and non-face-to-face contact (NFFC) on the subsequent decline in self-rated health and mental health status by age. A total of 12,000 participants were randomly selected among residents in the study area, and 1751 of them responded to both the 2016 and 2018 mail surveys. The participants were subsequently classified into three age groups (25-49: Young adults; 50-64: Mid-aged adults; and 65-84: Older adults). Social contact was assessed by computing the frequencies of FFC and NFFC. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the risk of social contact on the decline in self-rated health and World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index. Both FFC and NFFC were significantly associated with maintaining mental health; however, the impacts of FFC on mental health were more significant than that of NFFC among older adults and young adults. Compared with the no contact group, FFC was significantly associated with maintaining self-rated health in mid-aged adults. The influence of FFC and NFFC on health differed by age group.


Subject(s)
Health Status , Interpersonal Relations , Mental Health , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
SSM Popul Health ; 17: 101060, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712989

ABSTRACT

An emerging body of work has started to document population health consequences of the social and economic transformations during the COVID-19 pandemic. We consider an individual's relative social position in the stratification system-subjective social status (SSS)-and assess how past (childhood) and current SSS predict change in self-rated health during the pandemic. Using two waves of data from the Canadian Quality of Work and Economic Life Study, we follow respondents between the onset of lockdown measures in March and May of 2020 (N = 1886). Drawing from the life course perspective and stress process model, we find that lower current SSS predicts a greater likelihood of being in stable poor health and reporting declining health. Lower past SSS predicts a higher chance of being in stable poor health indirectly through current SSS. And lower cumulative SSS that sums both past and present SSS also predicts stable poor health, while perceived upward mobility over time is associated with stable good health. This robust relationship between SSS and health in such a short time period of two months at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic provides an important glimpse into the influence that SSS has on population health.

15.
Prev Med ; 155: 106919, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586234

ABSTRACT

In this study we examined the psychological distress, self-rated health, COVID-19 exposure, and economic disruption of a sample of the nonmetropolitan western U.S. population and labor force one year after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using novel primary survey data from non-metropolitan counties in the eleven contiguous western United States collected from February 28 until April 3, 2021 (n = 1203), we descriptively analyzed variables and estimated binomial and multinomial logit models of the association between economic disruption, COVID-19 exposure, self-rated health, and psychological distress. Results showed there was widespread presence of psychological distress, COVID-19 exposure, and economic disruption among the overall sample and members of the labor force. There was extremely high incidence of serious psychological distress (14.8% CI [12.1,17.8] of the weighted sample), which was heightened among the labor force (16.6%, CI [13.0,20.9] of those in the labor force). We found economic disruption was associated with severe psychological distress, but exposure to infection was not. Comparatively, overall self-rated health was at similar levels as prior research and was not significantly associated with economic disruption or COVID-19 exposure. COVID-19, particularly its associated economic effects, had a significant relationship with serious psychological distress in this sample of adults in the nonmetropolitan western United States.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adult , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
16.
Int J Prison Health ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546138

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Older incarcerated persons are an especially vulnerable segment of the prison population, with high rates of multimorbidity. This study aims to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on older incarcerated persons' mental and physical health. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Participants were 157 currently-incarcerated persons age ≥50 years who were enrolled in an ongoing longitudinal study before the pandemic. Anxiety symptoms (seven-item generalized anxiety disorder questionnaire), depressive symptoms (eight-item patient health questionnaire) and self-rated health (SRH) were assessed during in-person interviews completed before the pandemic and via mailed surveys during the pandemic (August-September 2020). A mediation model evaluated the relationship among anxiety, depression and SRH. FINDINGS: Participants were 96% male, racially diverse (41% White, 41% Black, 18% Hispanic/Other), with average age 56.0(±5.8) years. From before to during the pandemic, anxiety symptoms increased (worsened) (from 6.4 ± 5.7 to 7.8 ± 6.6; p < 0.001), depressive symptoms increased (worsened) (from 5.5 ± 6.0 to 8.1 ± 6.5; p < 0.001) and SRH decreased (worsened) (from 3.0 ± 0.2 to 2.6 ± 0.2; p < 0.001). The total effect of worsening anxiety symptoms on worsening SRH (-0.043; p < 0.001) occurs entirely because of worsening depressive symptoms, i.e. the direct effect was statistically non-significant -0.030 (p = 0.068). PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Older incarcerated persons experienced worsening mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic which was associated with worsening SRH. These findings have implications for health-care costs and services needed to care for this vulnerable group. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This is the first study to evaluate change in older incarcerated persons' mental health from before the COVID-19 pandemic to during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prisoners , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Scand J Public Health ; 50(1): 136-143, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501952

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Despite success in avoiding morbidity and mortality in the oldest members of the population during the COVID-19 pandemic, the crisis may have affected the well-being of older adults, for example due to social distancing measures. The aim of this study was to examine the well-being of older Faroese by conducting a direct comparison of well-being indicators on the same group of elderly people before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data were collected from 227 home-dwelling adults aged 82-86 years from the Faroese Septuagenarians cohort. The pre-COVID-19 period was from December 2017 to January 2019, and the COVID-19 period was from 8 June to 15 July 2020. Three aspects of well-being were assessed: loneliness, self-rated health and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there were significant increases in loneliness (21.8% vs. 6.8%; p<0.001) and in worse self-rated health compared to the previous year (37.2% vs. 19.0%; p<0.001). In terms of quality of life, the domains of overall quality of life (74.33±14.96 vs. 71.88±15.21; p=0.04) and physical health (73.81±17.11 vs. 71.66±17.37; p=0.03) deteriorated. On the other hand, the domains of social relationships (78.87±16.52 vs. 85.81±13.35; p<0.001), environment (82.49±10.78 vs. 87.06±7.88; p<0.001) and psychological health (77.07±11.52 vs. 80.53±10.89; p<0.001) improved during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that attention should be directed to loneliness and physical well-being amongst home-dwelling old adults, despite the elderly showed resilience and improved psychological health, social relations and environment domains in a quality of life assessment during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Humans , Loneliness , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468399

ABSTRACT

Regular exercise may be associated with better self-rated health and sleep status. However, this correlation among various age groups, such as young, middle-aged, and older people, as well as during the COVID-19 pandemic, has not been examined. This study examined the correlation between regular exercise and self-rated health and sleep quality among adults in Japan during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected using an online survey conducted between February 26 and 27, 2021. A total of 1410 adults in Japan (age range, 20-86 years) completed the online survey. Regular exercise was divided into: (1) more than 30 min of moderate exercise a day, (2) more than 2 days per week, and (3) continuous for 1 year or longer. Self-rated health and sleep quality were assessed using the Likert scale. After adjusting for multiple confounders, regular exercise was correlated with decreased poor self-rated health and poor sleep quality in middle-aged adults; however, no significant correlation was observed among young and older adults. The promotion of regular exercise among middle-aged people during the COVID-19 pandemic may contribute to better self-rated health and sleep quality status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Exercise , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Young Adult
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403597

ABSTRACT

Understanding the specific factors associated with poor health is critical to improve the health of homeless people. This study aimed to analyze the influence of personal variables, interpersonal relationships, and the influence of social services on the health of homeless people. A secondary analysis was applied to cross-sectional data from a sample of 1382 homeless people living in the Basque Country (Spain) (75.69% male). Multinomial logistic regression modelling was used to analyze the relationship between health and personal variables, interpersonal variables, perceived help and use of the social services. Relationships with the family, using a day center, and a sufficient and high perceived help of the social services were significant factors associated with good health. On the other hand, spending the day alone or using mental and health care services are associated with poor health. In the same way, the longer a person has been homeless, the worse their expected state of health is. Addressing housing exclusion, promoting interpersonal relationships, using a day center, and developing the use and perceived helpfulness of social services stand out as key factors in improving health status. Social policies are usually focused on housing. However, this paper also highlights the relevance of developing interpersonal relationships and using day centers to improve homeless people's health.


Subject(s)
Homeless Persons , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Housing , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Social Work
20.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 192, 2021 08 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Research indicates the adverse impacts of perceived discrimination on health, and discrimination inflamed by the COVID-19 pandemic, a type of social exclusion, could affect the well-being of the Chinese diaspora. We analyzed the relationship and pathways of perceived discrimination's effect on health among the Chinese diaspora in the context of the pandemic to contribute to the literature on discrimination in this population under the global public health crisis. METHODS: We analyzed data from 705 individuals of Chinese descent residing in countries outside of China who participated in a cross-sectional online survey between April 22 and May 9, 2020. This study utilized a structural equation model (SEM) to evaluate both direct and indirect effects of perceived discrimination on self-rated health (SRH) and to assess the mediating roles of psychological distress (namely, anxiety and depression) and social support from family and friends. RESULTS: This online sample comprised predominantly young adults and those of relatively high socioeconomic status. This study confirmed the total and direct effect of recently perceived discrimination on SRH and found the indirect effect was mainly mediated by depression. Mediating roles of anxiety and social support on the discrimination-health relationship were found insignificant in this SEM. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest discrimination negatively affected the well-being of the Chinese diaspora, and depression acted as a major mediator between the discrimination-health relationship. Therefore, interventions for reducing discrimination to preserve the well-being of the Chinese diaspora are necessary. Prompt intervention to address depression may partially relieve the disease burden caused by the surge of discrimination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Emigrants and Immigrants , Pandemics , Racism , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/ethnology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Racism/psychology , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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