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1.
Affilia - Journal of Women and Social Work ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244604

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 transformed frontline anti-violence workers' organizational routines by transitioning to virtual formats, decreasing face-to-face interactions, and shifting client needs. To address ever-changing workplace stressors, service providers adapted and/or modified coping mechanisms. In this paper, we analyze interviews with 23 anti-violence workers in the US Great Plains region, focusing on tactics used to avoid burnout and meet client needs. We discuss how workplace pace, direct-action coping practices, and a lack of inter/intra-agency social support impact how workers do their necessary jobs. Though some challenges were pervasive pre-pandemic, anti-violence workers' experiences also highlight how "post-COVID-19” workplaces must adequately support staffers. © The Author(s) 2023.

2.
Sustainability ; 15(11):9009, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20232517

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the globe, educational systems were forced to adapt to the new reality of online learning, causing practical academic specializations, such as social work (SW), to be severely affected. To highlight the perspectives of SW students during the pandemic, we used a mixed sociological approach that combined exploratory qualitative research (using the focus-group technique) with cross-sectional quantitative research. Participants who had both on-site and online SW studies before and after the COVID-19 outbreak were included in the study. The study was conducted during a period when almost all educational activities were held online. We aimed to investigate students' perceptions of the educational process during the pandemic, how their wellbeing was affected, and their perspectives on educational and professional development. Students identified advantages of online learning, such as discovering online learning tools, and disadvantages, mainly marked by concerns about their career path once practical activities were heavily limited by institutional measures and policies. Our conclusions suggest that in a post-pandemic context, universities should provide continuous feedback, integrate students' opinions into policies, offer material and technical support, facilitate access to high-quality resources, enrich the SW curricula with resilience programs, and organize peer-to-peer mentoring activities.

3.
Children & Schools ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20230872

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to understand the types of mental health supports described in school district reopening plans in one southeastern state, and to understand school social workers' involvement in developing these plans during the first full academic year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Publicly accessible school district reopening plans were collected from the 80 school districts in South Carolina, and 15 school social workers participated in virtual interviews. Out of the 80 school districts, 67 had reopening plans, and of those, only 43 percent mentioned mental health services and supports. Most school district reopening plans described Tier 1 universal prevention services and supports and a process for mental health assessment, identification, and referral. Fewer included Tier 2 early intervention and Tier 3 targeted and intensive services. Of the school social workers interviewed, only four were involved in helping to develop their school district reopening plans, and when involved, advocated for mental health services and supports for their students. The article concludes with a discussion of the study's implications for school social work practice.

4.
Qualitative Social Work ; 22(3):431-447, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2318175

ABSTRACT

The American education system has been significantly disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic, which led schools to shut down and convert to remote learning environments in spring 2020. However, long before these school closures, school social workers (SSWs) have faced significant practice dilemmas, as they have encountered obstacles to their engagement in best practices. While initial pandemic school closures presented SSWs with a range of uncertain situations, they also provided the possibility to respond to practice demands in different and dynamic ways. This article explores the pandemic's impact upon SSWs' practice, and how SSWs responded in turn as they quickly adapted their practice during this widespread, ongoing crisis. Informed by crisis theory, previous analyses of SSW practice trends and dilemmas, and a review of traditional social work values and ethics, we conducted three focus groups in July 2020 with SSWs during the pandemic's early months. From these interviews, we learned that participants' work was disrupted by dramatic shifts in school and community settings, as well as changes in support needs within their respective school communities. Those disruptions gave way to substantial shifts in practice, which reflect a more prominent role for systemic practice and for traditional social work values in SSW decision-making. These findings offer implications for post-pandemic practice, and practice in other host settings.

5.
Qualitative Social Work ; 22(3):448-464, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2314540

ABSTRACT

In the spring of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic spread around the globe. The viral outbreak was followed by rapid changes in people's everyday and working lives. Because of the wide-scale societal restrictions that took place to prevent the pandemic, social work was forced to take a digital leap. In this article, we examine Finnish social workers' experiences of extending the use of digitally mediated social work (DMSW) in working with clients during the first wave of the pandemic, the spring of 2020. The data consist of 33 social workers' personal diaries, which are analysed using a qualitative theory-based content analysis. Henri Lefebvre's theory of spatial triad will be utilised in theorising how social workers represent DMSW through three dimensions of space, that is, how they perceive, conceive and live digital spaces when encountering their clients and how physical, mental and social spaces are embodied in the representations. The results suggest that the three dimensions of space 1) basis of, 2) conceived and 3) lived DMSW intertwine closely together. The results reveal how the physical space, including IT infrastructure, its functionality and applicability, along with the organisational contexts, form a bedrock for the social workers' DMSW practice and had a decisive impact on their experiences. Second, the conceived space consists of workers' cognitive and emotional elements, such as competencies, preconceptions and attitudes towards ICT. Finally, the third dimension of spatiality concludes with the social and relational aspects of the user experiences and encounters between clients and social workers.

6.
Affilia: Feminist Inquiry in Social Work ; 38(2):263-277, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2298369

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 reached pandemic levels in March 2020, schools shifted to remote learning. Student parents in higher education had to adapt to their own remote learning and assume responsibility for childcare and their children's education. Few studies have explored the impact of COVID-19 on mothers who are also full-time students. This study utilized a phenomenological approach to understand the lived experiences of mothering students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Student mothers were recruited from a large, public, Hispanic-serving university in a Southern state. We conducted interviews with 15 student mothers who had at least one child under the age of 18 during the first six months of the pandemic. Three main themes emerged from the analyses: (1) successfully meeting educational requirements;(2) dealing with the mental health impact of the pandemic;and (3) changing the institutional structure. The first theme captured strategies mothering students implemented to ensure their own or their children's educational goals were met. The second theme encompassed how mothers handled the stress caused by the pandemic. The third theme explored ways that mothers resisted gendered expectations and norms around care. Implications for policy and social work practice include changing institutional structures to enhance support for mothering students.

7.
Journal of Social Work ; 21(2):246-256, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2306236

ABSTRACT

Summary: Social workers in China have been involved significantly in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This article introduces the innovative interdisciplinary remote networking framework which both provides a guide for medical and community social workers' involvement during the COVID-19 outbreaks, and also to support interdisciplinary collaboration with the aim of helping individuals and families in need during the pandemic. Findings: The implementation of interdisciplinary remote networking, developed by Chinese social workers, has effectively addressed the different domains of need experienced by the affected population and has established a new approach for social work in the field of health. The framework also provides an effective model for setting up a targeted and sustained service system that links social workers with psychological and medical resources, which capitalize on social resources to buffer the negative impacts of the disease. Social workers play an essential role during such a public health emergency, providing critical services for patients and families, medical workers, self-quarantined residents, and the general population. Applications: The service mode of interdisciplinary remote networking, based on the frontline experiences of social work interventions in China, may serve as a framework for combating COVID-19 in other countries. The framework is among the initiatives that provide transferrable skills to social work practitioners working in network-based social work services during public health emergencies. Thus, the framework presents implications for future practice development in both disaster social work and also public health social work. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

8.
British Journal of Social Work ; 53(2):1243-1262, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2268557

ABSTRACT

People with care and support needs were often badly affected by Covid-19, although the impact on people employing Personal Assistants (PAs) has not been addressed. We aimed to explore the experiences of people employing PAs during the pandemic to inform care systems and social work practice. Remote qualitative interviews were conducted with seventy PA employers across England in 2021–2022. Data were analysed thematically to explore salient themes. The Covid-19 pandemic elucidated role tensions of PA employers: Navigating care arrangements during a time of unprecedented uncertainty reinforced participants' role as an employer, but exposed some aspects of employment responsibilities and legal obligations that participants felt ill-equipped to manage. Reports of contact with or by social workers were few and not perceived as helpful. The often-informal nature of PA arrangements and its blurred relational boundaries affected participants' expectations of their PAs. PA employers would welcome support from social workers in their employment role and flexibility with care plans, albeit with greater autonomy over their Direct Payment (DP) budget to enhance the potential of this arrangement. In the context of declining DP uptake in England, our study offers some potential explanations for this, with suggestions for systemic change and social work practice.

9.
International Social Work ; 64(2):246-250, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2249401

ABSTRACT

Social work is challenged in Africa, given the colonial heritage of the remedial or casework model. Drawing on the fallouts of the COVID-19 pandemic, this article considers how social work could be well positioned to effectively respond to Africa's social problems. Although recent evidence illustrates that the profession is generally viewed in a positive light among many African people, there are calls for practitioners to be more assertive in responding to Africa's perennial social problems, aggravated by the current pandemic. Strategies for strengthening the quality of social work education and practice in Africa are explored. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Health, Risk and Society ; 25(1-2):28-44, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2275135

ABSTRACT

Within a context where New Public Management [NPM] has become increasingly influential in shaping everyday working practices, social workers often handle risks in their everyday work using formalised bureaucratic procedures, among other strategies. As the COVID-19 pandemic progressed, rapid changes occurred in Swedish elder care that social workers were required to address in their everyday work. Intra-professional case conferences amongst social workers provide one opportunity to discuss individual viewpoints and obtain suggestions from colleagues on how to proceed with a case. These discussions have so far received little scholarly attention. In this study we used a data set consisting of 39 audio-recorded case conferences to analyse social workers' intra-professional discussions about risks during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the case conferences, social workers discussed the risks that were accentuated by the pandemic, such as the risk of spreading COVID-19 to clients, the risk of unmet care needs amongst clients, risks related to accountability, and the risks pertaining to blurred boundaries between different organisations. The collegial discussions in case conferences included opportunities for social workers to use their collective professional experience and competency to establish creative solutions 'on the go' and to discuss various ways of handling and balancing different risks while continuing to carry out their work in the changing and unknown situation. Our findings highlight the importance of collegial support in social work in dealing with accentuated risks during the pandemic.Copyright © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

11.
Youth and Society ; 55(4):630-651, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2272314

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this qualitative study was to obtain youth perspectives on consensual and non-consensual sexting. We began this study on young people's (12–19) sexting practices in a large urban center. Before the study was put on pause due to COVID-19 physical distancing measures, we conducted 12 focus groups with 62 participants (47 girls, 15 boys). A key finding was that many girls had received unsolicited sexts (e.g., "dick pics”) or unwanted requests for sexts. Analysis revealed four interconnected themes: (1) unsolicited sexts;(2) unwanted requests for sexts;(3) complexity associated with saying "no”;and (4) general lack of adult support. Using our findings from before COVID-19, we discuss the potential impact of COVID-19 on teens' sexting experiences and outline the ways in which social workers and other mental health practitioners can support adolescents and their parents in navigating this new context of sexting during and beyond the global pandemic.

12.
Qualitative Social Work ; 22(2):197-199, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2254664
13.
Journal of Social Work ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2251763

ABSTRACT

Summary (methods and approach) : Social workers support clients' psychosocial and resource needs across care settings. Social workers are typically not, however, trained to engage in emergency response practices such as the ones that may be necessary to support needs brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. This article reports findings from a cross-sectional survey of social work students and recent graduates entering the field of social work during COVID-19, exploring their preparation, perceived readiness, and training needs. Findings : The study sample (N = 94) included 70 students and 24 recent graduates. The sample was 52% White, 22% Hispanic, and 21% Black/African American. Respondents reported training needs in the areas of trauma-informed care (70%), behavioral health (57%), culturally competent practice (49%), telehealth (48%), loss and grief (44%), and emergency management (43%). No significant differences emerged in self-efficacy ratings of students and recent graduates;both groups reported low self-efficacy in their ability to apply advanced practice skills. After controlling for demographics, receiving training specific to the COVID-19 pandemic (β =.271, p <.05), perceived readiness (β =.779, p <.001), and satisfaction with training/preparation (β =.4450, p <.001) significantly contribute to levels of perceived self-efficacy among SW students and recent graduates. Applications : Social work curricular developments, and continuing education, are needed to prepare and support emerging social workers for practice in the context of COVID-19 and its long-term implications. This includes enhancing social workers' readiness to engage in telehealth, trauma-informed practice, emergency management, policy interpretation, self-care, and grief support. © The Author(s) 2023.

14.
Journal of Social Work ; : 1, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2248140

ABSTRACT

Social workers are increasingly using digital technology and online platforms in service delivery, with many services having moved online in 2020 following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic. A systematic literature review was conducted to synthesize research on the benefits and uncertainties of technology-mediated social work practice. Relevant keywords were searched in the following databases, Scopus, EbscoHost, SocINDEX, and Google Scholar. A total of 28 articles were included in this review, and their findings were synthesized thematically.The review revealed several benefits of using digital tools and online platforms, including providing services to the larger population and making social work more available and accessible. However, while technology was widely employed in social work practice, there were some uncertainties about the impacts of technology on practice, maintaining professional boundaries, and concerns over privacy and confidentiality.There is a need for further support for social workers to access flexible, efficient, and creative tools to maintain the quality of service delivery. The interdisciplinary collaboration between social work bodies and organizations with technology developers will improve technology-mediated social work practice to be aligned with professional principles, ethics, and values. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Social Work is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

15.
International Social Work ; 66(1):45049.0, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2243848

ABSTRACT

An editorial is presented on International social work in the new era. Topics include number of infected cases being decreasing, the loss of life being reducing, and social and economic activities again started resuming;and globalization moving towards de-globalization and various supply chains such as human talents, financial capital, ideas, and information.

16.
British Journal of Social Work ; 53(1):386-404, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2241501

ABSTRACT

The rapid global spread of COVID-19 has put increased pressure on health and social service providers, including social workers who continued front line practice throughout the pandemic, engaging with some of the most vulnerable in society often experiencing multiple adversities alongside domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Movement restrictions and stay-at-home orders introduced to slow the spread of the virus, paradoxically leave these families at even greater risk from those within the home. Utilising a survey methodology combining both open- and closed-ended questions, this study captured a picture of social work practice in Ireland with families experiencing DVA during the early waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings highlight both the changes and challenges in work practices and procedures that limit social work assessment and quality contact with families, changes to the help-seeking behaviours from victims/survivors, as well as emerging innovative practice responses with enhanced use of technology. Implications for practice include an increased awareness of the risk and prevalence of DVA accelerated by the pandemic. Conclusions assert that social work assessment and intervention with families experiencing DVA must remain adaptive to the changing COVID-19 context and continue to develop innovative practice approaches.

17.
British Journal of Social Work ; 53(1):656-672, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2240880

ABSTRACT

Social work in Brazil advocates a radical and critical model of social work theorisation and practice. This article explores the Brazilian theoretical and practice model, identifying the profession as being in the vortex of Covid-19, increasing state economic austerity, attacks on previously hard-won progressive social policy and increasing inequality and precarity. This provides a challenging practice environment. The professional re-conceptualisation model proposes that social work needs to fully theorise social difficulties to ensure that the profession intervenes to address the causes of the problems, rather than manifestations underlying them. This is undertaken through aligning itself with working-class conflicts, promoting rights and refusing to accept the rolling back of support already won. The Brazilian framework, located within its social realities, offers an opportunity for social work globally to consider what lessons can be learnt, to recognise the uniqueness of its perspectives and provide solidarity through its recognition.

18.
Int Soc Work ; 66(1): 181-192, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242754

ABSTRACT

Through the lens of the theory of planned behavior, this article explores how social workers adapt to a new situation due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Three focus group sessions were conducted with 23 social workers from child and youth, family, and elderly services in Hong Kong. Three major themes were generated: (1) repositioning the social work profession, (2) renegotiating contracts with funders, and (3) exploring novel intervention methods. Implications of the findings are discussed. To ensure social workers can respond effectively in crises, an evolving nature of the profession is advocated to enshrine its spirit to serve.

19.
Soc Work ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239600

ABSTRACT

Social workers have engaged in promotive, preventive, and intervention work throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Given that social workers are disproportionately women, and the essential nature of practice during the pandemic, how social workers experience caretaking and financial stressors warrants examination. Data are drawn from a larger cross-sectional survey of U.S.-based social workers (N = 3,118) conducted from June to August 2020. A convergent mixed-methods design included thematic content analysis and univariate, ordinal, and linear regression models. The sample was 90 percent female; average age was 46.4 years. Although 44 percent indicated moderate or significant caretaking stress, results varied by race/ethnicity, workplace setting, and age. Social workers of color were more likely to report caretaking (p < .001) and financial stress (p < .001) compared with White counterparts. Social workers in children/family services were more likely to report increased financial stress (p < .004). Older age was protective for both caretaking (p < .001) and financial stress (p < .001). Three distinct subthemes were found in caretaking stress (work/life balance, safety concerns, and positionality) and two in financial stress (uncertainty and absence of workplace recognition). Understanding workforce stressors may help organizations and policymakers better support an essential workforce integral to the United States' COVID-19 response and recovery.

20.
Children & Schools ; 45(1):46-53, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2232357

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 outbreak, children and families in rural communities have been experiencing unprecedented long-term social isolation and insufficient access to mental health services. Prior to the pandemic, access to mental healthcare in rural communities was already inadequate, leading rural populations to be routinely underserved when facing significant social issues and mental health needs. Even though the pandemic has disrupted the traditional delivery of mental healthcare and exacerbated needs, isolated children and families in rural areas can benefit from mental health services through a telemental health approach. This article presents an innovative telemental health practice model that implements solution-focused brief therapy with social work interns in rural university-assisted community schools (UACS). Implications for policies supporting telemental health in rural UACS, social work education, and evaluation are presented. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

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