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1.
Ieee Access ; 10:98414-98426, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070262

ABSTRACT

It is imperative to understand human movement and behavior, from epidemic monitoring to complex communications. So far, most research and studies on investigating and interpreting human movements have traditionally depended on private and accumulated data such as mobile records. In this work, social network data is suggested as a proxy for human mobility, as it relies on a large amount of publicly accessible data. A mechanism for urban mobility mining and extraction scheme is proposed in this research to shed light on the importance and benefits of the publicly available social network data. Given the potential value of the Big Data obtained from social network platforms, we sought to demonstrate the process of analyzing and understanding human mobility patterns and activity behavior in urban areas through the social network data. Human mobility is far from spontaneous, follows well-defined statistical patterns. This research provides evidence of spatial and temporal regularity in human mobility patterns by examining daily individual trajectories of users covering an average time span of three years (2018 to 2020). Despite the diversity of individual movements history, we concluded that humans follow simple, reproducible patterns. Additionally, we studied and evaluated the effect of COVID-19 on human mobility and activity behavior in urban areas and established a strong association between human mobility and COVID-19 spread. Numerous years of mobility data analysis can reveal well-established trends, such as social or cultural activities, which serve as a baseline for detecting anomalies and changes in human mobility and activity behavior.

2.
Ieee Access ; 10:99150-99167, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070261

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had very negative effects on public transport systems. These effects have compromised the role they should play as enablers of social equity and environmentally sustainable mobility and have caused serious economic losses for public transport operators. For this reason, in the context of pandemics, meaningful epidemiological information gathered in the specific framework of these systems is of great interest. This article presents the findings of an investigation into the risk of transmission of a respiratory infectious disease in an intercity road transport system that carries millions of passengers annually. To achieve this objective, a data mining methodology was used to generate the data required to ascertain the level of risk. Using this methodology, the occupancy of vehicle seats by passengers was simulated using two different strategies. The first is an empirical approach to the behaviour of passengers when occupying a free seat and the second attempts to minimise the risk of contagion. For each of these strategies, the interactions with risk of infection between passengers were estimated, the patterns of these interactions on the different routes of the transport system were obtained using k-means clustering technique, and the impact of the strategies was analysed.

3.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12949, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066486

ABSTRACT

Pujon Kidul Village, Pujon District, Malang Regency, is an area with tourism potential that has been developed since 2017 with the concept of agricultural tourism. Throughout the development of tourism villages, Pujon Kidul Village has succeeded in accelerating economic growth and providing jobs for the community. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, tourism villages have been severely affected, leading to the temporary closure of tourist attractions and community businesses. This research aimed to identify what indicators form social capital variables and the relationship between social capital variables and community adaptation patterns in dealing with pandemics in the study location. This was quantitative research with confirmatory factor analysis to determine the indicators of forming social capital and structural equation modeling analysis to determine the relationship between the variables. Based on the findings, it is known that trust in forming a social network is 0.468. Furthermore, the social network forms community actions of 0.046 and influences community resilience by 0.007. Therefore, good social capital will make it easier for the community to participate in collective action as a form of caring for each other during the pandemic. This action also influences the community to survive in a pandemic crisis, thus creating an adaptation pattern for the Pujon Kidul Tourism Village community in facing a pandemic.

4.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 31: e72, 2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062137

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has harmed many people's mental health globally. Whilst the evidence generated thus far from high-income countries regarding the pandemic's impact on suicide rates is generally reassuring, we know little about its influence on this outcome in lower- and middle-income countries or among marginalised and disadvantaged people. There are some signals for concern regarding the pandemic's potentially unequal impact on suicide rates, with some of the affected demographic subgroups and regions being at elevated risk before the pandemic began. However, the evidence-base for this topic is currently sparse, and studies conducted to date have generally not taken account of pre-pandemic temporal trends. The collection of accurate, complete and comparable data on suicide rate trends in ethnic minority and low-income groups should be prioritised. The vulnerability of low-income groups will likely be exacerbated further by the current energy supply and cost-of-living crises in many countries. It is therefore crucial that reassuring messaging highlighting the stability of suicide rates during the pandemic does not lead to complacency among policymakers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Ethnicity , Humans , Minority Groups , Pandemics , Poverty , Suicide/psychology
5.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-344335

ABSTRACT

Background: There is growing evidence that the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately affected minority and lower socioeconomic groups. These groups have limited access to healthcare and social security, work in high-risk jobs, and have higher rates of comorbidities associated with poor outcomes from COVID-19. This study quantifies the effect of individual demographics, socioeconomic factors, and public health measures on COVID-19 health outcomes in a large population. Method: Demographics, socioeconomic factors, and COVID-19 outcomes for all 600,000 residents of the Sydney Local Health District from June 2021 to February 2022 were identified from the state’s Notifiable Conditions Information Management System (NCIMS) and linked to Australian Census data. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were generated for the outcomes of testing, infection, hospitalisation, and death for different periods of public health restrictions. Findings: Overall, public health interventions were effective in protecting the entire population from COVID-19 infection, hospitalisation, and death.During strict public health measures, older individuals had a lower risk of infection, with those aged 80 years and over having half the risk of infection compared to the reference group of 30 to 39 years old (hazards ratio 0.47, 95%CI 0.45-0.49);and those living in areas of lower socioeconomic status (SES) had a higher risk of infection, with the lowest areas having seven times the risk compared to the highest areas (HR 7.15, 6.24-8.19). The risk of infection was also higher for males (HR 1.34 1.27-1.40);those living in areas with higher household sizes (HR 1.56, 1.36-1.78);and individuals who were born in South Asia (HR 1.18, 1.07-1.29), South East Asia (HR 1.20, 1.07-1.36) and the Middle East and North Africa (HR 1.67, 1.47-1.90). During relaxed restrictions, differences between sexes, age groups, regions of birth and household sizes attenuated, but remained significant. Individuals with lower SES had lower rates of COVID-19 testing (odds ratio 0.31, 0.30-0.33), and higher odds of hospitalisation (OR 2.02, 1.71-2.38) and death (OR 4.11, 2.66-6.37) due to COVID-19. Individuals born outside of Australia had lower odds of testing, but no difference in the odds of hospitalisation or death. Importantly, vaccines were preferentially given to at-risk people, and these were protective of hospitalisation (OR 0.67, 0.61-0.73) and death (OR 0.70, 0.58-0.85). The Delta variant of COVID-19 was associated with higher odds of hospitalisation (OR 5.00, 0.56-4.76) and death (OR 4.17, 4.76-3.45). Interpretation: Policies adopted during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic were insufficient to maintain social equity. Policy and decision-makers should enhance efforts to achieve equity in relation to public health measures adopted for disease control. The challenge is to strengthen, scale, and sustain community engagement and relationships initiated during COVID-19 outbreaks. This can be part of a broader agenda that aims at enhancing clinical governance and community capacity to address the health and social inequalities of priority communities.

6.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(10): e38604, 2022 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virtual care use increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of that shift on patient and provider experiences is unclear. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated patient and provider experiences with virtual visits across an academic, ambulatory hospital in Toronto, Canada and assessed predictors of positive experience with virtual care. METHODS: Survey data were analyzed from consenting patients who attended at least one virtual visit (video or telephone) and from consenting providers who delivered at least one virtual visit. Distributions for demographic variables and responses to survey questions are reported, with statistical significance assessed using chi-square tests and t tests. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to identify any patient predictors of responses. RESULTS: During the study period, 253 patients (mean age 45.1, SD 15.6 years) completed 517 video visit surveys, and 147 patients (mean age 41.6, SD 16.4 years) completed 209 telephone visit surveys. A total of 75 and 94 providers completed the survey in June 2020 and June 2021, respectively. On a scale from 1 to 10 regarding likelihood to recommend virtual care to others, fewer providers rated a score of 8 or above compared with patients (providers: 62/94, 66% for video and 49/94, 52% for telephone; patients: 415/517, 80% for video and 150/209, 72% for telephone). Patients of non-White ethnicity had lower odds of rating a high score of 9 or 10 compared with White patients (odds ratio 0.52, 95% CI 0.28-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Patient experiences with virtual care were generally positive, but provider experiences were less so. Findings suggest potential differences in patient experience by ethnicity, warranting further investigation into equity concerns with virtual care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Middle Aged , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Ontario/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care , Hospitals
7.
Open House International ; 47(2):296-315, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2051897

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This paper aims to understand how the residents have utilized domestic spaces and furniture during three months' lockdown time for the Covid-19 virus spread measures and to explore how domestic living practices were adjusted which had been the daily urban activities previously.Design/methodology/approach>The research method is a qualitative interpretivist philosophical approach with a quantitative data collection. Short questionnaires were conducted via e-mails with attached links via SurveyMonkey. The sample was the group of people who had been in active urban life before the pandemic and had been actively working at the office spaces.Findings>Separate learning/working spaces were urged at home, at least for the set intervals in the daytime. Production in the kitchen also acted as an interactive production and entertainment. Balconies and terraces were re-discovered and acted as “urban-substitute open spaces”. The living room became the new venue for domestic interaction especially during working-learning breaks, for watching movies, personal care or reading sessions. Computers, tablets and smartphones became the urban activity base due to online meeting applications for social reasons, online shopping, working and learning. The separation of domains at home became essential.Research limitations/implications>The study only focuses domestic uses of white-collar workers;during the lock-down period, Covid-19 pandemic. Sampling constraints are the employees who were active urban life before the pandemic and working at the office space. Sharing the house at least with one other roommate, sibling or spouse with or without children. Individuals who had not been working outside the home before the pandemic, people aged over 65, retired, permanent home workers, housewives, freelancers and other such demographic structures are excluded from the study.Social implications>Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the first wave lockdown began between early March–June 2020, and millions of people were confined to the dwellings. “Staying home” stood for working-learning-shopping-interacting online, more production in the kitchen, using the living room as a domestic multi-functional venue, spending time on the terraces and balconies as domestic open spaces. The active living in the urban context dramatically shifted to “at-home living”.Originality/value>The study only focuses on the three months' interval in which strict rules for staying home were enforced in Istanbul, Turkey. Schemas, charts and tables are generated concerning the input. The study challenges the making meaning via praxis of “to dwell” and urban living. Nevertheless, the main questions of housing such as production, social aspects, shared spaces, interaction are re-configured and the substitute urban space is created at home.

8.
Coronavirus Drug Discovery: Volume 1: SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment ; : 267-311, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2048788

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to assess the impact of various nationalities, cultures, and religions on the spread of the coronavirus in the human environment. Particular attention was paid to compliance with legal and ethical standards during a pandemic. Different cultures, nationalities, and religions have a significant influence on the development and spread of the coronavirus in the world. During the COVID-19 pandemic, due to the tightening of legal standards, it is necessary to ensure: protection of patient confidentiality;of freedom of the expression;accesses to critical information;the opportunities to belong to social organizations and civil society;the accesses to professionals healthcare;ensure equal rights for women and guarantee the right to water and sanitation;continuity of humanitarian aid and targeted economic aid. Travel locks and bans should comply with legal standards;the right to education should be strictly respected. Artificial intelligence can be used in the fight against the crown. © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

9.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(10)2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043672

ABSTRACT

This study examined social characteristics and their relations to healthcare service demand among older adults during the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020. The sample was based on a cohort of 103,955 adults over the age of 65. A general index of needs was composed based on healthcare service use data and was predicted in a multi-nominal logistic regression. The frequency of the total needs significantly (p < 0.000) declined while supportive community services (4.9%, 2.0%), living in a community framework (27.0%, 15.2%), and living in a private residence (29.7%, 20.1%) were significantly associated (p < 0.000) with less frequent needs compared to the complementary groups. Supportive communities turned out to be an extremely important service for older adults. Policy makers should consider expanding supportive community services for older adults, as it was shown to have a positive correlation with lower healthcare service use, which might be an indicator of better overall health.

10.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-21, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035363

ABSTRACT

Following various precautionary measures as executed by the government to curb the transmission of COVID-19, erratic changes in the form of temporary lockdowns and movement restrictions have created an emergency phenomenon-panic buying. While such consequence has emerged as a timely and relevant topic, reviewed literature indicate an apparent oversight for portraying panic buying through the perspectives of impulsive and compulsive consumptions. Given the gap in the association between panic buying and consumers' emotional aspects within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study aspires to develop a contemporary measurement that accurately defines panic buying as a research variable. A combined methodology was hereby adopted, with the employment of qualitative inquiries towards the scale development of panic buying. Following this, quantitative data as collected from a total sample of 600 respondents through an online survey was analysed via both SPSS and AMOS statistical software towards scale assessment and hypothesis testing. Obtained findings uncovered the direct significance of both personal (fear, perceived risk, and perceived scarcity) and social (word-of-mouth and social media) factors on panic buying during the pandemic, whilst having indirect significance on the ensuing post-purchase regret. Impulsivity was further confirmed to exert a substantial moderating impact on the correlation between panic consumption and post-purchase emotional distress. Implications of the study are ultimately discussed.

11.
Sustainability ; 14(17):11066, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024218

ABSTRACT

Due to the actual level of carbon emissions, climate change causes disruptions in business process development and also affects human health. The obvious solution, which will ensure a future for the coming generations, is related to sustainable development (SD). Furthermore, by the effective intervention of ergonomics in organizational processes, risk management and social aspects will improve. In this article, we argue that it is not enough to only define an effective approach to greening an organization—managers and leaders need effective tools to monitor and control the implementation of the proposed approach. Thus, with this article, we aim to bring theoretical and applicative contributions to SD management and to propose a conceptual model for green companies based on an integrated management strategy and a complex assessment model (the LeadSUS assessment methodology). In the first phase, the proposed methodology is developed based on qualitative theoretical research, analysis, comparison, deductions, and conceptualization. The research results highlight important issues for defining the Green Enterprise Model, which is based on elements of the integrated strategy definition. In the second phase, the model, together with an associated methodology for the assessment of SD maturity level, supports the process of monitoring and controlling the implementation of the strategy. This approach is intended to create the conditions for the integrated management strategy and green enterprise configuration models. Furthermore, three case studies validate the proposed approach.

12.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10993, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024214

ABSTRACT

Cannabis consumption has become the center of much debate globally. The positive public perception of the medicinal benefits of cannabis and the rise of recreational usage of cannabis necessitate dramatic changes in cannabis reform policy. As a consequence, there is an increase in cannabis legalization around the globe, although it is still facing many rejections. It is crucial to understand the factors affecting public acceptance of cannabis use to support the contextualization and success of cannabis legalization. This review aims to address consumer cultural, social and psychological factors regarding the legal use of cannabis. Based on this review, cultures influence the endorsement or rejection of cannabis use depending on political views, religious sentiments and affiliated subcultures (adult, youth and adolescent subcultures). Regarding the social factors, socioeconomic status, measured by income, education level and occupation, is a key determinant of cannabis use. The beliefs opposing cannabis legalization are due to the negative stigma surrounding cannabis use. Nevertheless, growing awareness about the pharmaceutical and therapeutic effects of cannabis has led to an increase in positive attitudes towards cannabis legalization. Thus, dissemination of cannabis use benefits reaffirmed by scientific evidence could be a strategic way to alleviate the public’s negative feedback on cannabis legalization.

13.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10917, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024210

ABSTRACT

Rice is the staple food for 2.5 billion people worldwide and most farmers depend solely on rice for their livelihood. This study estimates how paddy ecosystem elasticity and external human activity affect paddy ecosystem sustainable food supply. In particular, we analyzed how sustainable food supply is affected by three key domains of external factors—ecological factors, including the proportion of paddy Area (Are), per capita cultivated land area (Lan), and annual wastewater discharge per capita (Was);economic factors, including the agricultural economy level (Inv) and urbanization rate (Urb);and social factors, including the education of farmers (Edu) and rural medical level (Med). We use ANEV, or net paddy ecosystem services value per unit area, to assess the sustainable food supply, which not only represents the food supply quantity and quality, but also the sustainability of the food supply. Results from our panel and threshold regressions suggest that Lan and Urb have a threshold effect on paddy ANEV;Are, Was, Inv, and Edu have a linear negative correlation with ANEV;and Med has a positive linear correlation with ANEV. Based on our findings, we lay out a series of recommendations that may guide future formulation of policies on paddy ecosystem protection and sustainable food supply.

14.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10856, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024205

ABSTRACT

Ongoing urbanization has led to the continuous expansion of built-up areas;as a result, open space is under great threat. Despite the wealth of studies conducted on open spaces, there is still a further need to further investigate the morphology of open space, particularly in an effort to understand the trends and drivers of open space morphological transformation that remain under-researched. Besides, although the previous literature has highlighted several factors influencing urban space morphology, it remains unclear how those key drivers interact. In this article, the PRISMA methodology was used to conduct a systematic literature review, screening and selecting articles from three primary databases (Web of Science, Elsevier, and Scopus). In total, 47 journal articles covering the years 2000 to 2022 were selected for the final review to identify key factors that influence open space morphology, including natural geographical factors, socioeconomic factors, and government policy factors. The results indicate that, as cities developed, the size of green spaces decreased, their structure fragmented, and their distribution became progressively less connected. Meanwhile, socioeconomic determinants played a greater role in influencing changes in green spaces than natural geographical factors and policy management factors. In addition, carrying out the present study confirmed that Landsat remote-sensing data with landscape metrics is a powerful research method for studying green space change. A research framework is offered in this paper to illustrate an understanding of which factors influence the dynamics of green spaces, identify the interaction mechanisms, and provide an optimization strategy of urban open space for urban planners or policymakers.

15.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10852, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024204

ABSTRACT

There has been a gradual shift over the years towards the use of social networking sites (SNS) in formal and informal English language learning which was accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Though there is an abundance of articles dedicated to probing into the in-depth use of SNS in English language learning, a clear correlation between the formal and informal application of SNS in English language learning is still scarce. Therefore, this systematic review aims to exhaustively analyse the recent findings regarding the integration of SNS in English language learning in both formal and informal learning contexts. Two databases were employed, which are the Web of Science (WoS) and Educational Resources Information Centre (ERIC) and thirty articles were extracted for further review. These articles were selectively restricted to a five-year (2018–2022) range and have been screened for any contradiction against the research objectives. As an overview, SNS is favoured for different kinds of applications in teaching and learning purposes due to observed improvements in overall language skills, social interactions, motivation and flexibility. It is proposed for future researchers to focus on a specific target group as well as specific SNS platforms which could help the researchers to minimize discrepancies.

16.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10590, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024182

ABSTRACT

Farmer practices may influence the microbial quality and safety of fresh produce. The increasing demands to create ready-to-eat (RTE) fresh produce while providing potential niche markets for smallholder farmers might be contributing to increased numbers of fresh produce-associated foodborne disease outbreaks. This study determined the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and farmer hygiene practices of farmers using open-ended questionnaires and key informant interviews. Additionally, the relationships between farmer socioeconomic characteristics and hygiene practices were statistically analyzed. The semi-organic smallholder farmer population and the farmworkers of the organic farm were female-dominated. Tertiary education was a predominant characteristic in the organic and semi-conventional workforces. While the semi-organic and semi-conventional farms relied on a combination of ‘store-bought’ synthetic and composted organic fertilizers, the organic farm owner only used composted organic fertilizer. The irrigation water sources varied amongst the farm types. However, most of the semi-organic farmers did not pre-treat irrigation water prior to use. The irrigation water source and fertilizer type selected by farmers varied and might affect the microbial quality and safety of fresh produce. Socioeconomic factors such as gender and education may influence farmer hygiene practices. These characteristics should therefore be considered when planning farmer support interventions.

17.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10480, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024174

ABSTRACT

Due to the advances in digital technology, the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) concept has been transformed into the digital environmental, social, and corporate governance (DESG) model, which can be realized as a potentially vital strategic movement for sustainable business practices in the contemporary digital era. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical research evidence on how firms’ DESG practices impact customers’ attitudes and brand equity. The purposes of this study were (1) to investigate the effect of DESG initiatives on customers’ attitudes (CA) and brand equity (BE), and (2) to explore how those impacts vary based on the diversity of socio-economic attributes. An online survey was conducted, and the data were analyzed by a structural equation modeling (SEM) technique. Based on 212 samples of Thai citizens’ experiences with firms’ DESG initiatives, the results revealed that DESG has a significant positive direct effect on CA. The mediation analysis revealed that CA fully mediated the relationship between DESG and BE. The results of a second-order confirmatory factor analysis of the DESG construct found that the digital social dimension (b = 0.775) played the strongest role in explaining DESG, followed by the digital environmental (b = 0.768) and digital governance (b = 0.718) dimensions. The moderation analysis found that the impact of DESG on CA was stronger for younger groups than older populations. Additionally, the group with a higher formal education level seemed to exhibit higher levels of CA than those with a lower level. Our study is one of a few endeavors to clarify the effects of DESG from the customer’s side, and suggests several implications and recommendations.

18.
Sustainability ; 14(16):9990, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024125

ABSTRACT

Environmental problems due to human activities such as deforestation, urbanisation, and large scale intensive farming are some of the major factors behind the rapid spread of many infectious diseases. This in turn poses significant challenges not only in as regards providing adequate healthcare, but also in supporting healthcare workers, medical researchers, policy makers, and others involved in managing infectious diseases. These challenges include surveillance, tracking of infections, communication of public health knowledge and promotion of behavioural change. Behind these challenges lies a complex set of factors which include not only biomedical and population health determinants but also environmental, climatic, geographic, and socioeconomic variables. While there is broad agreement that these factors are best understood when considered in conjunction, aggregating and presenting diverse information sources requires effective information systems, software tools, and data visualisation. In this article, we argue that interactive maps, which couple geographical information systems and advanced information visualisation techniques, provide a suitable unifying framework for coordinating these tasks. Therefore, we examine how interactive maps can support spatial epidemiological visualisation and modelling involving distributed and dynamic data sources and incorporating temporal aspects of disease spread. Combining spatial and temporal aspects can be crucial in such applications. We discuss these issues in the context of support for disease surveillance in remote regions, utilising tools that facilitate distributed data collection and enable multidisciplinary collaboration, while also providing support for simulation and data analysis. We show that interactive maps deployed on a combination of mobile devices and large screens can provide effective means for collection, sharing, and analysis of health data.

19.
Land ; 11(8):1161, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023849

ABSTRACT

Green and blue infrastructure, nature-based solutions, and cultural and built heritage play a key role in enhancing ecosystem services provision and shaping urban quality and communities’ wellbeing calling for an integrated approach to ecosystem services in urban policy and planning and decision-making. On the other side, under-used spaces and buildings have social, cultural, economic, as well as ecological functions and benefits, which are essential to sustainable urban development. The EU has been developing and implementing policies for an integrated approach to urban development and sustainable land use through the implementation of the Urban Agenda for the EU and fourteen associated Partnerships. Thus, it engaged a broad range of institutions and stakeholders across Europe in promoting local projects and sharing best practices on sustainable land use and nature-based solutions, the circular economy, and cultural heritage. This paper reviews the experiences of cities involved in the Partnerships of the Urban Agenda for the EU by illustrating how they related to different modes of ecosystem governance and associated challenges, discussing how three case studies integrate different dimensions of ecosystem services and regeneration in under-used areas and what type of knowledge as well as regulation and governance modes they have developed for supporting innovation in land use planning and management for urban ecosystem services. The results show that appropriate alternative regulations and policies are little explored and that cities adopt an integrated approach, combining cultural, environmental, economic, and social dimensions in their interventions, directly or indirectly enhancing the benefits of built and natural heritage and urban ecosystems in under-used areas. However, some issues, such as nature-based solutions and climate change, are still partially integrated into the projects while priority is given to the cultural, aesthetic, and economic dimensions.

20.
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information ; 11(8):429, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023727

ABSTRACT

Evaluating park equity can help guide the advancement of sustainable and equitable space policies. Previous studies have mainly considered accessibility when evaluating park equity while ignoring the selectivity and convenience of entering parks and residents’ recognition of parks. Measuring equity based mainly on spatial thinking has resulted in the social aspects of parks receiving insufficient attention. In this study, we therefore integrated the spatial and social equity of parks and developed a multidimensional framework to evaluate park equity in four dimensions: accessibility (Ai), diversity (Di), convenience (Ci), and satisfaction (Si). Empirical analysis from Yangzhou, China showed that: (1) in Yangzhou’s built-up districts, 23.43% of the communities received high- or relatively high-level park access but 17.72% received little or no park access. (2) The Gini coefficient indicated that all three dimensions showed a mismatch with population distribution, except for satisfaction (Si), which showed a relatively reasonable match. (3) Park access was generally better in communities with better locations, environments, and facilities. High-income groups enjoyed significantly better park access than low- and middle-income groups. These findings could help urban planners and policymakers develop effective policies to reduce inequality in park access.

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