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1.
Prev Med Rep ; : 102021, 2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069573

ABSTRACT

To date, there has been limited data available to understand the associations between race/ethnicity and socioeconomic and related characteristics with novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination in the United States. We leveraged the large, nationally-representative cross-sectional surveys of the U.S. Household Pulse Survey between January and March 2021 with relatively complete race/ethnicity and socioeconomic data to examine national trends in levels of COVID-19 vaccine initiation and intention in adults aged 18-85 years. We further estimated the multivariable associations between race/ethnicity, education, income, and financial hardship with the adjusted prevalence odds ratios of: 1) receipt of ≥1 COVID-19 vaccine dose; and 2) among those unvaccinated, the definite intention to receive a vaccine. We observed persistent disparities in vaccine initiation for non-Hispanic Blacks, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic multiracial/other race persons, and vaccine intention for Blacks and multiracial/other race persons, compared to non-Hispanic Whites and Asians. In late March 2021, the prevalence estimates of Hispanics and Blacks receiving a vaccine were 12-percentage points and 8-percentage points lower than for Whites, respectively. Education and income exhibited dose-response relationships with vaccine initiation (P for trend≤.01 and <.001, respectively). Substantial financial hardship was linked to 35-44% lower adjusted odds of vaccination (P<.001). In this large, nationally-representative study, we found persistent racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in vaccine initiation and intention, more than three months after COVID-19 vaccines first became available. Addressing these persistent racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequities in vaccination is essential to mitigate the pandemic's higher risks of infection and adverse health outcomes in Hispanic, Black, and socioeconomically-disadvantaged communities.

2.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102267, 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069007

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the trend in life expectancy (LE), healthy life expectancy (HLE) and socio-economic inequalities by neighbourhood in Barcelona from the pre-pandemic period (2018-2019) to the pandemic period (2020-2021). METHOD: LE and HLE at birth were computed using the municipal register of inhabitants and quality of life (EuroQol) from the Barcelona Health Survey of 2016. Inequalities were assessed with the gap between quantiles of neighbourhood income. RESULTS: In 2020, there was a reduction in LE among men (-1.98 years) and women (-2.44) and in HLE among men (-1.44). Socio-economic inequalities in LE and HLE between neighbourhoods widened since 2019 to 2021 (LE: from 3.92 to 4.86 years for men, and from 1.30 to 3.60 for women; HLE: from 6.88 to 7.70 years for men, and from 7.85 to 9.31 for women). CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has substantially reduced LE and HLE, with larger effects among low-income neighbourhoods, especially among women.

3.
Insan ve Toplum ; 10(4):413-444, 2020.
Article in Turkish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067231

ABSTRACT

Inequalities based on income and economy and "social inequalities" that directly affect society are not well understood.Therefore, inequalities with different components are measured and studied at best. Social inequality;due to the development of new situations, events and problems, it creates a relatively new set of dimensions, expectations and results. Social inequality;Due to the development of new situations, events and problems, it creates a relatively new set of dimensions, expectations and results. New developments, enlargements and contractions experienced at global and national scale revealed that inequality in education should be discussed again. In this study, on the basis of rural-urban distinctions and socioeconomic differences, the inequalities that emerged in digital education during the Covid-19 pandemic were examined. Depending on these two distinctions, it is aimed to reveal the inequalities in the access and use of digital media, internet and information communication technologies (D-ICT) of university students who try to participate in distance education at home during the epidemic process. A total of 16 students selected from 3 different universities according to age, gender, place of residence, class and socioeconomic status were included in the study. In the research where qualitative method was applied, the data were obtained through in-depth interviews. Interview data were categorized and converted into themes using the Maxqda qualitative data analysis program. The categories and themes combined as a result of open, axial and selective coding were visualized. The individual and family characteristics of the participants, the environment and financial resources of schools, development, emancipation and acculturation factors interactively have effects on inequality, as well as rural-urban segregation and socioeconomic differentiation are evident in digital education inequality. Gelir ve ekonomi temelli eşitsizliklerin yanı sıra toplumu doğrudan etkileyen “sosyal eşitsizlikler” de yeterince anlaşılamamıştır. Bu nedenle farklı bileşenlerle eşitsizlikler en iyi ihtimalle ölçülmekte ve incelenmektedir. Sosyal eşitsizlik;yeni durum, olay ve sorunların gelişmesi nedeniyle göreceli olarak bir dizi yeni boyut, beklenti ve sonuç ortaya çıkarmaktadır. Küresel ve ulusal ölçekte yaşanan yeni gelişme, genişleme ve daralmalar, eğitimde eşitsizliğin tekrar tartışılması gerektiğini ortaya çıkarmıştır. Bu çalışmada da kırsal-kentsel ayrımlar ile sosyoekonomik farklılaşmalar temelinde Covid-19 salgını sürecinde dijital eğitimde ortaya çıkan eşitsizlikler incelenmiştir. Bu iki ayrıma bağlı olarak salgın sürecinde evde uzaktan eğitime katılmaya çalışan üniversite öğrencilerinin dijital medya, internet, bilgi ve iletişim teknolojilerine (DÍB) erişim ve kullanımlarındaki eşitsizliklerin ortaya çıkarılması amaçlanmıştır. Yaş, cinsiyet, ikamet yeri, okuduğu sınıf ve sosyoekonomik statüsüne göre 3 ayrı üniversiteden seçilen toplam 16 öğrenci araştırmaya dâhil edilmiştir. Nitel yöntemin uygulandığı araştırmada, veriler, derinlemesine görüşmelerle elde edilmiştir. Görüşme verileri, Maxqda nitel veri analiz programıyla kategorileştirilmiş ve temalara dönüştürülmüştür. Açık, eksenel ve seçici kodlama neticesinde birleştirilen kategori ve temalar görselleştirilmiştir. Katılımcıların bireysel ve aile özellikleri, okulların çevresi ve mali kaynak durumları, kalkınma, özgürleşme, kültürlenme faktörleri etkileşimli şekilde eşitsizliği ortaya çıkarıcı etkiye sahip olduğu gibi dijital eğitim eşitsizliğinde kırsal-kentsel ayrım ve sosyoekonomik farklılaşmaların belirgin olduğu görülmektedir.

4.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12794, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066463

ABSTRACT

Consumption is an important concept in economics and many social sciences. The aim of the study is to compare consumption in European households in the years 2004–2020 and to identify groups of countries with similar consumption–expenditure structures. Statistical methods were used: trend analysis, cluster analysis. Between 2004 and 2019, the consumption expenditures of European households gradually increased. In all countries, spending on categories such as food, housing maintenance, and food and accommodation rose. Most countries also saw an increase in spending on other categories of consumer goods and services, although there were also countries where some types of spending decreased during the period under study. Our research grouped countries according to their consumption structure in 2004, 2019 and 2020. In Europe, several groups of countries can be distinguished according to their consumption structure. Similarities between EU countries’ consumption change through time. Ward’s clustering and k-means methods allowed to reduce a large number of countries to a few basic groups, which can be perceived as the subject and direction of further analysis.

5.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12618, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066437

ABSTRACT

The global expansion of urbanization is posing associated environmental and socioeconomic challenges. The capital city of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, is also facing similar threats. The development of urban green infrastructures (UGIs) are the forefront mechanisms in mitigating these global challenges. Nevertheless, UGIs in Addis Ababa are degrading and inaccessible to the city residents. Hence, a 56 km long Addis River Side Green Development Project is under development with a total investment of USD 1.253 billion funded by Chinese government aid. In phase one of this grand project, Friendship Square Park (FSP), was established in 2019 with a total cost of about USD 50 million. This paper was initiated to describe the establishment process of FSP and assess its social, economic, and environmental contributions to the city. The establishment process was described in close collaboration with the FSP contractor, China Communications Construction Company, Ltd. (CCCC). The land use changes of FSP’s development were determined by satellite images, while its environmental benefits were assessed through plant selection, planting design, and seedling survival rate. Open and/or close ended questionnaires were designed to assess the socioeconomic values of the park. The green space of the area has highly changed from 2002 (8.6%) to 2019 (56.1%) when the park was completed. More than 74,288 seedlings in 133 species of seedlings were planted in the park. The average survival rate of these seedlings was 93%. On average about 500 people visit the park per day, and 400,000 USD is generated, just from the entrance fee, per annum. Overall, 100% of the visitors were strongly satisfied with the current status of the park and recommended some additional features to be included in it. In general, the park is contributing to the environmental and socioeconomic values of the city residents, and this kind of park should be developed in other sub-cities of the city as well as regional cities of Ethiopia to increase the aesthetic, environmental and socioeconomic values of the country, at large.

6.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(11): 2243-2252, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065411

ABSTRACT

Evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout on socioeconomic COVID-19-related inequalities is scarce. We analyzed associations between socioeconomic deprivation index (SDI) and COVID-19 vaccination, infection, and hospitalization before and after vaccine rollout in Catalonia, Spain. We conducted a population-based cohort study during September 2020-June 2021 that comprised 2,297,146 adults >40 years of age. We estimated odds ratio of nonvaccination and hazard ratios (HRs) of infection and hospitalization by SDI quintile relative to the least deprived quintile, Q1. Six months after rollout, vaccination coverage differed by SDI quintile in working-age (40-64 years) persons: 81% for Q1, 71% for Q5. Before rollout, we found a pattern of increased HR of infection and hospitalization with deprivation among working-age and retirement-age (>65 years) persons. After rollout, infection inequalities decreased in both age groups, whereas hospitalization inequalities decreased among retirement-age persons. Our findings suggest that mass vaccination reduced socioeconomic COVID-19-related inequalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Spain/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Vaccination Coverage , Socioeconomic Factors , Vaccination
7.
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society ; 2022, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064325

ABSTRACT

Africa’s first COVID-19 case was recorded in Egypt on February 14, 2020. Although it is not as expected by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other international organizations, currently a large number of Africans are getting infected by the virus. In this work, we studied the trend of the COVID-19 outbreak generally in Africa as a continent and in the five African regions separately. The study also investigated the validity of the ARIMA approach to forecast the spread of COVID-19 in Africa. The data of daily confirmed new COVID-19 cases from February 15 to October 16, 2020, were collected from the official website of Our World in Data to construct the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model and to predict the trend of the daily confirmed cases through STATA 13 and EViews 9 software. The model used for our ARIMA estimation and prediction was (3, 1, 4) for Africa as a continent, ARIMA (3, 1, 3) for East Africa, ARIMA (2, 1, 3) for West Africa, ARIMA (2, 1, 3) for Central Africa, ARIMA (1, 1, 4) for North Africa, and ARIMA (4, 1, 5) for Southern Africa. Finally, the forecasted values were compared with the actual number of COVID-19 cases in the region. At the African level, the ARIMA model forecasted values and the actual data have similar signs with slightly different sizes, and there were some deviations at the subregional level. However, given the uncertain nature of the current COVID-19 pandemic, it is helpful to forecast the future trend of such pandemics by employing the ARIMA model.

8.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1893, 2022 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to mitigate transmission resulted in sudden and widespread socioeconomic disruptions including school and child care closures, unemployment and underemployment, and housing precarity. Understanding the extent to which these disruptions may have contributed to adverse health outcomes is critical for establishing policy priorities that can mitigate further harm. METHODS: We explored the associations between pandemic-related child care, employment, and housing disruptions with depressive symptoms, self-rated health, and food security status among a sample of economically disadvantaged and racially diverse female caregivers of young children (n=464). Data were derived from the Assessing California Communities' Experiences with Safety Net Supports (ACCESS) study, which conducted survey-based interviews with California caregivers with low-income from August 2020 - May 2021. We implemented a series of multivariable Poisson regressions with robust standard errors to assess the potency of each exposure, independently and within the context of one another. RESULTS: Most caregivers experienced disruptions to child care (70%) and employment (63%); few experienced major housing disruptions (8%). Women that experienced child care and housing disruptions had greater depressive symptoms, lower self-rated health, and greater food insecurity, although the relationships for housing and depressive symptoms were modified by the timing of participants' interviews. Employment disruptions were not associated with any of the examined adverse health outcomes. CONCLUSION: In the wake of socioeconomic stressors brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, attending to structural deficits in the child care system and increasing housing supports may be critical for protecting the health of caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Food Supply , Humans , Poverty
9.
Japan Medical Journal ; - (5059):18-32, 2021.
Article in Japanese | Ichushi | ID: covidwho-2057814
10.
Health Reports ; 31(4):22-27, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2057793

ABSTRACT

Background: While the physical health implications of the COVID-19 pandemic are regularly publicly available, the mental health toll on Canadians is unknown. This article examines the self-perceived mental health of Canadians during the COVID-19 pandemic and explores associations with various concerns after accounting for socioeconomic and health factors. Data: The cross-sectional Canadian Perspectives Survey Series 1 collected information related to COVID-19 in late March and early April 2020 concerning labour market participation, behaviours, and health for the Canadian population 15 years and older living in the 10 provinces. Methods: Socioeconomic and health characteristics of respondents as well as concerns about the impact of COVID-19 were examined to determine differences in experiencing excellent or very good compared to good, fair or poor perceived mental health. Results: Just over half of Canadians aged 15 and older (54%) reported excellent or very good mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Several concerns were also associated with mental health. Notably, after considering the effects of socioeconomic and health characteristics, women, youth, individuals with a physical health condition and those who were very or extremely concerned with family stress from confinement were less likely to report excellent or very good mental health. Interpretation: These findings point to particular risks for lower perceived mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results highlight various concerns of Canadians which may be associated with mental health, in particular, family stress in the home.

11.
Handbook of rural, remote, and very remote mental health ; : 191-215, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2048165

ABSTRACT

There is a growing burden of disease nationally and internationally from mental illness, both as a stand-alone problem and also comorbid with the growing epidemic of chronic, non-communicable diseases. The advent of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020 and ongoing climate change sequelae have exacerbated these mental health risks exponentially, creating massive service delivery dilemmas globally. In many countries, people in regional and particularly rural and remote areas, bear a greater disease burden from mental health conditions, due largely to the unique stressors inherent in rural life and inequitable access to appropriate services. This chapter canvases these issues and includes a brief discussion of optimally integrated care, risk factors and needs specific to rural people, the impact of Indigeneity, the role of socioeconomic factors in general and mental health, and inequity of access to primary mental healthcare services. These factors are illustrated by focusing on Australia as a case study, exemplifying both generic characteristics and those unique to that country that are relevant to service delivery in rural areas. The chapter was accepted for publication prior to Australia's worst bushfires on record (in the summer of 2019-2020), subsequent floods in early 2020, and the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic in February-March 2020 (ongoing). Most of the highlighted factors, however, remain the same -albeit greatly exacerbated by these extraordinary events. Information is provided in relation to the distribution of four relevant mental health specialties, with recommendations made-specific to Australia and also in the global context-with regard to optimally integrated primary mental health care.Across the settled world, there is a huge need to systematically roll-out integrated mental health services, using a number of modalities, to meet rural need. It is recommended that changes include: interprofessional education to facilitate team-based care;co-location of multidisciplinary primary healthcare teams;development and integration of culturally appropriate health services for Indigenous clients;mapping of required services in regional, rural, and remote areas;and optimal and strategic use of available funding and telehealth options. It is also strongly recommended that integration of lifestyle interventions be included in all mental health treatment, to facilitate optimal outcomes. These initiatives are now particularly pertinent, given the post-COVID "mental health pandemic" predicted by health experts globally. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
The Lancet ; 400(10358):1096-1097, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2050106

ABSTRACT

Protection includes access to pharmacies and health-care services, information, resources, people, and goods that can shape one's life or lead to one's death. The 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia was thought by some, including physician and signer of the US Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Rush, to originate from rotten coffee grounds left in the port. Long known as the “stranger's disease” due to misguided perceptions that only visitors and outsiders harboured yellow fever and brought it to New Orleans and other places, Olivarius takes a different approach in arguing that only the so-called acclimated were bestowed with vestiges of power in the form of local capital, networking opportunities, recognition from local credit houses and businesses, and status. While some public officials attempted to mitigate the potential impact of voting in the election by calling for increased access to mail-in ballots and more accessible and safer polling places, for instance, others hoped the impacts of COVID-19 might suppress “unwanted” voters from participating in the election.

13.
The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ; 95(2):257-263, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046356

ABSTRACT

While vaccine hesitancy is well documented in the literature among the Latinx community, little attention or effort is given to the nuances among the members of individual communities, such as country of origin, immigration status, generational status, primary language, race, age, sex, gender, or rural residence and how these complexities affect vaccine messaging and uptake. We have evidence that this heterogeneity causes differences in access to healthcare, attitudes towards vaccines, and degree of health disparities. In this review we will describe their impact on vaccination rates in the Latinx community, highlighting missed opportunities for public health outreach, and how targeted messaging could improve vaccine uptake.

14.
Journal of Services Research ; 22(1):91-124, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045519

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of socio-demographic factors and investment awareness among working women to assess their financial literacy. Socio-demographic variables like gender, age, education, and income are found to have a significant influence on financial literacy. In the past, limited studies were conducted analysing the relationship between being a working woman and their socio-economic factors. With changing times and the massive overall impact of Covid-19 epidemic, the need for financial literacy has grown incalculably. Lakhs of people were laid-off leaving them with no job opportunities to choose from. The need is especially significant for women and other minorities who continue to face financial hardships and uncertainty. With so many people facing unprecedented financial problems, financial literacy is a priority right now. The study contributes to the current literature relating to financial literacy among working women, focusing on the aspect in Indore city. Data was collected using primary research. The data in this research was collected from journals, survey reports and websites. Primary data was collected through the online distribution of the questionnaire.

15.
Revista de Ciencias Sociales ; - (174):143-165,263, 2021.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045254

ABSTRACT

En este artículo se busca identificar los determinantes en el cambio del riesgo de hospitalización con y sin intubación respecto a la atención ambulatoria de acuerdo a condiciones de indigenismo con covid-19 al inicio de la pandemia. Con información de la Secretaría de Salud de México del 22 de mayo de 2020 se elaboran modelos logísticos multinomiales para ambos grupos de pacientes, ajustando por variables socioeconómicas, condiciones de salud y lugar de residencia.Alternate :Identify the determinants of the change in the risk of hospitalization with and without and with intubation with respect to outpatient care in indigenous and non-indigenous patients according to conditions of indigenism with covid-19 at the beginning of the pandemic. With information from the Ministry of Health of Mexico on May 20, 2020, multinomial logistic models are developed for both groups of patients, adjusting for socioeconomic variables, health conditions and place of residence that show common conditions such as pneumonia and others, as well as residence in large cities for indigenous people due to their migration.

16.
Environ Res ; 214(Pt 3): 114020, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035991

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the economic and mental health impacts of COVID-19 in the presence of previous exposure to flooding events. METHODS: Starting in April 2018, the Texas Flood Registry (TFR) invited residents to complete an online survey regarding their experiences with Hurricane Harvey and subsequent flooding events. Starting in April 2020, participants nationwide were invited to complete a brief online survey on their experiences during the pandemic. This study includes participants in the TFR (N = 20,754) and the COVID-19 Registry (N = 8568) through October 2020 (joint N = 2929). Logistic regression and generalized estimating equations were used to examine the relationship between exposure to flooding events and the economic and mental health impacts of COVID-19. RESULTS: Among COVID-19 registrants, 21% experienced moderate to severe anxiety during the pandemic, and 7% and 12% of households had difficulty paying rent and bills, respectively. Approximately 17% of Black and 15% of Hispanic households had difficulty paying rent, compared to 5% of non-Hispanic white households. The odds of COVID-19 income loss are 1.20 (1.02, 1.40) times higher for those who previously had storm-related home damage compared to those who did not and 3.84 (3.25-4.55) times higher for those who experienced Harvey income loss compared to those who did not. For registrants for whom Harvey was a severe impact event, the odds of having more severe anxiety during the pandemic are 5.14 (4.02, 6.58) times higher than among registrants for whom Harvey was a no meaningful impact event. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple crises can jointly and cumulatively shape health and wellbeing outcomes. This knowledge can help craft emergency preparation and intervention programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cyclonic Storms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Floods , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
17.
The Canadian Journal of Regional Science ; 45(2):89, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2034092

ABSTRACT

The digital divide in Canada has gained significant attention from policymakers and the public in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic enhances the vulnerability of residents in rural and Indigenous communities that lack highspeed Internet access which affects their residents' ability to participate in an online work and learning environment. However, digital inequalities also remain an issue in urban settings despite the physical infrastructure that is usually in place to connect to high-speed Internet. The federal government has launched several funding initiatives at the end of 2020;however, this paper argues that the current federal policy strategy to address the digital divide is insufficient. By drawing on the intersectional character of the digital divide, which is interlinked with other types of socio-economic inequalities, this paper investigates why the federal broadband development approach remains problematic. As the digital divide in Canada persists, this paper explores current federal funding initiatives and their effectiveness in supporting broadband deployment across rural and Indigenous communities. The analysis shows inequalities regarding broadband access and funding distribution in Canada which also stem from a lack of democratic efficacy during federal hearings.

18.
Journal of Urban and Regional Analysis ; 14(2):187-210, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026707

ABSTRACT

The rapid growth of home-based work raises questions about its long-term impacts on neighbourhoods and cities. By removing the need to commute, home-based work has the potential to advance the New Urbanism aspirations of walkable neighbourhoods in an urban village format where people live, work and play. Nonetheless, the uneven distribution of this emerging work practice, strongly associated with the socio-economic status of neighbourhoods, is exacerbating the risk of increased urban inequalities. This paper presents pre- and post-COVID data for the City of Gold Coast, Australia, and it discusses the urban distribution of home-based work by analysing the home-based workers' locational preferences, their daily movement patterns, the preferred built environment outcomes, and the urban design features. The findings suggest that certain social and economic interactions tend to increase with the growth of remote work. These interactions, magnified by the COVID pandemic, offer opportunities to advance the New Urbanism aspirations of cohesive, walkable communities and neighbourhoods.

19.
British Journal of Child Health ; 3(4):199-203, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025625

ABSTRACT

The last years have been characterised by disasters and tragic events, leading to an extremely negative news cycle. Stephanie Thornton discusses the impact this can have on children and young people's mental health and wellbeing.

20.
Canadian Social Work Review ; 39(1):27-43, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025303

ABSTRACT

On March 13, 2020, Mount Royal University responded to the pandemic declaration of the World Health Organization (WHO) and local health directives by stopping all face-to-face learning, including practicums. This sudden cessation was done for reasons of safety and liability. Rapid shifts were required, presenting functional, ethical, and privacy challenges for students and faculty who recognized that practicums are vital for social work students preparing to enter practice. Using a theoretical framework of compounding complexity, the paper considers eight key learnings from the authors’ experiences managing a social work practicum program, contemplating implications for current and future crisis-oriented fieldwork. This paper goes further to challenge a re-evaluation of social work as a result of the pandemic, social movements including the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as the changing socio-economic factors that influence service users’ lives. These conversations have emerged within the pandemic context and afford a moment to reflect on the place and role of social work.Alternate :Le 13 mars 2020, Mount Royal University a répondu à la declaration de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) au sujet de la pandémie et aux directives sanitaires locales en arrêtant tout apprentissage en présentiel, dont les stages de formation pratique. Cet arrêt brutal a été fait pour des raisons de sécuritié et de responsabilité. Reconnaissant que les stages sont essentiels pour les étudiant.e.s en travail social se préparant à exercer la profession, des changements rapides ont été nécessaires, présentant des défis fonctionnels, éhiques et de confidentialité pour les étudiant.e.s et les professeur.e.s. À l’aide d’un cadre théorique de complexité croissante, l’article examine huit enseignements clés tirés des experiences des auteur.e.s dans la gestion d’un programme de stage en travail social, et envisage les implications actuelles et futures pour les stages en contexte de crise. Cet article va plus loin en questionnant et demandant une redéfinition du travail social en réponse à la pandémie, les mouvement sociaux dont Black Lives Matter, ainsi que de l’évolution des facteurs socioéconomiques qui influencent la vie des usagers.ères. Ces conversations ont émergé dans le contexte de la pandémie et offrent un moment de réflexion sur la place et le rôle du travail social.

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