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1.
Biomolecules ; 12(6)2022 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883989

ABSTRACT

For the first time, the influence of COVID-19 on blood microrheology was studied. For this, the method of filtering erythrocytes through filters with pores of 3.5 µm was used. Filterability was shown to significantly decrease with the increasing severity of the patient's condition, as well as with a decrease in the ratio of hemoglobin oxygen saturation to the oxygen fraction in the inhaled air (SpO2/FiO2). The filterability of ≤ 0.65, or its fast decrease during treatment, were indicators of a poor prognosis. Filterability increased significantly with an increase in erythrocyte count, hematocrit and blood concentrations of hemoglobin, albumin, and total protein. The effect of these parameters on the erythrocyte filterability is directly opposite to their effect on blood macrorheology, where they all increase blood viscosity, worsening the erythrocyte deformability. The erythrocyte filterability decreased with increasing oxygen supply rate, especially in patients on mechanical ventilation, apparently not due to the oxygen supplied, but to the deterioration of the patients' condition. Filterability significantly correlates with the C-reactive protein, which indicates that inflammation affects the blood microrheology in the capillaries. Thus, the filterability of erythrocytes is a good tool for studying the severity of the patient's condition and his prognosis in COVID-19.

2.
Am J Emerg Med ; 57: 54-59, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1803390

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Noninvasive risk assessment is crucial in patients with COVID-19 in emergency department. Since limited data is known about the role of noninvasive parameters, we aimed to evaluate the role of a noninvasive parameter 'SpO2/FiO2' in independently predicting 30-day mortality in patients with COVID-19 and its prognostic utility in combination with a noninvasive score 'CRB-65'. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed in a tertiary training and research hospital, which included 272 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia diagnosed with polymerase chain reaction in emergency department. Data on characteristics, vital signs, and laboratory parameters were recorded from electronic medical records. The primary outcome of the study was 30-day mortality, and we assessed the discriminative ability of SpO2/FiO2 in predicting mortality in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and its prognostic utility in combination with conventional pneumonia risk assessment scores. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis revealed that only SpO2/FiO2 level was found to be an independent parameter associated with 30-day mortality (OR:0.98, 95% CI: 0.98-0.99, p = 0.003). PSI and CURB-65 were found to be better scores than CRB-65 in predicting 30-day mortality (AUC: 0.79 vs 0.72, p = 0.04; AUC: 0.76 vs 0.72, p = 0.01 respectively). Both SpO2/FiO2 combined with CRB-65 and SpO2/FiO2 combined with CURB-65 have good discriminative ability and seemed to be more favorable than PSI in predicting 30-days mortality (AUC: 0.83 vs 0.75; AUC: 0.84 vs 0.75), however no significant difference was found (p = 0.21 and p = 0.06, respectively). CONCLUSION: SpO2/FiO2 is a promising index in predicting mortality. Addition of SpO2/FiO2 to CRB-65 improved the role of CRB-65 alone, however it performed similar to PSI. The combined noninvasive model of SpO2/FiO2 and CRB-65 may help physicians quickly stratify COVID-19 patients on admission, which is expected to be particularly important in hospitals still stressed by pandemic volumes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
3.
J Crit Care ; 68: 31-37, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SpO2/FiO2 is a useful oxygenation parameter with prognostic capacity in patients with ARDS. We investigated the prognostic capacity of SpO2/FiO2 for mortality in patients with ARDS due to COVID-19. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of a national multicenter cohort study in invasively ventilated patients with ARDS due to COVID-19. The primary endpoint was 28-day mortality. RESULTS: In 869 invasively ventilated patients, 28-day mortality was 30.1%. The SpO2/FiO2 on day 1 had no prognostic value. The SpO2/FiO2 on day 2 and day 3 had prognostic capacity for death, with the best cut-offs being 179 and 199, respectively. Both SpO2/FiO2 on day 2 (OR, 0.66 [95%-CI 0.46-0.96]) and on day 3 (OR, 0.70 [95%-CI 0.51-0.96]) were associated with 28-day mortality in a model corrected for age, pH, lactate levels and kidney dysfunction (AUROC 0.78 [0.76-0.79]). The measured PaO2/FiO2 and the PaO2/FiO2 calculated from SpO2/FiO2 were strongly correlated (Spearman's r = 0.79). CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of patients with ARDS due to COVID-19, the SpO2/FiO2 on day 2 and day 3 are independently associated with and have prognostic capacity for 28-day mortality. The SpO2/FiO2 is a useful metric for risk stratification in invasively ventilated COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Oximetry , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
4.
J Anesth ; 35(6): 827-836, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early identification of critically ill coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients in clinical settings is crucial in reducing the mortality rate. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether the saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2) to fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FiO2) ratio (SF ratio) at admission is useful for the early identification of severe COVID-19. METHODS: This single-center, retrospective, observational study conducted at the University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan, included 26 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 between January 24 and May 6, 2020. COVID-19 severity was classified into two groups based on the SF ratio: ≤ 235 (moderate to severe disease: low group) and > 235 (normal to mild disease: high group). The characteristics, laboratory data, and outcomes of the patients were examined retrospectively and compared between the groups. RESULTS: Of the 26 patients [median age 51.5 years, interquartile range 35.8-67.0], 6 were in the low group (23%) and 20 in the high group (77%). The low group had a higher respiratory rate than the high group (p < 0.05). Blood tests immediately after admission showed that the low group had significantly lower albumin (p < 0.01), and higher lactate dehydrogenase (p < 0.01), C-reactive protein (p < 0.01), and D-dimer (p < 0.01) levels than the high group. Moreover, all patients received antiviral agents; four received continuous renal replacement therapy and invasive positive pressure ventilation, one received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and two died in the low group. CONCLUSION: SF ratio measurement at admission could assist clinicians in the early identification of severe COVID-19, which in turn can lead to early therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Oxygen , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Respir Med Case Rep ; 31: 101203, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733634

ABSTRACT

This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of co-infection of Bordetella bronchiseptica and SARS-CoV-2 in a young patient with underlying idiopathic bronchiectasis and vitamin D3 deficiency that was treated successfully with a combination therapeutic regime integrating doxycycline, empiric therapies for COVID-19, vitamin D supplementation, and supportive ICU care. Large prospective studies are required to investigate further the role of co-infections in COVID-19 patients with bronchiectasis. Randomized control trials should examine the putative beneficial role of vitamin D supplementation in patients with COVID-19.

6.
Respir Res ; 21(1): 194, 2020 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670959

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Oxygen saturation to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (SpO2/FiO2) has been described as potential predictor of poor outcome for COVID-19, without considering its time-varying behavior though. METHODS: Prognostic value of SpO2/FiO2 was evaluated by jointly modeling the longitudinal responses of SpO2/FiO2 and time-to-event data retrieved from 280 severe and critically ill (intensive care) patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: A sharply decrease of SpO2/FiO2 from the first to second measurement for non-survivors was observed, and a strong association between square root SpO2/FiO2 and mortality risk was demonstrated, with a unit decrease in the marker corresponding to 1.82-fold increase in mortality risk (95% CI: 1.56-2.13). CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggested that SpO2/FiO2 could serve as a non-invasive prognostic marker to facilitate early adjustment for treatment, thus improving overall survival.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness/mortality , Hospital Mortality/trends , Oxygen Consumption/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , China , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Oximetry/methods , Oxygen/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis
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