Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 51
Filter
1.
Archives of Neuropsychiatry / Noropsikiatri Arsivi ; 59(3):226-231, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2026436

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Various restrictions due to the coronavirus infection have affected working life globally. People with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) have several difficulties in social life, patient follow-up, and receiving treatments. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the experiences of pwMS during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: We developed a 50-question survey aiming to determine fears, anxieties, and the problems experienced by patients regarding their diseases and social lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire was released online via the Turkish MS Society website, local MS societies websites, and social media accounts. Only the answers of the patients who filled out the questionnaire completely were evaluated. Results: In total, 6008 patients took the survey, and 3255 of them completed the questionnaire. Among all, 378 patients (11.6%) were positive for COVID-19. The most common COVID-19-related symptom was fatigue (48.4%). The routine medical follow-up was interrupted in 61.4% and the medication was discontinued in 14% of the patients. Approximately 25% of the patients reported different symptoms related to relapse activity. The main concern of the patients related to the COVID-19 pandemic was the disruption of the health of the ones they loved. Among all the patients, 4.4% lost their jobs. Conclusion: Our data showed that the COVID-19 pandemic strongly affected the working lives of pwMS. Also, the pandemic changed the attitudes of patients and neurologists. Therefore, the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on disease approach, patient follow-up, social conditions, and working life should be monitored.

2.
Archives of Neuropsychiatry / Noropsikiatri Arsivi ; 59(3):177-182, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2026435

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The study aims to evaluate the motor, non-motor, cognitive and psychiatric conditions of our patients diagnosed with Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (IPD) before and after the COVID-19 pandemic and to investigate the effect of the pandemic on male and female genders. Methods: Ninety patients were included in the study. Demographic data such as age, gender, and duration of disease, type of disease of the patients were recorded. Patients were then divided into 2 groups: male and female. Movement disorders of both groups before the pandemic, disease stage determined by H&Y and UPDRS at the admission and after the pandemic, Levodopa equivalent dose used were recorded and all patients were surveyed to evaluate their motor, non-motor, cognitive, and psychiatric conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on male and female genders were investigated. Results: Of the patients, 40 were male and 50 were female. Daytime drowsiness, weakness, impaired walking, constipation, sleep disorders, and inability to turn in the bed worsened compared to the period before the pandemic. Yet, of the psychiatric symptoms, boredom, unhappiness, anhedonia, irritability, and tension were found to increase during the pandemic. There was a statistically significant difference in UPDRS, H&Y and disease stages before and after the COVID-19 pandemic in both groups, especially in the female group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although it was more pronounced in female patients with IPD diagnosis, both motor and non-motor symptoms were found to worsen during the COVID-19 pandemic in both groups.

3.
European Review for Medical & Pharmacological Sciences ; 26(16):5956-5962, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2026357

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the manuscript was to measure the levels of psychological stress, both acute and post-traumatic in the Saudi Arabian population during the situation resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among people of Saudi Arabia (SA) to measure levels of psychological stress, both acute and post-traumatic during the COVID-19 outbreak. Data were collected from five regions in SA using validated questionnaires including Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and Impact of Events Scale (IES) through social media channels from March 2021 to January 2022. RESULTS: The total number of participants was 1,560. Most of participants (60.2%) were females. Around 53.6% of the sample were aged between 16-24 years old. The majority of participants (87.3%) was Saudi national. About 82% of participants was from Eastern (40.1%) and Western (42.2%) regions, followed by those from Central, Northern, and Southern. More than 60% of them had a college degree or above. The mean K 10 score was 28.33 for the sample which was above the cut-off of 25, implying significant levels of acute stress in the sample. IES values showed a mean of 28.19, well above the cut-off of significant Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms (24). K-10 and IES scores revealed that about 76.7% of the participants suffered from significant acute stress and 59.1% suffered from symptoms of PTSD during the COVID-19 era. CONCLUSIONS: The nationwide study emphasizes the fact that the Saudi population was found to be extremely stressed and traumatized during the COVID-19 pandemic era and calls for effective.

4.
British Journal of Child Health ; 3(4):199-203, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025625

ABSTRACT

The last years have been characterised by disasters and tragic events, leading to an extremely negative news cycle. Stephanie Thornton discusses the impact this can have on children and young people's mental health and wellbeing.

5.
Emergency Nurse ; 30(5):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025353

ABSTRACT

I used to love my job, but recently I have had to brace myself before starting a shift, as I wonder 'how much abuse am I going to suffer today?'.

6.
Nursing Education Perspectives (Wolters Kluwer Health) ; 43(5):333-334, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2018184

ABSTRACT

Nursing students' significant physical and emotional stress levels have been a recent topic in nursing education, amplifying wellness concerns among faculty and nursing schools. A solution is to implement a wellness program. Wellness programs can benefit the future of the nursing workforce by giving students the ability to cope with stressful situations. This article describes the implementation of a wellness program in a large nursing school during the worldwide pandemic.

7.
Journal of Sport Behavior ; 45(3):91-107, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2012876

ABSTRACT

Using a five-year data set including the crowd-less games in the 2020 English, Spanish, Italian, and German first division football leagues and multivariate regression analysis, this paper estimated how fans influence home field advantage. Consistent with previous studies, the estimates showed that in games with crowds, referees gave fewer fouls, yellow cards, and red cards but more penalty kicks to the home team than to the away team. Removing the fans from the stadium eliminated these home advantages coming through referee decisions. Removing fans reduced yellow and red cards given to away teams but did not change cards given to home teams. There was not a similar asymmetry for fouls and penalty kicks. These results suggest that crowds influenced referee judgments about how severe an infraction was more than they influenced decisions about whether a foul occurred. The addition of VAR had little impact on referee decisions and no effect on the home advantage in goal differential. Despite the home bias in referee decisions when crowds were in the stadium, fouls, cards, and penalty kicks played a relatively small role in determining home advantage in game outcomes and most of the home advantage remained after fans were removed.

8.
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2001654

ABSTRACT

COVID‐19 pandemic has had a great impact worldwide, specially affecting mental health and has undoubtedly taken part in human behaviour modification, increasing global health burden and with stress, anxiety and depression being the main contributors to this load. Because of the importance of this issue, the objective of this study was the creation of an explanatory model for the causal relationship of the main psychological variables: stress, anxiety and depression in the COVID‐19 pandemic context. A cross‐sectional study was carried out with a sample of 709 volunteers, sociodemographic variables and psychological symptoms were measured through a virtual DASS‐21 questionnaire, during the COVID‐19 pandemic, dated from November 2 to 6, 2020. A structural equation model using the weighted least squares means and the adjusted variance was employed for the creation and adjustment of the explanatory relational model. The results showed the presence of stress, anxiety and depression symptoms among the general population. The model showed an adequate fit (CFI = 0.94;TLI = 0.94;RMSEA = 0.06;P = 0.000) and was able to explain more than 80% of depressive symptoms (R2 = 0.86) and more than 70% of anxiety symptoms (R2 = 0.72), in addition to showing a unidirectional causal relationship of long‐term stress on anxiety, and anxiety on depressive symptoms, showing a linked behaviour of the same, in the adjusted model. It was also outlined that this model was characterized by being expressed mainly in women, with lower quality of sleep and at a younger age. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Mental Health Nursing is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
Journal of Practice in Clinical Psychology ; 9(4):329-338, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1924971

ABSTRACT

Objective: The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and cessation of full face-to-face affiliation along with homebound restrictions have caused a variety of psychological distress among adolescents. Adolescents vary in the way they perceive such stressors and some respond with eating disturbances, which could reflect their dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. The present research aimed at elucidating potential mediating pathways from perceived stress and psychological distress to emotional eating. Methods: This cross-sectional study was composed of 292 adolescents who were assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale, COVID-19-Related Psychological Stress Scale, Emotional Eating subscale of the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. Correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationship between variables. ANOVA was conducted to detect differences between males and females for emotional eating. Then, a mediation analysis was conducted to assess whether emotional dysregulation was a mediator between psychological distress and emotional eating. Results: Results of path analyses indicated that a model with perceived stress and psychological distress predicting emotion eating through the mediation of emotion dysregulation was the best fit for the data (CFI=0.970, GFI=0.949, df=26, chi2=53.69, chi2/df=2.06, P>0.05, and RMSEA=0.069). Mediation analyses showed the mediating role of emotion dysregulation in the link between perceived stress and emotional eating (Sobel's z=2.83, P<0.05) while, it could not function as a mediator between psychological distress and emotional eating (Sobel's z=0.90, P>0.05). Conclusion: This study contributes to our understanding of the role of emotion regulation in the relationship between perceived stress and psychological distress and emotional eating in adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The implication of this study is for therapeutic intervention to target emotional dysregulation of adolescents confronted with COVID-19 stressors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior ; 54(7):S34-S34, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1921153

ABSTRACT

Early care and education (ECE) workers experience physical and mental barriers to health. The novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) worsened ECE workers' physical health, emotional stress, and financial burdens. These measures of well-being are important as they have also been linked to ECE workers' relationship with children in their classrooms. Examine the impact of COVID-19 on the well-being of North Carolina (NC) Head Start (HS) teachers with an emphasis on their personal/professional relationships, personal health behaviors, and stressors. A cross sectional convenience sample of NC HS teachers were recruited to participate in the study. Data were collected from teachers across all three regions of North Carolina September 2020-March 2021 using an online 27-item survey. Researchers analyzed demographic information and quantitative survey data using basic descriptive statistics. Two researchers coded participants' open-ended responses using basic thematic analysis. Survey respondents (n = 88) were predominantly female (97.6%), Black/African American (46.6%) or White (43.2%), with an average age of 43 years old. Teachers reported increased challenges to maintaining relationships with coworkers (57.9%), children in their classrooms (84.4%), and the children's families (81.1%). Half (50.6%) reported COVID-19 impacted their health. Over 70% indicated COVID-19 made physical activity challenging, 61.5% experienced weight gain, and 59% increased their snacking. Teachers expressed an increase in six psychological distress indicators;nervousness (88.9%), hopelessness (54.3%), restlessness (72.4%), sadness (50.6%), everything is an effort (58.4%) and worthlessness (31.2%). Survey results furthered the understanding of COVID-19's effects on HS teacher health. In a workforce overburdened with stress, COVID-19 compounded and created barriers to wellness. Future research should explore avenues to reduce health barriers for all ECE workers during the ongoing pandemic. NIH

11.
Minerva Psychiatry ; 63(2):111-120, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1918287

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has affected the healthcare workers (HCWs) worldwide. We plan to assess the psychological impact of this pandemic in different groups of HCWs including female community health volunteers (FCHVs) at various types of health facilities in Nepal, factors associated with it and the degree of satisfaction with the ongoing mental health support system. METHODS: A cross-sectional web-based survey with an option of telephone interview was conducted from June 20 to July 7, 2020. The questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics, work related characteristics, substance use history, and degree of satisfaction with family, society and institutional support. Depression, anxiety, and stress scales (DASS-21) and the impact of events scale-revised (IES-R) tool were used to access the level of psychological impact. Linear regression was used to analyze factors associated with psychological outcome. RESULTS: Out of 608 respondents, the overall prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was 20.89%. 24.18%, 13.82%, and 15.46% respectively. Nurses had higher depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD scores while FCHVs had high depression and PTSD compared to doctors. For various types of health facilities, HCWs working in provincial-level hospitals had high-stress level. Similarly, "have to go into quarantine" and increased level of substance abuse were directly associated with poor psychological impact. Finally, 62% of HCWs did not have any institutional mental health support system. Among those who had institutional mental health support, 39.4% were not satisfied. CONCLUSIONS: We found mild to extremely severe level of depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD among HCWs in Nepal. Urgent plans are required to mitigate the mental health risk caused by this current pandemic.

12.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther ; 45(2): 127-136, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1907332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess self-reported data from a sample of U.S. doctors of chiropractic during the COVID-19 pandemic about levels of psychological stress and beliefs of the association between chiropractic spinal manipulation and the immune system. METHODS: Chiropractors in the United States were invited via social media and e-mail to complete a survey about chiropractic and COVID-19. The survey collected demographic information, office protocols, changes made during the COVID-19 pandemic, chiropractic profession opinions, information related to stress, and personal beliefs from April 19 to May 3 of 2020. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of approximately 77000 U.S.-licensed chiropractors,750 responded. Of this sample, 51.2% reported moderate and 30.4% reported severe levels of psychological stress. The primary stressors were financial and business concerns. There was a mixed response regarding beliefs if there was evidence to support a connection between spinal manipulation and the immune system. A majority (76.1%) responded that there should be no advertising for immune-boosting effects of spinal manipulation during the pandemic. A minority (18.3%) reported adding use of telehealth to deliver their services. CONCLUSION: A majority of chiropractors included in this survey reported that the COVID-19 pandemic caused them psychological stress. More than half of the respondents reported moderate stress, with the second highest number of respondents reporting severe stress. Subgroup differences were noted in stress levels and causes, as well as pandemic-related practice changes. A dichotomy was noted between beliefs and recommended actions about effects on the immune system, which may represent that providers are aware of current evidence and considering association recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chiropractic , Manipulation, Chiropractic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
13.
Missouri medicine ; 118(1):7-12, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1888201

ABSTRACT

Medical students, residents, and practicing physicians experience high burnout, depression, and suicide rates, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated stress for many.1-6 While laudable, current well-being efforts appear insufficient to meet the challenges that so many are facing. This essay explores approaches that individuals and organizations can take to promote mental health and well-being from medical school to practice. Copyright 2021 by the Missouri State Medical Association.

14.
PLoS ONE Vol 16(8), 2021, ArtID e0255683 ; 16(8), 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837081

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly altered the routine of life and caused unanticipated changes resulting in severe psychological responses and mental health crisis. The study aimed to identify psycho-social factors that predicted distress among Indian population during the spread of novel Coronavirus. Method: An online survey was conducted to assess the predictors of distress. A global logistic regression model was built, by identifying significant factors from individual logistic regression models built on various groups of independent variables. The prediction capability of the model was compared with the random forest classifier. Results: The respondents (N = 1060) who are more likely to be distressed, are in the age group of 21-35 years, are females (OR = 1.425), those working on site (OR = 1.592), have pre-existing medical conditions (OR = 1.682), do not have health insurance policy covering COVID-19 (OR = 1.884), have perceived seriousness of COVID-19 (OR = 1.239), have lack of trust in government (OR = 1.246) and whose basic needs' fulfillment are unsatisfactory (OR = 1.592). The ones who are less likely to be distressed, have higher social support and psychological capital. Random forest classifier correctly classified 2.3% and 17.1% of people under lower and higher distress respectively, with respect to logistic regression. Conclusions: This study confirms the prevalence of high distress experienced by Indians at the time of COVID-19 and provides pragmatic implications for psychological health at macro and micro levels during an epidemiological crisis. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Medicus ; 62(3):2-3, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1823898
17.
Enferm Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 33(2): 77-88, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819483

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented health crisis. Pressure on the National Health System has created unique demand particularly in certain services and care units like the critical care units. OBJECTIVE: To learn about the experience of nurses in caring for people with coronavirus in critical care units. METHOD: A qualitative phenomenological study that constitutes the second phase of a mixed methodology project. We conducted interviews with 17 nurses caring for patients affected by COVID-19 in critical care units. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic discourse analysis. RESULTS: This article shows the findings around the theme "the value of human resources" which is nuanced through sub-themes "it's not the beds, it's the expert staff", "shouldering the patient's burden", and suffering because "they have not cared well". DISCUSSION: Expert nurses have emerged as leading professionals in the care of the critical patient during the COVID-19 pandemic. This leadership is executed from a profile framed in an inclusive philosophy where wisdom, agility and intuition are the key elements underpinning problem identification and solving in a creative way, while adapting to the needs of the patient and healthcare team as they emerge. CONCLUSIONS: Expert nurses have played an advanced role in the management of care and human resources by exercising effective leadership in the clinical setting. Care has been hampered due to the crisis, which causes nurses moral distress because they have been unable to meet standards of quality and excellence in care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics
18.
Nursing Made Incredibly Easy! ; 20(3):34-37, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1806595

ABSTRACT

Practicing self-care during the COVID-19 pandemic is crucial for nursing students to balance their academic lives and for their future success in the nursing profession.

20.
Journal of Korean Gerontological Nursing ; 24(1):55-64, 2022.
Article in Korean | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1743051

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations among perceived health status, stress, daily life changes, physical distancing, depression, and to determine associated fctors of depression fo older adults in COVID-19. Methods: This study was conducted on 42,448 persons aged 65 years and above who participated in the 2020 Community Health Survey Data analysis was done with SAS 9.4. Results: The factors related to depression of community-dwelling older adults were gender (β=.04, p<.001), age (β=.07, p<.001), education (β=-.04, p<.001), monthly household income (β=-.02, p<.001), depressive symptoms (β=.27, p<.001), unmet healthcare needs (β=-.08, p<.001), households (β=.02, p<.001), perceived health status (β=.21, p<.001), stress (β=-.26, p<.001), daily life changes (β=-.03, p<.001), and physical distancing (β=-.02, p<.001). The descriptive power of this regression model was 31%. Conclusion: Treatment and education for diseases and depression should be provided to community-dwelling older adults to prevent and manage their depression. In particular, nursing interventions are needed to improve depression in the older adults. Health care programs such as reducing stress and maintaining daily activities while maintaining good health should also be provided. © 2022 Korean Gerontological Nursing Society.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL