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1.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(1-B):No Pagination Specified, 84.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2102067

ABSTRACT

Background: Many high school students struggle with mental illness, especially since the isolation of the COVID-19 pandemic. Educating high school faculty/staff with basic information to recognize and refer students for mental health concerns may improve faculty/staff knowledge, confidence, and trust in the mental health referral process, which may then increase referrals and subsequent treatment of at-risk youth. Methods: A Quality Improvement Project was conducted by a Hawaiece[yen]i Keiki Nurse Practitioner at a Hawaiece[yen]i public high school to determine if educating high school faculty and staff on identification and referral of high school students displaying signs of mental health distress improves staff knowledge, confidence, and trust in the overall process. The project was conducted by delivering an asynchronous webinar intervention to the faculty and staff. Data was collected via a pre-test, post-test, and a one-month follow-up test by means of a questionnaire. Results: Of the 47 total participants, 37 completed the post-survey, and 25 completed the one-month follow-up survey. Results from the one-month follow-up indicate participant level of confidence (measured on a 5-point Likert scale) in identification of students improved from mean score m = 2.96 (pre-test) to m = 4.12 (1-month follow-up), level of confidence in knowledge of the process improved from m = 2.65 (pre-test) to m = 4.11 (1-month follow-up), and level of trust in the process improved from m = 2.21 (pre-test) to m = 3.20 (1-month follow-up). Conclusion: The intervention was successful in increasing faculty/staff level of confidence in identification of students who may need mental health referrals, level of confidence in the process for referral, and level of trust in the referral process. Participants' scores between the immediate post-test and the one-month follow-up remained relatively consistent over time, indicating effective retention of the material. Recommended future research includes studying the number of referrals made after the intervention, and studying actual outcomes of those referrals among students in order to determine if the intervention improves student mental health outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1562-1576, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101488

ABSTRACT

Research suggests that online learning should be more engaging and collaborative to provide a compatible alternative to in-person learning. Many educators have implemented active learning in their in-person classrooms, while only a few assess how effective similar techniques are in virtual environments. The authors hypothesize that virtual learning, including active learning components, can improve student learning in virtual environments. Furthermore, the authors hypothesize that learning in virtual settings would be affected by students' gender, ability, and familiarity with the topic. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental study involving eighty-seven students from two institutions who participated in an online workshop covering fundamental concepts in construction scheduling. They were split into two groups: one group had no prominent active learning component, while the other was exposed to an active learning component. All participants completed pre and post-workshop surveys to assess their learning of the workshop outcomes and explore the effectiveness of virtual workshops and active learning components in online course delivery. The results of this study suggest that virtual workshops are effective in teaching construction scheduling, while active learning in the form of virtual pair-work does not have a significant positive impact on student learning. Furthermore, student performance in virtual workshops significantly differs based on gender, ability, and familiarity with the topic. Therefore, instructors need to be aware of significant student performance challenges, particularly for males and those with some familiarity with the topics covered in virtual workshops. Since this study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, the authors present further challenges and recommendations for educators and institutions under similar emergency circumstances.

3.
Acta Odontol Latinoam ; 35(2): 134-143, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101107

ABSTRACT

The SARS-Cov-2 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the educational structure of dentistry courses and highlighted the importance of online tools. Understanding students' perception regarding these changes is essential to establishing future teaching-learning strategies to accommodate students' needs in higher education. The aim of this study was to assess students' perceptions of the Oral Radiology teachinglearning process before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The sample consisted of students (n = 111) of the 2nd, 4th and 6th semesters of the dentistry course, who answered a questionnaire with 21 items: A) Students' demographic data (5 questions); B) Students' teaching-learning experiences during the pre-pandemic period (8 questions); and C) Students' teaching-learning experiences during the post-pandemic period (8 questions). Stuart-Maxwell tests revealed statistically significant differences between students' opinions before and during the pandemic when they were asked about the structure of the Oral Radiology module (p = 0.008); their previous experience with e-learning and teaching (p < 0.001); their thoughts about the importance of e-learning in Oral Radiology (p < 0.05); and the time they spent online for academic purposes (p < 0.05). Students seem to prefer on-campus activities (before COVID-19), but the pandemic increased their awareness of the importance of e-learning, the time they spent on online studies, and their knowledge of online educational tools.


A pandemia de SARS-Cov-2 (COVID-19) mudou a estrutura educacional dos cursos de odontologia e destacou a importância das ferramentas online. Compreender a percepção dos alunos sobre as mudanças vivenciadas é essencial para estabelecer futuras estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem e acomodar as necessidades dos alunos no ensino superior. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a percepção dos alunos sobre o processo de ensino-aprendizagem de Radiologia Odontológica antes e durante a pandemia de COVID-19. A amostra foi composta por alunos (n = 111) do 2º, 4º e 6º semestres do curso de odontologia que responderam a um questionário com 21 itens: A) Dados demográficos dos alunos (5 questões); B) Experiências de ensino-aprendizagem dos alunos no período pré-pandemia (8 questões); e C) Experiências de ensino-aprendizagem dos alunos no período pós-pandemia (8 questões). Os testes de Stuart-Maxwell revelaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre as opiniões dos alunos antes e durante as pandemias quando questionados sobre a estrutura do módulo de Radiologia Odontológica (p = 0,008); sua experiência anterior com ensino a distância (p < 0,001); seus pensamentos relacionados à importância da Radiologia Odontológica via e-learning (p < 0,05); e o tempo gasto online para fins acadêmicos (p < 0,05). Os alunos parecem preferir atividades no campus (antes do COVID-19), mas as pandemias aumentaram sua conscientização sobre a importância do e-learning, seu tempo dedicado aos estudos online e sua familiarização com ferramentas educacionais online.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
4.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(8): 1564-1571, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101070

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To find the moderating role of social support and creative coping, and the mediating role of cyberchondria in relationship between fear of coronavirus disease-2019 and stress in university students. METHODS: The correlational study was conducted at the Lahore Garrison University, Lahore, Pakistan, between May and September 2020, and comprised students regardless of gender and age from different public and private universities across Pakistan. Data was collected online using Fear of Coronavirus Disease-2019 Scale, Cyberchondria Severity Scale, Creative Coping Strategies Scale, Social Support Survey, Perceived Stress Scale and Perception of Academic Stress Scale. Data was analysed using SPSS 22. RESULTS: Of the 205 subjects, 83(40.5%) were males and 122(59.5%) were females. The overall mean age was 21.22±1.84 years. Fear of coronavirus disease-2019 had significant positive relationship with cyberchondria, and cyberchondria had significant positive relationship with creative coping and academic stress (p<0.05). Social support had significant negative relationship with general stress (p<0.05). There was significant interaction among fear of coronavirus disease-2019, creative coping, social support and cyberchondria in predicting general stress (p<0.05). Fear of coronavirus disease-2019 alone did not predict stress (p>0.05), but it significantly predicted cyberchondria which, in turn, predicted stress (p<0.05). Creative coping and social support significantly moderated the relationship involving fear of coronavirus disease-2019, cyberchondria and general stress (p<0.05). The female subjects utilised more creative coping strategies, received more social support, and had higher levels of general stress compared to the males (p<0.05), while the male subjects had more mistrust on medical professionals (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings are important for students, parents and teachers to understand the role of social support to reduce the fear of coronavirus disease-2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Universities , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adaptation, Psychological , Fear , Social Support , Students
5.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(10): 1647-1653, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100048

ABSTRACT

Background: Most educational institutions in Nigeria were shut down for a long while at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic as a preventive measure, and this affected dental students' academic and clinical training. Aim: To determine the influence of the pandemic on the academic, clinical training, and psychosocial well-being of dental students in Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate dental students in clinical years in Nigerian dental schools. Participants received the questionnaire through an online platform, it had four sections; socio-demographics, impact on academic training, psychosocial well-being, and an open-ended segment for participants' suggestions to challenges. A mixed method was utilized to analyze the data. The statistical significance level was P < 0.05. Results: One hundred two dental students from nine dental schools participated, with a mean age of 25.3 ± 2.4 years. There were 56 (54.9%) males. Most students, 80 (78.4%) reported that their stay-at-home had not been rewarding academically. The majority, 90 (88.2%) were worried about contracting COVID-19 on school resumption. Participants' psychosocial well-being had significant associations with gender (P = 0.001) and self-directed learning during their stay-at-home (P = 0.001). More female students, 33 (71.7%) were severely worried compared to males 20 (35.7%). Their major suggestions were to commence online teaching and examinations (40.1%) and be provided with adequate personal protective equipment (18.6%). Conclusion: Most undergraduate students in Nigeria were anxious about COVID-19, and females were more affected. This negatively impacted their academic and clinical training. This underscores the importance of adequate psychological support for undergraduate dental students by school authorities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Nigeria/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students, Dental/psychology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies
6.
Frontiers in Education ; JOUR, 7.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2099121

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the escalation of the Black Lives Matter Movement worldwide have foregrounded the long-standing inequality in society and healthcare. The provision of culturally competent care has become more necessary than at any other time. However, cultural competence (CC) education remains inconsistent across medical schools, and little is known about how students develop their CC through campus-based classroom teaching. We took an ethnographic approach to study students' development of CC in campus-based formal classroom teaching. This study was conducted in a large London medical school in England. We triangulated data collected from 6-month participant observation, 25 individual interviews, and three focus groups to generate reliable accounts of students' CC developmental experience. Thick descriptions were developed through iterative, inductive, interactive, and reflexive review and interpretation of data using NVivo 11. The results show that students undergo staged cultural learning throughout their undergraduate medical curriculum through bespoke CC lectures, workshops, clinical/research projects, and integrated clinical simulations that incorporate CC and other clinical subjects. The early learning mainly takes place in the pre-clinical year of the curriculum, among which a range of valued-based sessions is observed as conducive to students' development of CC. As they progress, students develop their CC by attending clinical sessions with embedded cultural content. The curriculum in senior years presents reduced mandatory teaching, but more clinical exposure and opportunities to reach out to other subjects and disciplines. It means students start to have more diverse and dispersed learning experiences based on their individual choices, some of which may contribute to their development of CC. This study provides a rare insight into medical students' CC development through participation in campus-based classroom teaching. Various learning opportunities contribute to different aspects of CC development and cater to different learning preferences of the diverse student population. To support students' comprehensive development of CC, educators need to work collaboratively and use overt signposting to related disciplines and subjects. There needs to be recognition of students' learning not only in the formal curriculum but also in the informal and hidden curricula.

7.
Journal of Chemical Education ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2096616

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced the transfer of face-to-face instruction to an online mode. The current study sought to describe the delivery of online biochemistry laboratories to undergraduate students. The paper also attempted to assess its advantages and disadvantages at the faculty of dental medicine of Monastir (FDMM), Tunisia. Four online biochemistry laboratory sessions were offered to FDMM year 2 students. To ensure the installation of forums, videos, handouts, workshops, and test-taking, the Moodle platform was employed;however, to conduct synchronous meetings, Microsoft Office Teams was used. More than 95% of students actively participated in e-resources consultation, pretest, and exam taking. However, the student percentage in workshops decreased from phase 1 to phase 2. Just 52% of students attended the forums. The overall overview percentage, students who attended "equal to or more than 80% of the entire activities", was 27%. Students performed better scores in the first and second exams than in the third and fourth ones. Forums, workshops, and videos were the most important teaching tools that led to the success of the online laboratory. These methods improved conceptual knowledge and scientific process abilities. The current study contributes to the previous literature by investigating the major factors impacting successful e-learning adoption.

8.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2095549

ABSTRACT

Purpose To assess the sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with driving after marijuana use among US college students. Methods A secondary analysis used the Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 American College Health Association- National College Health Assessment III and the dataset was restricted to college students ≥ 18 years of age who reported recent driving and marijuana use. Associations between risk factors and driving after marijuana use were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results A total of 29.9% (n=4,947) of the respondents reported driving after marijuana use. Males (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.48-1.82), non-Hispanic Black (AOR: 1.32, 95% CI:1.02-1.71), sexual minorities (AOR:1.19, 95% CI: 1.07-1.31), individuals with an alcohol or substance use disorder (AOR: 1.44, 95% CI:1.08-1.91), anxiety (AOR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.06-1.36), higher suicidality (AOR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.07-1.31), and those who also drank and drove (AOR: 3.18, 95% CI: 2.84-3.57) had a higher risk of driving after marijuana use. Conclusions Future research should focus on increasing awareness of driving after marijuana use and prevention programs and/or strategies on college campuses regarding driving after marijuana use for these groups to reduce this risky behavior.

9.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-10, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097111

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Higher Education Institutions had to suspend their on-site activities and adapt to the new scenario. Therefore, the objective of the research was to investigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of the academic community of a Brazilian public university. This is a cross-sectional study, at a Brazilian public university, that used the baseline data from a longitudinal study carried out with employees and students. Participants answered a self-administered and confidential questionnaire in online platform, composed of sociodemographic, economic, lifestyles and mental health issues. 1,353 students and 372 employees participated. The prevalence of anxiety disorder symptoms among students and employees was 46.12% and 17.47%, depression 54.62% and 22.85% and stress 47.45% and 22.58%, respectively. The co-occurrence of symptoms was 33.56% among university students and 10.75% among employees. Falling family income, having stopped smoking and negative self-rated health, during the COVID-19 pandemic, may be the reasons for the high prevalence of co-occurrence of anxiety, depression and stress disorders among the academic community.

10.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-9, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097108

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, undergraduate medical students (UMS) exposed to isolation, social distancing and complete or partial face-to-face educational activities interruption may present increased stress, depression and anxiety. This study was undertaken to evaluate if, during isolation, UMS involved in online group activities as investigators of a research project (volunteer group) would present better mental health than their colleagues, not involved in that research (control group). A Web-based survey, via the Google Forms platform, including details on demographic data, life habits, previous health conditions, worries with the COVID-19 pandemic, sleep pattern modifications and depression, anxiety and mental stress, using the DASS-21 (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale) was implemented from 20 July to 31 August 2020. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS version 20.0. A p-value <0.05 was significant. A total of 684 UMS were included, 228 as a volunteer group and 456 as a control group. Mean age was 23.15 (3.16) years. The groups were paired for age, gender, ethnicity, life habits and previous health conditions. Older age, male gender, participation in the research project, unchanged sleep pattern during the pandemic, lack of fear from getting the COVID-19 and lack of previous health conditions were associated with lower DASS21 scores (better mental health). Participating as investigators of a research project foreseeing frequent interaction with patients, colleagues and professors (other investigators) lead to better mental health during the COVID-19 quarantine in Brazil.

11.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-9, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097041

ABSTRACT

Objective: We examined students' perceptions and opinions regarding others' COVID-19 mitigation behaviors and how these behaviors impacted feelings of safety and desire for on-campus engagement. Participants: Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at a midsize regional state university during the Spring 2021 semester (n = 893). Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was utilized with an online and anonymous questionnaire. Scale means were calculated followed by ANOVAs to determine significance. Results: Two independent variables impacted students' feelings of safety for on-ground courses and activities: living situation (on campus, with roommates) and school year (freshman/sophomores). Underclassmen were more likely to desire in-person campus engagement. Conclusions: Students showed a willingness to return to campus, but also concern over peer behaviors and remaining safe. Returning to a pre-pandemic social environment is critical for students' mental health, and making students feel safe on campus is an important first step to return campuses to vibrant educational and social communities.

12.
Teach Learn Nurs ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096060

ABSTRACT

Background: As part of program evaluation, the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium, a consortium of eleven state-funded nursing schools, asks that students complete end-of-term surveys. In Spring 2020, a question was added to the survey to elicit challenges experienced by students during the COVID-19 pandemic: "What was the biggest challenge that you had in completing the semester/term?" This question again was asked of students in Spring 2021. Objectives: To determine challenges faced by nursing students in 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic. Design: Qualitative. Settings: Eleven state-funded nursing schools belonging to the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium. Participants: Students enrolled in member nursing programs. Methods: Braun and Clarke's 2006 thematic analysis. Results: Eight themes were identified for each of the two years. Conclusions: Nursing faculty must anticipate and respond to student feedback while maintaining proficiency in face-to-face and online teaching-learning strategies. Waiting until emergencies arise that require different types of pedagogy is not sufficient to ensure instructor proficiency with online pedagogies.

13.
International Journal of Computer Science and Network Security ; JOUR(9):7-14, 22.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2091376

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused a global disturbance, increased anxiety, and panic, eliciting diverse reactions. While its cure has not been discovered, new infection cases and fatalities are being recorded daily. The focus of the present study was to analyze the reaction of gifted undergraduate students on social media during the quarantine period of the COVID-19. A special group of gifted students, who joined the program of attracting and nurturing talents at the University of Jeddah, University students as were the target sample of this study. To analyze online reactions during the pandemic;the choice of university students was arrived at as they are perceived to be gifted academically. Hence, the analysis of the impacts on their behavior on social media use is imperative. This study presented accurate and consistent data on the effects of social media using Twitter platforms on gifted students during the quarantine occasioned by the COVID-19 pandemic. The behavior of learners due to during the use of social media was extensively explored and results analyzed. The study was carried out between April and May 2020 (quarantine period in Saudi Arabia) to establish whether the online behavior of gifted students reflects positive or negative feelings. The methods used in conducting this study the research were online interviews and scraping participants' Twitter accounts (where most of the online activities and studies take place). The study employed the Activity theory to analyze the behavior of gifted students on social media. The sample size used was 60 students, and the analysis of their behavior was based on Activity theory Overall, the results showed proactive, positive behavior for coping with a challenging situation, educating society, and entertaining. Finally, this study recommends investing in gifted students due to their valuable problem-solving skills that can help handle global pandemics efficiently.

14.
Health SA ; 27: 1950, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090516

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccine hesitancy has seen an uprising over the decades, even though there have been many advances regarding vaccine-preventable diseases. Of late, vaccine hesitancy has resurged towards the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has major effects on the human body and has led to the development of different vaccines, which have been shown to provide immunity against the novel coronavirus. Dentists are at an increased risk to COVID-19 because of the nature of their work. It is imperative to have high vaccination coverage for this group. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine vaccine hesitancy and drivers associated with vaccine hesitancy among dental students at a university in South Africa. Setting: A dental school in South Africa was chosen as the setting for this study. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted by means of an anonymous, online, validated questionnaire to determine vaccine hesitancy. Results: Of the 205 dental students participated, 83.9% (n = 172) students were vaccine not hesitant. The main concerns regarding the vaccines were identified as safety and efficacy of the vaccine. Pressure by family or friends and the university to get vaccinated was evident. Conclusions: Vaccine hesitancy is high despite mandatory vaccination policies in South Africa. Specific drivers contributing to vaccine hesitancy were identified as doubt in the efficacy and safety of the vaccine. Contribution: This study has highlighted the prevalence of vaccine hesitancy among dental students at University of the Western Cape, prior to compulsory vacccination implementations.

15.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(10): e39157, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089637

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus continues to spread worldwide, causing various health and economic disruptions. One of the most important approaches to controlling the spread of this disease is to use an artificial intelligence (AI)-based technological intervention, such as a chatbot system. Chatbots can aid in the fight against the spread of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: This paper introduces COVID-Bot, an intelligent interactive system that can help screen students and confirm their COVID-19 vaccination status. METHODS: The design and development of COVID-Bot followed the principles of the design science research (DSR) process, which is a research method for creating a new scientific artifact. COVID-Bot was developed and implemented using the SnatchBot chatbot application programming interface (API) and its predefined tools, which are driven by various natural language processing algorithms. RESULTS: An evaluation was carried out through a survey that involved 106 university students in determining the functionality, compatibility, reliability, and usability of COVID-Bot. The findings indicated that 92 (86.8%) of the participants agreed that the chatbot functions well, 85 (80.2%) agreed that it fits well with their mobile devices and their lifestyle, 86 (81.1%) agreed that it has the potential to produce accurate and consistent responses, and 85 (80.2%) agreed that it is easy to use. The average obtained α was .87, indicating satisfactory reliability. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that incorporating chatbot technology into the educational system can combat the spread of COVID-19 among university students. The intelligent system does this by interacting with students to determine their vaccination status.

16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 740, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first wave of the pandemic when clinical placements were suspended, a UK medical student volunteering programme was developed to support local GP practices. This study aimed to explore the impact that volunteering in primary care had on students' learning and professional development to inform the design of future service-learning curricula innovations. METHODS: Seventy medical students across all years volunteered across forty-five GP practices in north-west London. Ten volunteer students and six GPs who had hosted students volunteered to participate in remotely conducted, semi-structured interviews with a researcher. Transcriptions were independently coded by two researchers and analysed by thematic analysis using service learning and communities of practice as sensitising concepts. RESULTS: Analysis showed a strong alignment between the views of students and GPs in terms of perceived learning. Our analysis of both sets of interviews resulted in five themes describing student outcomes from the volunteering scheme: developing as a doctor, understanding the complexity of medicine, responsibility driven learning, a meaningful role in a community of practice, and seeing behind the scenes in primary care. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Results from this study highlighted how a meaningful service-led role and responsibility in primary care can empower and motivate students to learn beyond the traditional medical curriculum and assessments. Adopting these new 'pro-active' roles within general practices led volunteers, particularly those in the early years of study, to develop a better understanding of primary care and medical complexity. It also enhanced their professional skills, attitudes and behaviours, while having a beneficial impact on patient care during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Volunteers , Primary Health Care
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 735, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 crisis had a significant impact on health care and nursing education as a large part of it is carried out in clinical practice. However, it is not known how the learning situations during the pandemic affected students' learning. To deepen the understanding of students' learning, learning theories within a constructive paradigm is used as a framework for this study. The purpose of the study was to explore nursing students´ perceptions of their learning in clinical practice during COVID-19. METHODS: In this interpretative qualitative study, seven focus group discussions were conducted with 21 nursing students at different stages of the nursing programme, all of whom performed clinical practice during the outbreak of COVID-19. The analysis of the discussions was performed with interpretative content analysis related to theoretical assumptions about learning. RESULTS: The learning situation was characterised by chaos and confusion affecting both the students' opportunities to learn and what they learned. Despite the uncertainty the students appreciated having experienced this unique situation, which contributed to valuable learning. Things otherwise taken for granted or not encountered before became visible. The learning processes were characterised by complexity and challenges that hindered or stimulated learning. It depended on the student's approach and the management of the clinical education. Concerns about one´s own and relatives' health, and not being able to finish studies, also affected learning. The students learned about important measures during a pandemic regarding hygiene, care organisation, communication, and the multifaceted role of the nurse. CONCLUSION: Unpredictable situations such as a pandemic can lead to unique learning since "the extraordinary makes the ordinary visible". The students learned things additional to the formal learning outcomes, and the experiences strengthened their will to become nurses. Challenges due to a crisis can become important driving forces for learning, if not experienced as overwhelming. Some students felt they received space for own initiatives and responsibility while others felt lost and abandoned. Preparing for a crisis means preparing for an unknown future. Students therefore need to experience dilemmas and uncertain situations and reflect in a safe environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Humans , Learning , Qualitative Research
18.
J Adv Nurs ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088240

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore pre-nursing students' experiences and identify factors influencing their well-being as learners during COVID-19. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used. METHODS: Short answer study data (n = 289) were collected in Fall 2020 as part of a larger IRB-approved survey-based study focused on pre-nursing students. Participants were presented with three short answer questions designed to elicit a description of their experiences as a pre-nursing student. NVivo and reflexive thematic analysis were used to analyse participant responses. RESULTS: Six themes related to learner well-being emerged from the data. Learner well-being was supported by achieving academic goals, experiencing positive feelings about current course content, creating connections with peers and envisioning themselves as nurses in the future. Negative contributors to pre-nursing student well-being included managing fears of program rejection and juggling multiple roles and demands. Online learning necessitated by COVID-19 created opportunities for loneliness and isolation from peers, technological difficulties and additional psychological stress, which also contributed negatively to learner well-being. CONCLUSION: These findings illustrate pre-nursing students' experiences and provide support for the influence of the learning environment and factors within the individual on the well-being of learners. IMPACT: Students preparing to apply to nursing programs are an understudied population and little is known about their well-being as learners. Survey-based open-ended short answer questions can be utilized to gain rich insight into their experiences. The study themes and sub-themes can be utilized for discussion and reflection in courses with pre-nursing students and as a starting point for additional conversations between pre-nursing students and educators regarding improving the support of well-being in learners. Additional research and evidence-based interventions that promote learner well-being in pre-nursing students are needed as they prepare for nursing program admission and to support their academic progression. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Members of the public were not involved in the design or conduct of the study, analysis, or interpretation of the data, or in the preparation of the manuscript because the study focus is on gaining an understanding the experiences of pre-nursing students and their well-being.

19.
Int J Dent Hyg ; 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088218

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare workers involved in procedures that generate aerosol or handling patient specimens are associated with a high possibility of COVID-19 infection. Thus, it is very important for the health workers to understand the knowledge related to transmission, prevention and protocols of COVID-19. METHODS: Cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted on dental hygiene students in Saudi Arabia. An online version of pre-tested and validated questionnaire was used to test the KAP for COVID 19. RESULTS: The mean score for knowledge-related questions was found to be 2.91 ± 1.59, attitude-related questions to be 2.84 ± 1.41 and for practice-related questions to be 4.20 ± 1.36. After converting the scores into percentages, any score <60% was categorized as poor score, 60%-80% as average score and >80% as good score. Students showed poor knowledge and attitude towards COVID-19. But the practice of dental hygiene students towards COVID-19 was found to be good with the score of 83.4%. CONCLUSION: The outcome of this cross-sectional study shows that most of dental hygiene students studying in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are following good practices towards COVID-19 inspite of having poor knowledge and attitude.

20.
Journal of Affective Disorders ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2086349

ABSTRACT

Background This meta-analysis and systematic review aimed to evaluate the global prevalence and risk factors of mental problems (i.e., depression, anxiety, stress, sleep disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), burnout, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation) among medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, psycARTICLES, PsycINFO, CNKI, and Wan Fang for studies on the prevalence of mental problems among medical students from January 1, 2020, to April 1, 2022. The pooled prevalence was calculated by random-effect models. We performed a narrative review to identify the risk factors. Results The meta-analysis included 201 studies (N = 198,000). The prevalence of depression (41 %, 95 % CI, 37–45 %,), anxiety (38 %,95 % CI, 34 %–42 %), stress (34 %, 95 % CI, 27 %–42 %), sleep disorder (52 %, 95 % CI, 44 %–60 %), psychological distress (58 %, 95 % CI, 51 %–65 %), PTSD (34 %, 95 % CI, 22 %–46 %), suicidal ideation (15 %, 95 % CI, 11 %–18 %) and burnout (38 %, 95 % CI, 25 %–50 %) was high. The major risk factors were being female, being junior or preclinical students, exposure to COVID-19, academic stress, psychiatric or physical disorders history, economic trouble, fear of education impairment, online learning trouble, fear of infection, loneliness, low physical activity, low social support, problematic internet or smartphone use, and young age. Limitations Most studies were cross-sectional. Few studies provided a reasonable response rate, suggesting potential selection bias. Conclusions The study demonstrated a high prevalence and risk factors for mental problems during COVID-19, calling for mental health services. Our findings are valuable for college and health authorities to identify high-risk students and provide targeted intervention.

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