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1.
Journal of Computer Assisted Learning ; 39(3):970-983, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-20236807

ABSTRACT

Background: Although research on mathematics learning programs has taken off in recent years, little is known about how different person characteristics are related to practice behaviour with such programs. When implementing a mathematics learning program in the classroom, it might be important to know whether students with specific characteristics need more encouragement to make use of this learning opportunity. Objectives: Using a supply‐use model, we analysed the predictive power of students' cognitive characteristics (prior mathematics knowledge), personality traits (conscientiousness), motivational‐affective characteristics (mathematics self‐concept and mathematics anxiety), and family background characteristics (socioeconomic status and migration background) for practising with an adaptive arithmetic learning program. Methods: We used longitudinal data from 203 fifth graders from seven non‐academic‐track schools in Germany. Practice behaviour, measured by completed tasks in the learning program, was recorded weekly for every student over a period of 22 weeks. Results and Conclusions: The results of our multilevel analyses showed that mathematics anxious students practised less with the program. We did not find any relationship with the other characteristics. Takeaways: Our results suggest that mathematics anxious students need more encouragement when practising with a mathematics learning program;otherwise, they do not get the chance to benefit from the use. Lay Description: What is already known about this topic: The use of mathematics learning programmes in mathematics education has recently intensified.It is important that students practice with such learning programmes regularly over a longer period of time in order for them to achieve learning success.Students differ in their mathematics learning behaviour. What this paper adds: Little is known about how person characteristics are related to practice behaviour with mathematics learning programmes.Students may differ in their use of a mathematics learning programme, which is why cognitive characteristics, personality traits, motivational‐affective characteristics, and family background characteristics may affect students' practice behaviour. Implications for practice: Mathematics anxious students practiced less with a mathematics learning program, and need more encouragement to benefit equally from the implementation in school.Teachers should keep in mind that after the initial enthusiasm, practice with a programme may decrease over time, especially after school holidays.

2.
Brown University Child & Adolescent Behavior Letter ; 39(6):7-7, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2316149

ABSTRACT

Researchers have found that women who deliver babies in the midst of a pandemic are more likely to have mental health consequences, including postpartum depression, and their infants are likely to suffer as well, if the stressors are not mitigated. The cohort study of 318 mothers in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom found that COVID‐related stress was significantly associated with poor postpartum mental health and increased negative affectivity among infants.

3.
British Journal of Social Work ; 53(2):1225-1242, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2277880

ABSTRACT

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, social work and social care practitioners had some the worst working conditions of any sector in the UK. During the pandemic, data revealed that social care occupations had higher COVID infection and mortality rates than the general population. The article reports the changing working conditions (measured via the Work-Related Quality of Life scale) and well-being (measured via the Short Warwich–Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale) of UK social care and social workers across three timepoints between May 2020 and July 2021 through an online cross-sectional survey of working conditions and well-being. Analysis of variance demonstrated that both well-being and working conditions were significantly poorer in July 2021 (phase 3 [ n  = 1,606]) than the previous two phases (n  = 2,523 and n  = 2,424, respectively), suggesting that both working conditions and well-being worsened within the social care and social work workforce across the pandemic. Furthermore, each of career satisfaction, working conditions, control, general well-being and home–work interface predicted poorer well-being at Time 3. Whilst chronically poor working conditions can lead to poorer individual psychological and physiological health outcomes, our findings highlight continually poor conditions in this sector, with potential further impacts on organisations and the service users that social care workers support. It is therefore important that individuals, organisations and government develop mechanisms to support these critical workers during and following the pandemic.

4.
Journal of Social Work ; 23(2):165-188, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2277879

ABSTRACT

Summary : Stress and mental health are among the biggest causes of sickness absence in the UK, with the Social Work and Social Care sectors having among the highest levels of stress and mental health sickness absence of all professions in the UK. Chronically poor working conditions are known to impact employees' psychological and physiological health. The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has affected both the mode and method of work in Social Care and Social Work. Through a series of cross-sectional online surveys, completed by a total of 4,950 UK Social Care and Social Workers, this study reports the changing working conditions and well-being of UK Social Care and Social Workers at two time points (phases) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings : All working conditions and well-being measures were found to be significantly worse during Phase 2 (November–January 2021) than Phase 1 (May–July 2020), with worse psychological well-being than the UK average in Phase 2. Furthermore, our findings indicate that in January 2021, feelings about general well-being, control at work, and working conditions predicted worsened psychological well-being. Applications : Our findings highlight the importance of understanding and addressing the impact of the pandemic on the Social Care and Social Work workforce, thus highlighting that individuals, organizations, and governments need to develop mechanisms to support these employees during and beyond the pandemic.

5.
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment ; 33(3):366-381, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2277447

ABSTRACT

Social distancing as a health-related behavior during epidemics and pandemics, can significantly influence their control. In this regard, the identification of the factors influencing behavior change can play a remarkable role in assessing for how behaviors form. This paper is an attempt to show that the extended theory of planned behavior can provide a useful theoretical framework for explaining social distancing in the face of a contagion disease. The results showed that the constructs of attitude, descriptive norms, perceived behavioral control, and self-efficacy significantly influenced the students' intention to adhere to social distancing in the form of university closure. Among these constructs, self-efficacy was found to be the main predictor of the students' intention. Interestingly, the research revealed that injunctive norms were not a significant predictor of the students' intention. Practically, this study is a justification for the use of attitude, descriptive norms, perceived behavioral control, and self-efficacy in planning and decision-making for encouraging students to adhere to social distancing during epidemics and pandemics, like the COVID-19 pandemic. The extended theory of planned behavior is useful in understanding Iranian College Students' Intention toward Social Distancing in COVID-19 Pandemic.

6.
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability ; 48(1):85-90, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2274167

ABSTRACT

Since COVID-19, remote consultation (by telephone and video) has become widespread. This study investigated the experience of using remote consultation in Specialist Intellectual Disability Community services. A total of 126 health staff working across eight Specialist Intellectual Disability Community teams in the NHS Health Board of Greater Glasgow and Clyde were asked to complete a short Likert-scale survey about remote consultation. There were 61 (48%) respondents from a range of disciplines. Overall, respondents were positive about remote consultation but found it was often inadequate to complete a full patient assessment. Moving forwards, respondents wanted around 60% of all consultations to remain face-to-face. It was significantly more difficult to engage and communicate with patients with more severe levels of disability. Remote consultation has been successful, but there is still a need for face-to-face assessment in intellectual disability services, particularly when working with people with more severe levels of disability.

7.
Journal of Counseling & Development ; 101(2):193-203, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2262900

ABSTRACT

Following a population‐based randomized design, we investigated changes of school counselors' psychological empowerment, multicultural competence, and leadership practice, as well as their perception of school climate from before to during COVID‐19. Specifically, school counselors were randomized into two conditions: (a) the pre‐COVID‐19 condition (n = 506) and (b) the current‐COVID‐19 condition (n = 542). Participants in the pre‐COVID condition responded to survey items following a retrospective manner based on their experiences between September 2019 and March 2020. We found that participants in the current COVID‐19 condition scored significantly higher in psychological empowerment and perceived school climate and lower in multicultural competence and leadership practices compared to the participants in the pre‐COVID‐19 condition. Regardless of directionality of changes, results supported the significant impacts that the pandemic had on school counselors' roles related to addressing systemic issues. We discussed implications of the results to school counseling practice and school counselor training.

8.
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education & Practice ; 18(1):78-93, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2245786

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore the well-being and experiences of working from home (WFH) for psychology staff across a range of specialties working within one health board in Scotland during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 161 clinical psychology professionals took part in an online survey that explored experiences of WFH during the COVID-19 pandemic and assessed well-being during this period. Findings: A number of challenges with WFH were identified, including challenges with carrying out clinical work (e.g. communication difficulties, risk assessment) and fewer opportunities for collaborative working and technical/equipment issues. During the WFH period, 46% experienced fatigue, 45% felt stressed and anxious and 30% felt lonely and isolated, compared to normal. Physical health complaints were also common with 37% experiencing aches/pains in back compared to normal and 40% experiencing headaches or migraines. Practical implications: Remote therapy should be directed to those with less complex needs or who require straightforward assessments. There should be increased access to occupational health assessments and provision of ergonomic furniture when WFH, and all staff should be supported to access well-being resources available within the health board. Further evaluation should be carried out to support evidence-based practice of remote clinical work. Originality/value: Few studies have explored the experiences of WFH and/or remotely from the perspectives of clinical psychologists in a Scottish health board. It is expected that this way of working will continue, albeit to a smaller extent;therefore, WFH policy will be informed by the findings.

9.
British Journal of Social Work ; 53(1):405-424, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2241886

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 brought about drastic changes in day-to-day life and working practices, and had a profound impact on the mental health and well-being of the general population. Certain professional groups have also been particularly affected. This study sought to explore how levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support amongst social work staff changed during the pandemic. We present the results from a series of surveys conducted in four local authorities (LAs) in England, before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Social workers and other social care staff (n  = 62) were asked about their experiences of psychological distress, using the twelve-item General Health Questionnaire. Overall, we found the proportion of staff reporting elevated levels of psychological distress increased and, in line with previous studies involving social workers, was high relative to the general population. Yet, most staff also said they had high levels of support from managers and colleagues, whilst a small proportion reported an increased perception of workplace support during the pandemic, compared to before. We consider these findings in relation to Organisational Support Theory and reflect on the ability of LAs to provide effective support for social care staff.

10.
International Journal of Nursing Education ; 14(2):50-57, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1836625

ABSTRACT

Background-Covid-19 Pandemic has proved the Nurse's crucial role in health care delivery system and providing nursing care to critically ill patients. It is a challenge for nurses as they need to be astute, competent, compassionate and critical thinker when they have to take care of patients on mechanical ventilator. Aim-To assess knowledge and practices regarding care of patients on mechanical ventilator among nursing personnel before and after administration ofNursing Care Bundle (NCB) in experimental and comparison group. Material and method. A Quasi Experimental non Equivalent comparison group pretest post test design used in thus study. 65 nursing personnels (30 experimental and 35 comparison groups) were selected from hospitals of North India using convenience sampling technique. NCB was administered in experimental group. Structured knowledge questionairre, Structured Observation Checklist for practices was used to collect data before and after intervention. Results-The mean post test knowledge and practices scores of nursing personnel in experimental and comparison groups were (21.6 ± 3.84, 30.83 ± 4.51) and (17.54 ± 2.76, 19.54 ± 4.17) respectively. There was significant difference between mean pre test and post test knowledge and practices scores (p=0.00).There was statistically no significant correlation between post test knowledge and practices score [r=0.16 (0.39)] among nursing personnel in experimental group at the level of significance 0.05.There was significant association of selected variable in area of gender (0.02) in experimental and education (0.02) in comparison group with pre test knowledge scores , also there was a significant association of selected variable in area of gender in experimental (0.03) and present area of working (0.03) in comparison group with pre test practices score. Conclusion-Nursing Care Bundle was effective in improving knowledge and practices of nursing personnel.

11.
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups ; 6(6):1737-1752, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1598501

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Although the COVID-19 pandemic had been impacting K--12 education since spring 2020, educational professionals working in schools faced unique challenges at the beginning of the 2020-2021 school year. This study focused on gaining a deeper understanding of the experiences of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) during the first half of the 2020-2021 school year and comparing these experiences to the previous spring. Method: This study involved a survey of 333 school-based SLPs working across the United States. The results of the survey were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively to identify key themes and trends related to communication, service delivery models, changes in job requirements, confidence levels, and personal challenges.

12.
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups ; 6(6):1832-1856, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1597042

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore parents' and therapists' views of the benefits and challenges of telepractice for early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: Surveys probed the views of (a) parents and (b) Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) Certified Auditory Verbal Therapists (AVTs) in using telepractice to deliver auditory verbal (AV) sessions. The survey for parents covered technology, coaching, communication, learnings for the parent, learnings for the child, and parental preference. The survey for the therapists examined therapy style, technology, relationships with families, and coaching style. Using a convenience sample of 65 families and nine LSLS Certified AVTs, data were collected using Google Forms. Results: A response rate of 42% was achieved for the parents' survey. Families were overwhelmingly confident in the subjective effectiveness of AV sessions delivered by telepractice with modal ratings of 8 and 9 on a 10-point rating scale for telepractice sessions and in-person sessions, respectively. On average, however, parents rated in-person sessions at a significantly higher level. Eighty-five percent opted to continue with either AV delivered solely via telepractice or a blend of telepractice and in-person sessions. Changes in therapists' style included (a) increased interactions with the parent rather than the child and (b) an improvement in coaching techniques. Eight of nine therapists (89%) felt that sessions delivered via telepractice were equally effective as or more effective than in-person sessions. Discussion: The necessary transfer of all AV sessions to telepractice from inperson sessions during the global pandemic of COVID-19 was enacted successfully for the majority of families. Both parents and therapists described benefits and challenges of telepractice for AV intervention. Going forward, the high proportion of families requested either a blended service delivery of telepractice and in-person sessions or therapy via telepractice alone, demonstrating the families' satisfaction with this approach.

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