Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 2.571
Filter
1.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199519

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThis study examined how public health (PH) and occupational health (OH) sectors worked together and separately, in four different Canadian provinces to address COVID-19 as it affected at-risk workers. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 OH and PH experts between June to December 2021. Responses about how PH and OH worked across disciplines to protect workers were analyzed. MethodsWe conducted a qualitative analysis to identify Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) in multisectoral collaboration, and implications for prevention approaches. ResultsWe found strengths in the new ways the PH and OH worked together in several instances;and identified weaknesses in the boundaries that constrain PH and OH sectors and relate to communication with the public. Threats to worker protections were revealed in policy gaps. Opportunities existed to enhance multisectoral PH and OH collaboration and the response to the risk of COVID-19 and potentially other infectious diseases to better protect the health of workers. DiscussionMultisectoral collaboration and mutual learning may offer ways to overcome challenges that threaten and constrain cooperation between PH and OH. A more synchronized approach to addressing workers' occupational determinants of health could better protect workers and the public from infectious diseases.

2.
Frontiers in public health ; 10:1016169, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2199487

ABSTRACT

Background: The need for effective public health surveillance systems to track virus spread for targeted interventions was highlighted during the COVID-19 pandemic. It spurred an interest in the use of spatiotemporal clustering and genomic analyses to identify high-risk areas and track the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, these two approaches are rarely combined in surveillance systems to complement each one's limitations;spatiotemporal clustering approaches usually consider only one source of virus transmission (i.e., the residential setting) to detect case clusters, while genomic studies require significant resources and processing time that can delay decision-making. Here, we clarify the differences and possible synergies of these two approaches in the context of infectious disease surveillance systems by investigating to what extent geographically-defined clusters are confirmed as transmission clusters based on genome sequences, and how genomic-based analyses can improve the epidemiological investigations associated with spatiotemporal cluster detection. Method(s): For this purpose, we sequenced the SARS-CoV-2 genomes of 172 cases that were part of a collection of spatiotemporal clusters found in a Swiss state (Vaud) during the first epidemic wave. We subsequently examined intra-cluster genetic similarities and spatiotemporal distributions across virus genotypes. Result(s): Our results suggest that the congruence between the two approaches might depend on geographic features of the area (rural/urban) and epidemic context (e.g., lockdown). We also identified two potential superspreading events that started from cases in the main urban area of the state, leading to smaller spreading events in neighboring regions, as well as a large spreading in a geographically-isolated area. These superspreading events were characterized by specific mutations assumed to originate from Mulhouse and Milan, respectively. Our analyses propose synergistic benefits of using two complementary approaches in public health surveillance, saving resources and improving surveillance efficiency. Copyright © 2022 Choi, Ladoy, De Ridder, Jacot, Vuilleumier, Bertelli, Guessous, Pillonel, Joost and Greub.

3.
Emerging infectious diseases ; 29(2), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2198462

ABSTRACT

Genomic data provides useful information for public health practice, particularly when combined with epidemiologic data. However, sampling bias is a concern because inferences from nonrandom data can be misleading. In March 2021, the Washington State Department of Health, USA, partnered with submitting and sequencing laboratories to establish sentinel surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 genomic data. We analyzed available genomic and epidemiologic data during presentinel and sentinel periods to assess representativeness and timeliness of availability. Genomic data during the presentinel period was largely unrepresentative of all COVID-19 cases. Data available during the sentinel period improved representativeness for age, death from COVID-19, outbreak association, long-term care facility-affiliated status, and geographic coverage;timeliness of data availability and captured viral diversity also improved. Hospitalized cases were underrepresented, indicating a need to increase inpatient sampling. Our analysis emphasizes the need to understand and quantify sampling bias in phylogenetic studies and continue evaluation and improvement of public health surveillance systems.

4.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ; 260(10):1144, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2198262
5.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association ; : 1-10, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2198259

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of SARS-CoV-2 in companion animals detected through both passive and active surveillance in the US. ANIMALS: 204 companion animals (109 cats, 95 dogs) across 33 states with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections between March 2020 and December 2021. PROCEDURES: Public health officials, animal health officials, and academic researchers investigating zoonotic SARS-CoV-2 transmission events reported clinical, laboratory, and epidemiologic information through a standardized One Health surveillance process developed by the CDC and partners. RESULT(S): Among dogs and cats identified through passive surveillance, 94% (n = 87) had reported exposure to a person with COVID-19 before infection. Clinical signs of illness were present in 74% of pets identified through passive surveillance and 27% of pets identified through active surveillance. Duration of illness in pets averaged 15 days in cats and 12 days in dogs. The average time between human and pet onset of illness was 10 days. Viral nucleic acid was first detected at 3 days after exposure in both cats and dogs. Antibodies were detected starting 5 days after exposure, and titers were highest at 9 days in cats and 14 days in dogs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results of the present study supported that cats and dogs primarily become infected with SARS-CoV-2 following exposure to a person with COVID-19, most often their owners. Case investigation and surveillance that include both people and animals are necessary to understand transmission dynamics and viral evolution of zoonotic diseases like SARS-CoV-2.

6.
JMIR Public Health and Surveillance ; 8(12), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2198118

ABSTRACT

Background: Major sports events are the focus of the world. However, the gathering of crowds during these events creates huge risks of infectious diseases transmission, posing a significant public health threat. Objective: The aim of this study was to systematically review the epidemiological characteristics and prevention measures of infectious diseases at major sports events. Methods: The procedure of this scoping review followed Arksey and O'Malley's five-step methodological framework. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase, were searched systematically. The general information (ie, publication year, study type) of each study, sports events' features (ie, date and host location), infectious diseases' epidemiological characteristics (ie, epidemics, risk factors), prevention measures, and surveillance paradigm were extracted, categorized, and summarized. Results: A total of 24,460 articles were retrieved from the databases and 358 studies were included in the final data synthesis based on selection criteria. A rapid growth of studies was found over recent years. The number of studies investigating epidemics and risk factors for sports events increased from 16/254 (6.3%) before 2000 to 201/254 (79.1%) after 2010. Studies focusing on prevention measures of infectious diseases accounted for 85.0% (238/280) of the articles published after 2010. A variety of infectious diseases have been reported, including respiratory tract infection, gastrointestinal infection, vector-borne infection, blood-borne infection, and water-contact infection. Among them, respiratory tract infections were the most concerning diseases (250/358, 69.8%). Besides some routine prevention measures targeted at risk factors of different diseases, strengthening surveillance was highlighted in the literature. The surveillance system appeared to have gone through three stages of development, including manual archiving, network-based systems, and automated intelligent platforms. Conclusions: This critical summary and collation of previous empirical evidence is meaningful to provide references for holding major sports events. It is essential to improve the surveillance techniques for timely detection of the emergence of epidemics and to improve risk perception in future practice.

7.
Revista Bioetica ; 30(4):697-704, 2023.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2197539

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic saw unprecedented responses to the allocation of scarce and insufficient triage resources and to the difficulties in establishing containment measures, which oscillated between suggestive, persuasive and coercive. Classical triage criteria were replaced by extreme utilitarianism based on objectively evaluated medical criteria to privilege the critically ill with a recoverable prognosis by applying extreme support and treatment measures. Mandatory containment measures and the call for vaccination failed to achieve convincing scientific support;applied irregularly and plagued by uncertainties and insecurities, they affected disadvantaged groups and caused public outcry and disrespect. Triage based on utilitarian medical criteria caused distress and serious mental strains in medical decision-makers and members of ad hoc committees. These experiences suggest renewing the individualistic and elitist bioethical discourse to privilege the common good over individual interests. © 2023, Conselho Federal de Medicina. All rights reserved.

8.
Cadernos EBAPEBR ; 20(6):105-119, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2197516

ABSTRACT

Este artigo apresenta resultados sobre a satisfação e a conciliação da vida profissional e familiar das mulheres em teletrabalho na Gerência Gerai de Portos, Aeroportos, Fronteiras e Recintos Alfandegados (GGPAF) da Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (Anvisa). Elegemos a Anvisa por ser pioneira na implementação do teletrabalho, adotado na Instituição em 2016. Mesmo com o acúmulo de papéis e responsabilidades domésticas, durante a pandemia, as trabalhadoras optaram pelas potencialidades do teletrabalho. Em termos metodológicos, a pesquisa que subsidia os resultados apresentados neste artigo pode ser caracterizada como de abordagem qualitativa, conduzida por meio de entrevistas semiestruturadas. Para a análise dos dados, foram consideradas cinco categorias centrais: qualidade de vida;convívio familiar;produtividade e motivação;organização pessoal;percepção de satisfação com o teletrabalho. Após a transcrição das entrevistas, os dados foram analisados tendo por base o método de análise de conteúdo por categoria. Como resultado, tem-se que, de modo geral, as mulheres estão satisfeitas com o teletrabalho. A maioria considera benefícios e melhorias na qualidade de vida com o teletrabalho, não obstante as desvantagens do isolamento social e o acúmulo de tarefas e responsabilidades domésticas. A contribuição do estudo consiste em ampliar o campo de conhecimento sobre o teletrabalho no período anterior e durante a pandemia, podendo projetar luz para o delineamento de politicas de gestão de pessoas que considerem a importância das mulheres no mundo do trabalho e contemplem o equilíbrio entre vida familiar e profissional.Alternate :Esta investigación discute la satisfacción y conciliación de la vida profesional y familiar de mujeres que actúan en la Dirección General de Puertos, Aeropuertos, Fronteras y Zonas Aduaneras (GGPAF) de la Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (Anvisa). Elegimos a Anvlsa porsu papel pionero en la implementáción del teletrabajo, adoptado en la institución en 2016. Aún con la acumulación de roles y responsabilidades domésticas, durante la pandemia, las trabajadoras optaron por el potencial del teletrabajo. La metodología que sustenta los resultados presentados en este artículo se puede caracterizar como un enfoque cualitativo basado en entrevistas semlestructuradas. Para el análisis de datos se consideraron cinco categorías clave: calidad de vida, vida familiar;productividad y motivación;organización personal;y percepción de satisfacción con el teletrabajo. Una vez realizada la transcripción de las entrevistas, se analizaron los datos con base en el método de análisis de contenido por categoría. Los resultados indican que, en general, las mujeres están satisfechas con el teletrabajo. La mayoría considera que el teletrabajo aportó beneficios y mejoras a la calidad de vida, a pesar de las desventajas del aislamiento social, la demanda de productividad y la acumulación de tareas y obligaciones del hogar. Una de las principales contribuciones de la investigación es la ampliación del campo de conocimiento sobre el teletrabajo en el período anterior y durante la pandemia, lo que podrá arrojar luz sobre el diseño de políticas de gestión de personas que consideren la Importancia de la mujer en el mundo laboral y contemplen el equilibrio entre vida familiar y profesional.Alternate :This research discusses the satisfaction and conciliation of professional and family life of women who work in the General Management of Ports, Airports, Borders, and Customs Areas (GGPAF) of the National Health Surveillance Agency (Anvisa). We chose Anvisa for its pioneering role in implementing teleworking, adopted at the institution in 2016. It is a health-related institution, and a high proportion of women work remotely in the Management department-the focus point of the study. Although women working at Anvisa accumulated roles and domestic responsibilities during the pandemic, they opted for the potential of telework. Th methodology that underpins the results presented in this article can be characterized as a qualitative approach based on semi-structured interviews. During the analysis, five key categories gained substantial attention: quality of life, family life, productivity and motivation, personal organization, and perception of satisfaction with telework. After transcribing the interviews, we analyzed the data using content analysis. Results showed that women are satisfied with teleworking and perceive benefits and gains in quality of life with teleworking despite the disadvantages of social distancing and the accumulation of household tasks and obligations. The study offers a significant contribution to building the field of knowledge about teleworking before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Also, the research may help to formulate people management policies that consider the importance of women in the world of work, focusing on the work and family life balance.

9.
PLOS Water ; 1(11), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2197191

ABSTRACT

We developed and implemented a framework for examining how molecular assay sensitivity for a viral RNA genome target affects its utility for wastewater-based epidemiology. We applied this framework to digital droplet RT-PCR measurements of SARS-CoV-2 and Pepper Mild Mottle Virus genes in wastewater. Measurements were made using 10 replicate wells which allowed for high assay sensitivity, and therefore enabled detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA even when COVID-19 incidence rates were relatively low (~10−5). We then used a computational downsampling approach to determine how using fewer replicate wells to measure the wastewater concentration reduced assay sensitivity and how the resultant reduction affected the ability to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA at various COVID-19 incidence rates. When percent of positive droplets was between 0.024% and 0.5% (as was the case for SARS-CoV-2 genes during the Delta surge), measurements obtained with 3 or more wells were similar to those obtained using 10. When percent of positive droplets was less than 0.024% (as was the case prior to the Delta surge), then 6 or more wells were needed to obtain similar results as those obtained using 10 wells. When COVID-19 incidence rate is low (~ 10−5), as it was before the Delta surge and SARS-CoV-2 gene concentrations are <104 cp/g, using 6 wells will yield a detectable concentration 90% of the time. Overall, results support an adaptive approach where assay sensitivity is increased by running 6 or more wells during periods of low SARS-CoV-2 gene concentrations, and 3 or more wells during periods of high SARS-CoV-2 gene concentrations.

10.
Globalization and Health ; 18(1) (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2196359

ABSTRACT

Background: Claims of inconsistency in epidemiological data have emerged for both developed and developing countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method(s): In this paper, we apply first-digit Newcomb-Benford Law (NBL) and Kullback-Leibler Divergence (KLD) to evaluate COVID-19 records reliability in all 20 Latin American countries. We replicate country-level aggregate information from Our World in Data. Result(s): We find that official reports do not follow NBL's theoretical expectations (n = 978;chi-square = 78.95;KS = 4.33, MD = 2.18;mantissa =.54;MAD =.02;DF = 12.75). KLD estimates indicate high divergence among countries, including some outliers. Conclusion(s): This paper provides evidence that recorded COVID-19 cases in Latin America do not conform overall to NBL, which is a useful tool for detecting data manipulation. Our study suggests that further investigations should be made into surveillance systems that exhibit higher deviation from the theoretical distribution and divergence from other similar countries. Copyright © 2022, The Author(s).

11.
Medicine Access @ Point of Care ; 6, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2195979

ABSTRACT

Background: Substandard and falsified (SF) medical products are removed from circulation through a process called ‘product recall' by medicines regulatory agencies. In Zambia, the Zambia Medicines Regulatory Authority (ZAMRA) is responsible for recalling SF medical products from the Zambian market through passive and active surveillance methods. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of recalls of SF medical products and to analyse the frequently recalled therapeutic categories, dosage forms, categories of defects that led to the recalls and their sources with respect to the country of the marketing authorisation holder (MAH) or manufacturer. Methods: We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional review of the product recalls issued by ZAMRA between January 2018 and December 2021. A search for all medical product alerts and recalls issued by ZAMRA was carried out by reviewing the internal post-marketing surveillance database kept at ZAMRA headquarters. Data were extracted using a structured Excel database and analysed using Microsoft Excel. Results: A total of 119 alerts were received during the review period, of which 83 (69.7%) were product recalls. Oral solid dosage forms were the most recalled dosage form (53%). Furthermore, the number of recalls increased in 2020 (44.6%) and 2021 (22.9%), with the majority (20.5%) of the recalled products being substandard products classified as antiseptics and disinfectants and were attributed to the high demand during the COVID-19 pandemic. Manufacturing laboratory control issues were the reason for product recall in almost half (47.4%) of the cases. Most of the products recalled originated from India (38.6%), followed by Zambia (25.3%). Only one suspected falsified product was recalled between 2018 and 2021. A total of 66 recalls of the 83 products were initiated by ZAMRA, with only 17 voluntarily by foreign MAHs. No product recall was initiated by the local representatives of foreign manufacturers or MAH. Conclusion: The majority of the pharmaceutical product recalls in Zambia were substandard products. Manufacturing laboratory control issues lead to most recalls and require investigation of the root causes, preventive action, and strict compliance with the good manufacturing practices guidelines by manufacturers.

12.
J Sch Nurs ; : 10598405221144259, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2195057

ABSTRACT

This article shares what was learned from the feasibility assessment of a nurse-led school-based active surveillance (SBAS) pilot to track chronic absenteeism using myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) as an exemplar. This pilot encompassed a 3-year period with training and feedback from school nurses (SNs) on data collection and ME/CFS. SNs found that the SBAS process helped them effectively identifying undiagnosed conditions. The assessment revealed the importance of focusing outreach efforts and establishing relationships with the school leadership in developing health policies and programs in the school setting. The pilot data were used to develop a manual to guide SNs for the SBAS process. This can be viewed as a model for SNs in establishing a surveillance to identify and track conditions like ME/CFS. With overlapping symptoms of Long COVID to ME/CFS, this assessment may provide insights for additional efforts to understand the impact of Long COVID on students' education.

13.
Urban Studies (Sage Publications, Ltd.) ; : 1, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2194775

ABSTRACT

This article presents an analysis of European smart city narratives and how they evolved under the pressure of the COVID-19 pandemic. We start with Joss et al.'s observation that the smart-city discourse is presently in flux, engaged in intensive boundary-work and struggling to gain wider support. We approach this process from the critical perspective of surveillance capitalism, as proposed by Zuboff, to highlight the growing privacy concerns related to technological development. Our results are based on analysing 184 articles regarding smart-city solutions, published on social media by five European journals between 2017 and 2021. We adopted both human and machine coding processes for qualitative and quantitative analysis of our data. As a result, we identified the main actors and four dominant narratives: regulation of artificial intelligence and facial recognition, technological fight with the climate emergency, contact tracing apps and the potential of 5G technology to boost the digitalisation processes. Our analysis shows the growing number of positive narratives underlining the importance of technology in fighting the pandemic and mitigating the climate emergency, but the latter is often mentioned in a tokenistic fashion. Right to privacy considerations are central for two out of four discovered topics. We found that the main rationale for the development of surveillance technologies relates to the competitiveness of the EU in the global technological rivalry, while ambitions like increasing societal well-being or safeguarding the transparency of new policies are nearly non-existent. (English) [ FROM AUTHOR]

14.
Global Governance ; 28(4):562-586, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2194437

ABSTRACT

Promoting stability is a core component of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) surveillance's mandate. The Covid-19 pandemic hit almost every country worldwide. This article evaluates whether and how the IMF surveillance documents in the aftermath of the health and economic crisis have identified risks and mitigation measures to improve health outcomes, protect vulnerable people and firms, and address climate change. Through the IMF COVID-19 Surveillance Monitor, a textual analysis index, the authors found that these issues received relatively little attention in Article IV consultations in 2019, with fiscal issues dominating the discussion. However, the consultations conducted in 2020 show some timely incremental shifts and more attention toward health systems and protecting vulnerable matters. While climate change has become a key part of senior IMF official narratives, it has not had a significant presence in surveillance activities. The techniques and indices developed here can help the IMF improve its surveillance policy. © 2022 Copyright 2022 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.

15.
Facets ; 7:1493-1597, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2193950

ABSTRACT

Wastewater surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 RNA is a relatively recent adaptation of long-standing wastewater surveillance for infectious and other harmful agents. Individuals infected with COVID-19 were found to shed SARS-CoV-2 in their faeces. Researchers around the world confirmed that SARS-CoV-2 RNA fragments could be detected and quantified in community wastewater. Canadian academic researchers, largely as volunteer initiatives, reported proof-of-concept by April 2020. National collaboration was initially facilitated by the Canadian Water Network.Many public health officials were initially skeptical about actionable information being provided by wastewater surveillance even though experience has shown that public health surveillance for a pandemic has no single, perfect approach. Rather, different approaches provide different insights, each with its own strengths and limitations. Public health science must triangulate among different forms of evidence to maximize understanding of what is happening or may be expected. Well-conceived, resourced, and implemented wastewater-based platforms can provide a cost-effective approach to support other conventional lines of evidence. Sustaining wastewater monitoring platforms for future surveillance of other disease targets and health states is a challenge. Canada can benefit from taking lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic to develop forward-looking interpretive frameworks and capacity to implement, adapt, and expand such public health surveil-lance capabilities.

16.
BMJ : British Medical Journal (Online) ; 380, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2193722

ABSTRACT

Considering alternatives makes sense, but form must follow function

17.
Microbiol Spectr ; : e0417422, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2193582

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to provide information about immunity against COVID-19 along with risk factors and behavior among employees in day care facilities and preschools (DCS) in Denmark. In collaboration with the Danish Union of Pedagogues, during February and March 2021, 47,810 members were offered a point-of-care rapid SARS-CoV-2 antibody test (POCT) at work and were invited to fill in an electronic questionnaire covering COVID-19 exposure. Seroprevalence data from Danish blood donors (total Ig enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) were used as a proxy for the Danish population. A total of 21,018 (45%) DCS employees completed the questionnaire and reported their POCT result median age, 44.3 years (interquartile range [IQR], [32.7 to 53.6]);females, 84.1%, of which 20,267 (96.4%) were unvaccinated and included in analysis. A total of 1,857 (9.2%) participants tested seropositive, significantly higher than a seroprevalence at 7.6% (risk ratio [RR], 1.2;95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 1.27) among 40,541 healthy blood donors (median age, 42 years [IQR, 28 to 53];males, 51.3%). Exposure at work (RR, 2.9;95% CI, 2.3 to 3.6) was less of a risk factor than exposure within the household (RR, 12.7;95% CI, 10.2 to 15.8). Less than 25% of participants reported wearing face protection at work. Most of the participants expressed some degree of fear of contracting COVID-19 both at work and outside work. SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence was slightly higher in DCS staff than in blood donors, but possible exposure at home was associated with a higher risk than at work. DCS staff expressed fear of contracting COVID-19, though there was limited use of face protection at work. IMPORTANCE Identifying at-risk groups and evaluating preventive interventions in at-risk groups is imperative for the ongoing pandemic as well as for the control of future epidemics. Although DCS staff have a much higher risk of being infected within their own household than at their workplace, most are fearful of being infected with COVID-19 or bringing COVID-19 to work. This represents an interesting dilemma and an important issue which should be addressed by public health authorities for risk communication and pandemic planning. This study design can be used in a strategy for ongoing surveillance of COVID-19 immunity or other infections in the population. The findings of this study can be used to assess the need for future preventive interventions in DCS, such as the use of personal protective equipment.

18.
Science ; 379(6627):26-27, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2193409

ABSTRACT

Dating back to the origins of modern epidemiology, wastewater surveillance has predominantly been used to track pathogens spread by fecal-oral transmission such as those that cause cholera and polio. However, more than just these "enteric” pathogens are shed via the gut, as highlighted by the success of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) wastewater surveillance (1, 2), recent work on tracking influenza virus (3) and monkeypox virus (4), and observations of extensive pathogen diversity in stool (5, 6). Wastewater is now a core component of infectious disease monitoring, providing a variant-specific, community-representative picture of public health trends that captures previously undetected spread and pathogen transmission links. Building on recent laboratory and analytical advances to identify the diverse pathogens present in sewage will be essential to ongoing efforts to understand disease risks and will transform infectious disease surveillance.

19.
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series a-Statistics in Society ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2193232
20.
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Statistics in Society ; 185(4):1471-1496, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2193225

ABSTRACT

The statistical community mobilised vigorously from the start of the 2020 SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic, following the RSS's long tradition of offering our expertise to help society tackle important issues that require evidence‐based decisions. This address aims to capture the highlights of our collective engagement in the pandemic, and the difficulties faced in delivering statistical design and analysis at pace and in communicating to the wider public the many complex issues that arose. I argue that these challenges gave impetus to fruitful new directions in the merging of statistical principles with constraints of agility, responsiveness and societal responsibilities. The lessons learned from this will strengthen the long‐term impact of the discipline and of the Society. The need to evaluate policies even in emergency, and to strive for statistical interoperability in future disease surveillance systems is highlighted. In my final remarks, I look towards the future landscape for statistics in the fast‐moving world of data science and outline a strategy of visible and growing engagement of the RSS with the data science ecosystem, building on the central position of statistics.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL