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1.
Personality and Individual Differences Vol 192 2022, ArtID 111589 ; 192, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1839183

ABSTRACT

To be or not to be quarantined? That is the question posed by COVID-19 pandemic to almost every resident in the world. Approximately three months after the first application of the COVID-19 lockdown to residents in 17 Asian, African, European, American, and Oceanian countries, we carried out a cross-national survey of 26,266 residents via online platforms such as Sojump and Prolific to investigate their willingness to quarantine and its influencing factors. Findings show that 1) The willingness to quarantine is low in countries with high long-term orientation;2) Females are more willing to be quarantined than males;3) Gender difference on willingness to quarantine is large among people with older age and low education. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed. Understanding how culture and demographics affect people's willingness to quarantine not only provides insight into how to respond to the current pandemic, but also helps the world prepare for future crises. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
International Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 118:34-43, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1838841

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We analysed hepatitis A (HepA) notifications and hospitalisations in Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and Sweden for available periods between 1995 and 2014. We aimed to investigate whether decreasing HepA incidence is associated with increasing age at infection and worsening HepA presentation and to identify groups at risk of severe disease.

3.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(7-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837905

ABSTRACT

Background: delusional memories, which are associated with discomfort and fear. Critical illness and treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU) is a traumatic event for patients and their families, which involves stress, anxiety, fear, worry and uncertainty. Survival and homecoming entail new challenges, and a significant proportion of patients and their families suffer from the long-term impact on their mental and/or physical health, termed post intensive care syndrome (PICS). In addition, patients can suffer from delusional memories, which are associated with discomfort and fear.Overall aim: The overall aim of the current thesis was to explore experiences and patterns of behaviours in critically ill patients and their family members, addressing the period from when the patient becomes critically ill until recovery/ everyday life at home.Methods: Four studies resulted in four papers. Data collection was performed with both quantitative and qualitative methods at five different ICUs in Sweden, consisting of university hospital, county hospital and district hospital. Study I was a prospective cohort study which aimed to describe and analyse factors associated with a health-related quality (HRQoL) of life 3, 6 and 12 months after discharge from a general surgical ICU. Included were 276 (62%) patients treated >= 96 hours in the ICU. For data collection, we used the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). To analyse changes over time, a linear mixed model was used. To compare the results from the 12-months, with a gender and age matched reference of a Swedish population, a Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used. Furthermore, a linear regression analysis was performed to explore the impact of the background variables on HRQoL. In Study II, we used a classic grounded theory methodology to explore the main concerns of patients cared for in an ICU. Data were collected at three different general ICUs in Sweden. Thirteen interviews initiated, with one open-ended question and seven observations of other patients in the ICU were performed and analysed. The aim of Study III was to explore delusional memories, and how they were managed by COVID-19 patients treated in an ICU. Data were collected at one medical intensive care unit in Sweden, through sixteen interviews, with three open-ended questions and one additional question on how the patient experienced being treated by health care professionals wearing protective equipment. The analysis was performed with thematic analysis. In Study IV, we used classic grounded theory methodology to explore the main concerns of family members of critically ill patients cared for in an ICU, from when the patient became critically ill until everyday life at home. Data were collected from three different general ICUs in Sweden. Fourteen interviews initiated with one open-ended question, and observations of eight other participants during the patient's ICU stay were analysed.Findings: Patients' HRQoL improves over time but is still affected one year after the ICU care. During their stay in the ICU, patients could experience delusional memories with unpleasant content often related to death, which could have a long-lasting impact even after discharge from the ICU. However, the experiences of critical illness and intensive care had a greater influence in patients' lives. For patients and even for the family members, critical illness and treatment in the ICU is an extremely emotional and stressful experience, with long-lasting impact on well-being and sense of losing control. Patients and their family members have different strategies to deal with critical illness, treatment in ICU, and complications of critical illness to regain control. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Gates Open Research ; 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835877

ABSTRACT

Background: For diseases like Covid-19, where it has been difficult to identify the true number of infected people, or where the number of known cases is heavily influenced by the number of tests performed, hospitalizations and deaths play a significant role in understanding the epidemic and in determining the appropriate response. However, the Covid-19 deaths data reported by some countries display a significant weekly variability, which can make the interpretation and use of the death data in analysis and modeling difficult. Methods: We derive the mathematical relationship between the series of new daily deaths by reporting date and the series of deaths by death date. We then apply this formalism to the corresponding time-series reported by Sweden during the Covid-19 pandemic. Results: The practice of reporting new deaths daily, as is standard procedure during an outbreak in most countries and regions, should be viewed as a time-dependent filter, modulating the underlying true death curve. After having characterized the Swedish reporting process, we show how smoothing of the Swedish reported daily deaths series results in a curve distinctly different from the true death curve. We also comment on the use of nowcasting methods. Conclusions: Modelers and analysts using the series of new daily deaths by reporting date should take extra care when it is highly variable and when there is a significant reporting delay. It might be appropriate to instead use the series of deaths by death date combined with a nowcasting algorithm as basis for their analysis.

5.
Sexes ; 2(3):272, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1834881

ABSTRACT

Sexual harassment against female migrant domestic workers is a public health problem, which remains hidden and largely underreported. The current paper presents the results of a qualitative research study on sexually victimized migrant domestic workers in four European countries (Austria, Cyprus, Greece, and Sweden). The study aimed at exploring the profile and experiences of victimised individuals. Data were gathered via 66 semi-structured interviews with victimised female migrant domestic workers. Key findings of the current study indicate that the victims: (a) were usually undocumented and had low local language skills;(b) identified domestic work as the only way into the labour market;(c) suffered primarily psychological, economic, and social consequences;(d) had poor social support networks;(e) were poorly connected to governmental support services. This is the first study to explore this hidden problem via direct contact with victims. Addressing barriers of migrants’ social integration seems important. Better regulation and monitoring of this low-skilled occupation could minimise risks for vulnerable employees.

6.
Adolescents ; 1(1):10, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1834678

ABSTRACT

What effect the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has had on adolescents’ psychosocial functioning is currently unknown. Using the data of 1767 (50.2% female and 49.8 male) adolescents in Sweden, we discuss adolescents’ thoughts and behaviors around the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as reported changes in substance use, everyday life, relations, victimization, and mental health during the outbreak. Results showed that (a) the majority of adolescents have been complying with regulations from the government;(b) although most adolescents did not report changes in their psychosocial functioning, a critical number reported more substance use, conflict with parents, less time spent with peers, and poorer control over their everyday life;and (c) the majority of adolescents have experienced less victimization, yet poorer mental health, during the COVID-19 outbreak. Adolescent girls and adolescents in distance schooling were likely to report negative changes in their psychosocial functioning during the COVID-19 outbreak. Based on these findings, we suggest that society should pay close attention to changes in adolescents’ psychosocial functioning during times of crisis.

7.
Euro Surveillance: Bulletin Europeen sur les Maladies Transmissibles = European Communicable Disease Bulletin ; 27(18), 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834267

ABSTRACT

We compared vaccine effectiveness against severe COVID-19 between December 2021 and March 2022 when Omicron BA.1 and BA.2 were the dominating SARS-CoV-2 variants in Scania county, Sweden. Effectiveness remained above 80% after the transition from BA.1 to BA.2 among people with at least three vaccine doses but the point estimate decreased markedly to 54% among those with only two doses. Protection from prior infection was also lower after the transition to BA.2. Booster vaccination seems necessary to maintain sufficient protection.

8.
Journal of Historical Research in Marketing ; 14(2):213-259, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1831701

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This paper aims to build on Fred Beard’s study of the world’s archives to identity historical advertising and marketing ephemera, published in this journal in 2018, by focussing on resources available in Europe to augment his survey.Design/methodology/approach>Online searching, supplemented by literature emanating from the business archive sector, led to the identification of 177 repositories or online sites in Europe holding advertising and marketing archives of significance for researchers. These are set out in two accompanying tables.Findings>A wide diversity of European archives that are open to researchers is revealed in this paper. Many are the archives of the business themselves, but a number of collecting repositories are also listed, brought together for the first time.Research limitations/implications>This paper focusses solely on Europe but does not claim to be comprehensive, as the study was time-limited and readers will, no doubt, know of resources that the author has missed. The findings relate mostly to Western Europe, so there is scope for further study to encompass archives in the former eastern bloc. Exploration of sources in Africa, Asia and Latin America would further supplement Beard’s original study.Originality/value>This research brings together the broadest list of advertising and marketing sources open to researchers in Europe published to date. As Beard’s focus was more on the Americas, this examination redresses the balance with an array of European sources which, it is hoped, will contribute to the greater use of many little-known or under-researched resources by researchers across the world.

9.
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health ; 49(7):675-820, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1823478

ABSTRACT

This special issue includes 19 articles focusing on the moral responsibility of governments and individuals in the context of the coronavirus pandemic;the challenges facing evidence-based decision making in the initial response to COVID-19;perceived consequences and worries among youth in Norway during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown;depression, anxiety and stress among Swedish university students during the second and third waves of COVID-19;anxiety and depressive symptoms of women in the perinatal period during the COVID-19 pandemic;risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure among hospital healthcare workers in relation to patient contact and type of care;impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the treatment of injuries during lockdown in Norway.

10.
Lakartidningen ; 118(11):16, 2021.
Article in Swedish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1824413

ABSTRACT

Data from the Swedish Renal Registry (SRR) show that during the period March 16, 2020 to March 15, 2021 0.4% of all renal transplant recipients and 3% of all dialysis patients died due to COVID-19 in Sweden. Of all registered deaths, 20% were attributed to COVID-19. In the age group 50-59 years the risk ratio for COVID-19 related mortality was 16 (95% CI 6.5-38) among transplant recipients and 22 (95% CI 7.1-69) among dialysis patients, compared to the background population in the same age group. Excess mortality, compared to the five years preceding the pandemic, was 30% for transplant recipients and 8.7% for dialysis patients, compared to 7.7% for the entire Swedish population. Detailed reports were sent to SRR for 864 patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection representing 5.0% of all transplant recipients and 13% of all dialysis patients. The case fatality rate was 7.0% and 21% respectively.

11.
Journal of Surgical Research ; 277:163-170, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1821397

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since March 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has affected healthcare systems worldwide. It is largely unknown how acutely ill surgical patients and their next of kin have perceived the hospital care during the ongoing pandemic. Therefore, we aimed to explore their experiences. Material and methods: We performed 12 interviews with patients who had undergone acute abdominal surgery in a public acute care hospital in Sweden during March to June 2020. In addition, we interviewed 10 of the patients’ next of kin. We analyzed the interviews using content analysis. Results: Our analysis resulted in two themes: “Worries about seeking acute care” and “The surgical care worked adequately, even though the system was overloaded.” The participants experienced that the hospital maintained its functionality during the ongoing pandemic. Both the patients and their next of kin experienced insufficient information by the hospital, especially during the initial acute phase and at discharge, which led to a perceived loss of control. The implemented ban on visitors was found to have had both positive and negative effects for the patients, whereas the next of kin's experiences focused on the difficulties with not being able to visit. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the challenges of communication with patients and their next of kin are exacerbated during a crisis such as a pandemic. In addition, a ban on visitors might have both positive and negative aspects. Therefore, we propose individualized routines for visits to acute surgical patients when possible.

12.
Jfr-Journal of Family Research ; 34(1):538-562, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1818909

ABSTRACT

Objective: This paper analyses intergenerational relationships in Sweden during the corona pandemic, with a special focus on practices of care. The research question is: How is care between generations - between grandparents, adult children and grandchildren - done during pandemic conditions? Background: In Sweden, where an extensive welfare state provides affordable child- and eldercare, the corona strategy of generational separation has still affected family practices of care between generations. In this article we analyse narratives of intergenerational care, taking our point of departure in theories of personal life (Smart 2007), relationality (Mason 2004), and care as sentient activity (Mason 1996). Method: The paper draws on a qualitative interview study with grandparents (n=30), adult children (n=12) and grandchildren (n=12), with data collection taking place shortly before and during the coronavirus pandemic. Results: The study detects the reciprocal and complex ways in which care between generations takes place. When people relate their experiences, strategies for new ways of doing care are at the centre, involving creative ways of negotiating distance and risk, all marked by both worry and relief. Conclusion: The pandemic condition becomes a 'filter' affecting and leading to a reformulation of practices of care, from taken-for-granted co-presence narratives, into narratives of relational participation resulting in an overall heightened awareness of the importance and difficulties of intergenerational care practices. The study concludes that a strong welfare state does not translate into complete autonomy or independence;rather, people continue to live 'linked lives'.

13.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1):365, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1817188

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused large disruptions to healthcare systems. Refocus on COVID-19 related care might have contributed to indirect effects on other healthcare areas. Care focused on acute conditions have been negatively affected although research into the effects on chronic and care intensive patient groups such as patients with dementia diseases is lacking. In this study we evaluated dementia diagnosis trends in Sweden during 2015-2020 according to International Classification of Disease version 10 coding of common dementia diseases. METHODS: Regional and national statistics in the form of International Classification of Disease version 10 coding, COVID-19 incidence, mortality data, and population census data were collected from the National Institute of Health and Welfare. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify trends of dementia diagnosis during 2015-2020. Correlation test was performed between COVID-19 incidence, mortality rates, and dementia coding. RESULTS: Dementia diagnosis incidence has been declining since 2015 and further decline was noted in many regions in Sweden during 2020. As COVID-19 incidence increased, fewer cases of dementia were diagnosed, a decrease that differentially impacted women and those who were advanced in age. CONCLUSIONS: Dementia diagnosis incidence in Sweden has been on a decline since 2015. The COVID-19 pandemic caused a further larger decline in dementia diagnosis incidence during 2020. COVID-19 incidence, but not mortality, was associated with decrease in dementia diagnosis incidence. There might be a large number of undiagnosed patients with dementia and healthcare reforms should be enacted to address this. Women and elderly are particularly vulnerable groups.

14.
CIRIEC - Espana ; - (104):303-331, 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1811194

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN: Es un hecho que ha crecido el número de personas mayores que viven solas y que los servicios sociales en la actualidad presentan muchas deficiencias, que se han evidenciado especialmente con el COVID-19. Estos hechos han convertido al cohousing senior en una atractiva alternativa de alojamiento para ellos. El avance del cohousing senior supone un empuje hacia la modernización de los alojamientos y servicios sociales para las personas mayores, en particular de las residencias. El cohousing senior lleva varios años de experiencia en otros países europeos, y representa una forma de convivir deseable entre los mayores y/o las familias que desean compañía y compartir tareas. Para conocer mejor la posible evolución futura del cohousing senior se introducen algunos apuntes del desarrollo de estos alojamientos en Suecia, un país modelo y guía en materia de políticas de viviendas y cuidados para personas mayores. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar el crecimiento de los alojamientos colaborativos para personas mayores en España desde la economía social, y conocer los problemas encontrados en su implementación, y las soluciones e impulsos políticos a su desarrollo. Hemos revisado la literatura española e internacional sobre cohousing senior durante la última década, y buscado datos en España sobre estos alojamientos en la prensa local y nacional y en la base de datos del proyecto MOVICOMA para determinar su grado de implantación y características. También se consultaron los barómetros de UDP sobre cohousing. Y hemos encontrado que su funcionamiento en España es incipiente, y que existen pocas iniciativas consolidadas, aunque bastantes en marcha, y se comprueba que la economía social juega un papel primordial. El Covid-19 ha elevado la demanda de estos alojamientos y alternativas de cuidado porque promueven y facilitan contactos sociales, evitan riesgos de las residencias, y mantienen a los participantes activos. Pero su implementación es lenta porque cuentan con importantes limitaciones a nivel de diseño, localización, financiación, burocracia excesiva y escaso apoyo público. Últimamente, a nivel político hay un mayor interés por estos alojamientos. Los planes de recuperación del Gobierno de España y algunas regulaciones de las CCAA y Ayuntamientos incorporan estrategias específicas sobre viviendas, otras para la Economía Social y cooperativas, y para el cuidado de los mayores (SAAD) que afectan directa o indirectamente al cohousing senior.Alternate :The advancement of senior cohousing is a push towards the modernization of housing and care for older people, and a challenge for present nursing homes. Cohousing has several years of experience in other European countries, and it is an attractive way of living for older people and/or families who want company and to share tasks. This article analyzes the growth of cohousing for older people in Spain from Third Sector, its barriers, and political impulses, and compares it with the experience in Sweden. Its functioning in Spain is incipient, and the Social Economy plays a key role. There are few consolidated initiatives, and quite a few underway, but the progress is slow due to numerous administrative and financial obstacles. The Covid-19 pandemic has raised the demand for these accommodations and care alternative because they promote and facilitate social contacts, some of the the risks of nursing homes, and comply with sustainable development objectives (SDG). Both Spain and Sweden have a variety of co-housing types, with a big role for cooperatives, but in Sweden they are primarily seen as a type of housing, where older people share fewer activities and maintain their privacy. Recently, there is greater political interest in cohousing. The recovery plans of the Spanish government and some regulations of the Autonomous Communities and City Councils incorporate specific strategies on housing, for the Third Sector, and the care of older people (SAAD) that affects senior cohousing.

15.
Physician Leadership Journal ; 9(2):20-25, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1801222

ABSTRACT

DESPITE DIFFERENCES IN TRAINING, TYPE OF healthcare organization, geography, and community demographics, physicians in every culture and country face similar challenges: providing quality, affordable healthcare;working within complex systems of policies and processes;managing people and resources;leveraging technology;and promoting efficiencies across their local healthcare system. Once I started working in the primary care and occupational medicine department, regarding the fitness, ability, and adjustments required at work along with the preventative measures like health promotion activities, health surveillance spurred my interest in the social and preventive aspects of medicine. Most of the Canadian universities that offer doctoral degrees also offer master's degree programs with an element of healthcare administration or public health focus. Just as medical curricula rely on structured learning combined with graded clinical responsibility, so should there be an emphasis on the integration of leadership training, in concert with exposure to increasingly senior physician leadership roles.

16.
Competitiveness Review ; 32(3):277-281, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1794944

ABSTRACT

[...]business strategies, ever more oriented to shared values (Porter and Kramer, 2019), must take into huge consideration structures, behaviours, resources and knowledge emerging from the economic, human, and territorial milieu (Festa et al., 2020). Highlighting its research interest on analysing, planning, implementing and controlling the generation of sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) through innovation, this special issue has asked for research that would have been constructed as business oriented, theoretically solid and practically usable, involving scientific papers adopting qualitative and quantitative methodologies, with a strong focus on competitive strategies for building innovation, sustainability and long-range competition. The results of this research confirm that strategic competitive innovation is a key source for financial performance of SMEs during such periods. [...]if SMEs are looking to grow and survive, they must be very dynamic and must implement a suitable innovation culture. Marketing innovation and process innovation have a positive and significant effect on the financial performance of SMEs, whereas organisational innovation and product innovation have no impact on the financial performance of SMEs. [...]it is deduced that the higher the support of SMEs to renewing marketing and processes practices, the more the levels of financial resistance and performance that are attained.

17.
Sustainability ; 13(6):3370, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1792502

ABSTRACT

The blind spot can be defined as the area around the vehicle where the driver cannot see through the mirrors without turning their head or taking their eyes off the road. Similar blind spots occur in energy policy. Blind spots can occur in forecasting economic development and creating policy documents. This study uncovers potential blind spots and controversies in the sustainability assessment of energy supply technologies. A composite sustainability index was constructed to compare district heating with four individual heating technologies—wood pellet boilers, natural gas boilers, solar collectors, and heat pumps. A total of 19 indicators were selected and grouped into four dimensions of sustainability—technical, environmental, economic, and social. The results reveal that district heating can compete with individual heating technologies in all dimensions of sustainability;however, a possible blind spot lies in evaluating environmental performance indicators of the different heating technologies. This study provides a novel decision-making tool that policy-makers could use to identify and avoid potential blind spots and uncertainties in energy policy at an early stage.

18.
Vaccines ; 10(4), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1792377

ABSTRACT

Media reports have caused a significant drop in confidence in the AstraZeneca ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 COVID-19 vector vaccine (Vaxzevria, AstraZeneca Södertälje, Sweden). This has caused many people, already vaccinated with the first dose of AstraZeneca, to refuse vaccination with this product. On the other hand, the increased demand for mRNA vaccines has resulted in a greater shortage of mRNA vaccines and cases of people being vaccinated with the AstraZeneca vaccine after the first dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine (Comirnaty, Pfizer/BioNTech, Mainz, Germany). Moreover, currently, 60.9% of the global population have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, while only 10% of people in low-income countries have received at least one dose. Even less people are fully vaccinated. The present pilot study evaluated the administration of half doses of AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines and included the enrollment of 26 subjects who were vaccinated with a different vaccine the first and second time. The reference group included individuals undergoing vaccination with two full doses of the Pfizer vaccine (21-day interval) monitored for their antibody levels as part of a parallel study. The distribution of antibody levels was not significantly different between those who received the Pfizer vaccine alone and those receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine plus Pfizer or Pfizer and AstraZeneca. To prepare for the next pandemic waves, solving the problem of the matching of booster vaccine to the previously received doses would be advisable. The topic is important and emerging as most of the population in low-income countries is still not vaccinated. We strongly believe that vaccine equity is the most important aspect of vaccination strategies.

19.
SSM - Qualitative Research in Health ; : 100082, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1783760

ABSTRACT

Several suggestions have been made as to why Sweden's approach to managing the COVID-19 pandemic came to rely on a strategy based on voluntary measures. Two of the most prominent explanations for why the country chose a different strategy than many other countries have focused on micro- and macro-level factors, explaining the strategy either in terms of the psychologies of prominent actors or by pointing to particularities in Swedish constitutional law. Supported by a qualitative analysis using interviews and text analysis, we argue that the Swedish strategy cannot be understood without paying attention to the meso-level and the organizations that produced the strategy. Moreover, we argue that to understand why one of the central organizations in Swedish pandemic management, the Public Health Agency, came to favor certain interventions, one must investigate the culture of production inside the organization and how it created precedents that led the Agency to approach pandemic management with a focus on balancing current and future health risks.

20.
Social Psychological Bulletin ; 15(4):1-26, 2020.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1766874

ABSTRACT

Prevailing research on individuals' compliance with public health related behaviours during the COVID-19 pandemic tends to study composite measures of multiple types of behaviours, without distinguishing between different types of behaviours. However, measures taken by governments involve adjustments concerning a range of different daily behaviours. In this study, we seek to explain students' public health related compliance behaviours during the COVID-19 pandemic by examining the underlying components of such behaviours. Subsequently, we investigate how these components relate to individual attitudes towards public health measures, descriptive norms among friends and family, and key demographics. We surveyed 7,403 university students in ten countries regarding these behaviours. Principal Components Analysis reveals that compliance related to hygiene (hand washing, coughing behaviours) is uniformly distinct from compliance related to social distancing behaviours. Regression analyses predicting Social Distancing and Hygiene lead to differences in explained variance and type of predictors. Our study shows that treating public health compliance as a sole construct obfuscates the dimensionality of compliance behaviours, which risks poorer prediction of individuals' compliance behaviours and problems in generating valid public health recommendations. Affecting these distinct behaviours may require different types of interventions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

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