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1.
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología ; 2022.
Article in Spanish | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1956323

ABSTRACT

Resumen Antecedentes: Los riesgos para la salud que enfrentan los adultos mayores son diversos;sin embargo, poco se ha explorado acerca del uso y abuso de sustancias psicoactivas en esta población. La reclusión impuesta por la situación que prevalece debido al SARS-Cov2 ha incrementado los sentimientos de soledad, aislamiento y tristeza asociados a esta edad, que los convierte en un factor de riesgo para el consumo de drogas. Objetivo: Analizar el consumo de drogas legales e ilegales en el personas mayores de 60 años usuarios de Facebook y su relación con síntomas de depresión durante la pandemia por SARS-Cov2. Material y métodos: Estudio realizado a 380 personas mayores, usuarios de Facebook, que respondieron un cuestionario publicado en línea, que indagó sobre: datos sociodemográficos, frecuencia y cantidad de consumo de drogas legales e ilegales y sintomatología depresiva. Resultados: 50.26% fueron mujeres;la edad promedio fue de 66.79 años (DS=5.81);31.05% consumieron alcohol en los últimos 30 días, 22.63% tabaco, tranquilizantes sin prescripción médica 16.05% y mariguana 7.89%. El consumo de otras drogas ilegales no superaron al 2.6% de la población. Al comparar entre consumidores y no consumidores, resultó que el consumo en los últimos 30 días fue ligeramente mayor en mujeres, en solteros y no se observaron diferencias en función del nivel de escolaridad. Los síntomas de depresión leve y grave se encontró asociada con todas las drogas a excepción de tabaco y opiáceos. Discusión y conclusiones: Los resultados obtenidos demuestran la necesidad de visibilizar el consumo de drogas entre los adultos mayores y de desarrollar estrategias que disminuyan las alteraciones anímicas que pueden estar experimentando, como el miedo, la angustia y la depresión. Background: The health risks faced by older adults are diverse;however, little has been explored about the use and abuse of psychoactive substances in this population. The seclusion imposed by the situation that prevails due to SARS-Cov2 has increased the feelings of loneliness, isolation and sadness associated with this age, which makes them a risk factor for drug use. Objective: To analyze the consumption of legal and illegal drugs in people over 60 years of age who are Facebook users and its relationship with symptoms of depression during the SARS-Cov2 pandemic. Material and methods: Study carried out on 380 elderly people, Facebook users, who answered a questionnaire published online, which inquired about: sociodemographic data, frequency and amount of legal and illegal drug use, and depressive symptomatology. Results: 50.26% were women;the average age was 66.79 years (SD=5.81);31.05% consumed alcohol in the last 30 days, 22.63% tobacco, tranquilizers without medical prescription 16.05% and marijuana 7.89%. The consumption of other illegal drugs did not exceed 2.6% of the population. When comparing between users and non-users, it turned out that consumption in the last 30 days was slightly higher in women, in single people and no differences were observed depending on the level of schooling. Mild and severe depressive symptoms were found to be associated with all drugs except tobacco and opiates. Discussion and conclusions: The results obtained demonstrate the need to make drug use visible among older adults and to develop strategies that reduce the mood disorders they may be experiencing, such as fear, anguish and depression. When comparing between users and non-users, it turned out that consumption in the last 30 days was slightly higher in women, in single people and no differences were observed depending on the level of schooling.

2.
Nutrients ; 14(15)2022 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957401

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite significant improvements in COVID-19 therapy, many patients still present with persistent symptoms and quality-of-life alterations. The aim of this study was to simultaneously investigate the long-term evolution of autonomy, malnutrition and long-lasting symptoms in people infected with COVID-19 and hospitalized in the ICU. METHOD: Patients' clinical characteristics; extent of their loss of autonomy based on "Autonomie Gérontologie Groupes Iso-Ressources" (AG-GIR) classification; nutritional status while following the French and Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) recommendations; and symptom evolutions before infection, during hospitalization and rehabilitation, and up to 6 months after returning home were determined in thirty-seven patients. RESULTS: Prior to a COVID-19 infection, all patients were autonomous, but upon admission to the rehabilitation center (CRM), 39% of them became highly dependent. After discharge from the center and 6 months after returning home, only 6 and 3%, respectively, still required considerable assistance. Of these thirty-seven patients, 11% were moderately malnourished and 81% presented with severe malnutrition, with a significant correlation being observed between malnutrition and autonomy (p < 0.05). Except for fatigue, which persisted in 70% of the patients 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation, all other symptoms decreased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a striking decrease in autonomy associated with malnutrition after hospitalization for a COVID-19 infection and a clear beneficial effect from personalized rehabilitation. However, although almost all patients regained autonomy 6 months after returning home, they often still suffer from fatigue. Patient compliance with their nutritional recommendations deserves further improvement, preferably through personalized and persistent follow-up with the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/complications , Humans , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Status
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957330

ABSTRACT

Persistent COVID-19 symptoms (long COVID) may bring challenges to long haulers' social lives. Females may endure more profound impacts given their special social roles and existing structural inequality. This study explores the effects of long COVID on the social life of female long haulers. We conducted semi-structured interviews via Zoom between April and June 2021 with 15 female long haulers in the United States, purposely recruited from Facebook and Slack groups and organization websites related to long COVID. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim with consent. The interview data were managed using MAXQDA and examined by thematic analysis. Long COVID negatively affected female long haulers' social lives by causing physical limitations, economic issues, altered social relationships, social roles' conflicts, and social stigma. Long COVID prevented female long haulers' recovery process. Physical limitations altered their perceptions on body, and family-work conflicts caused tremendous stress. They also experienced internalized stigma and job insecurities. This study provides insights into challenges that COVID-19 female long haulers could face in their return to normal social life, underscoring the vulnerability of females affected by long COVID due to significant alterations in their social lives. Shifting to new methods of communication, especially social media, diminished the adverse effects of long COVID (e.g., social isolation).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Qualitative Research , Social Stigma
4.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 882385, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957198

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses play an important role in medical and health services and insomnia symptoms were relatively high among nurses, especially during the epidemic of 2019 coronavirus disease. Insomnia not only damages the physical and mental health of the individual, but also reduces the efficiency of their work and the quality of care, ultimately impacting on patient care. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the role of perceived organizational support and psychological capital in the relationship between occupational stress and insomnia among Chinese nurses. Methods: A cross-sectional study has been carried out in a tertiary grade A hospital in Shandong Province, China from March 2021 to May 2021. The self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 810 nurses, which including Chinese Effort-Reward Imbalance Scale, Athens Insomnia Scale, Perceived Organizational Support Questionnaire, Chinese Psychological Capital Questionnaire, gender, age, education level and other demographic characteristics. Effective respondents were 658 (81.2%). Descriptive analysis, independent-samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson correlation analyses, ordinary least-squares regression and the bootstrap method were used for data analysis. Results: The prevalence of insomnia symptoms in this study was found to be 57.3%. There were significant differences in insomnia symptoms in weekly working hours (t = -2.027, P = 0.043), with chronic disease (t = -2.825, P = 0.005), negative life events (t = -5.340, P < 0.001), departments (F = 3.077, P = 0.006) and position (t = 2.322, P = 0.021) among nurses. Overall, the serial-multiple mediations of perceived organizational support and psychological capital in the relationship between occupational stress and insomnia were found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was comparatively high among Chinese nurses, and occupational stress had direct negative influence on it. Perceived organizational support and psychological capital acted as chained mediating factor could partially relieve insomnia symptoms related to occupational stress. Supportive working environment should be provided, and improving psychological capital levels to help nurses coping with insomnia symptoms.

5.
Digit Health ; 8: 20552076221109530, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957030

ABSTRACT

Vaccination for the COVID-19 pandemic has raised serious concerns among the public and various rumours are spread regarding the resulting illness, adverse reactions, and death. Such rumours can damage the campaign against the COVID-19 and should be dealt with accordingly. One prospective solution is to use machine learning-based models to predict the death risk for vaccinated people by utilizing the available data. This study focuses on the prognosis of three significant events including 'not survived', 'recovered', and 'not recovered' based on the adverse events followed by the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Extensive experiments are performed to analyse the efficacy of the proposed Extreme Regression- Voting Classifier model in comparison with machine learning models with Term Frequency-Inverse Document Frequency, Bag of Words, and Global Vectors, and deep learning models like Convolutional Neural Network, Long Short Term Memory, and Bidirectional Long Short Term Memory. Experiments are carried out on the original, as well as, a balanced dataset using Synthetic Minority Oversampling Approach. Results reveal that the proposed voting classifier in combination with TF-IDF outperforms with a 0.85 accuracy score on the SMOTE-balanced dataset. In line with this, the validation of the proposed voting classifier on binary classification shows state-of-the-art results with a 0.98 accuracy.

6.
J Affect Disord ; 314: 253-258, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depressed patients suffered from severe psychological distress even after the first COVID-19 outbreak was initially controlled. The longitudinal changes and associations among stress and other psychological problems during this period remained unknown. In this study we investigated stress symptoms and the longitudinal impact of stress symptoms on other psychological symptoms in depressed patients after the first COVID-19 outbreak was initially controlled. METHODS: A total of 5241 depressed patients at the outpatients of 56 hospitals across mainland China were recruited from May 18 to June 18, 2020. Five months later, 2113 of them responded again. Demographic characteristics were collected and psychological symptoms were evaluated at baseline and the follow-up. The longitudinal associations between stress symptoms at baseline and the changes of other psychological problems were assessed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and insomnia symptoms declined over time. Having stress symptoms at baseline was positively associated with the new occurrences of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and insomnia symptoms (range, adjusted RRs 1.69-1.81). LIMITATIONS: The sampling method and the high dropout rate are the major limitations. Additionally, the mental conditions of the participants were not obtained, which may lead to unavoidable bias. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of stress symptoms declined over time after the first COVID-19 outbreak was initially controlled. We found that having stress symptoms at baseline was a predictor for the new occurrences of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and insomnia symptoms.

7.
Int J Infect Dis ; 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956168

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify differences in the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients seen during the first and second waves of COVID-19 in the EsSalud-Lambayeque health care network, Peru. METHOD: Analytical cross-sectional study in 53,912 patients attended during the first and second waves of COVID-19. Cluster analysis based on Clustering Large Applications (CLARA) was applied to clinical-epidemiological data presented at the time of care. The two pandemic waves were compared using clinical-epidemiological data from epidemiological surveillance. RESULTS: Cluster analysis identified four COVID-19 groups with a characteristic pattern. Cluster 1 included the largest number of participants in both waves and was predominantly female. Cluster 2 included patients with gastrointestinal, respiratory, and systemic symptoms. Cluster 3 was the "severe" cluster, which was characterized by patients with dyspnea, older adults, and individuals with some comorbidity (cardiovascular, diabetes, obesity). Cluster 4 included asymptomatic, pregnant, and less severe patients. We found differences in all clinical-epidemiological characteristics according to the cluster to which they belonged. CONCLUSIONS: Using cluster analysis, we identified characteristic patterns among each group. Respiratory, gastrointestinal, dyspnea, anosmia, and ageusia symptoms were higher in the second than in the first COVID-19 wave.

8.
Heliyon ; : e10026, 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956155

ABSTRACT

Background: The proliferation of COVID-19 radically altered people's daily routines over the last two years, particularly among young. Closures of schools and colleges resulted in virtual learning that increased reliance on gadgets causing digital dependency among youth. The prevalence of digital amnesia, somatic symptoms and sleep disorders among youth during this pandemic require considerable attention since it has not been addressed widely. Methods: Cross-sectional study was carried out among 326 youth aged between 18 to 25 years. Digital Amnesia Scale, Somatic Symptom Disorder-B Criteria Scale (SSD-12) and Sleep disorders Symptom Checklist (SDS-CL-17) were used to collect data from participants. Results: Significant positive relationship was found between digital amnesia, somatic symptoms and sleep disorders among youth. Youth differed significantly in their somatic symptoms based on demographic variables such as gender, family type and area of residence. Digital amnesia had significant impact on somatic symptoms through the mediation effect of insomnia and circadian rhythm dimensions of sleep disorders. Conclusion: Productive use of digital devices would help youth reduce digital amnesia. Practicing digital break / digital detox could also help them improve their cognitive, affective and behavioural aspects, as well as their quality of sleep.

9.
Proceedings of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. Medical Sciences ; 66(1):77-89, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1955384

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The article provides a review and analysis of scientific works on the issue of professional burnout in healthcare workers. The two important indicators of the health organization’s efficiency are the prevention of professional burnout in healthcare workers and the quality of provided medical care. This review aims to analyze the available scientific information and summarize the data on preventive measures to prevent professional burnout in healthcare workers. Methods. The full-text articles published in the databases E-Library, CrossRef, PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were analyzed to systematize the data on measures aimed at preventing professional burnout in healthcare workers. Moreover, a couple of earlier publications of historical interest were analyzed as well. Results. The core symptoms and factors that trigger professional burnout in healthcare workers were analyzed, including doctors, dealing with the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and military physicians. Both its causes and consequences were determined. Professional burnout can be described as a combination of psychosomatic and somatic disorders, as well as symptoms of social dysfunction. Preventive measures against professional burnout have to cover a wide range of causes and include various treatment tools. Meanwhile, determining the exact causes of professional burnout in healthcare workers should become the top priority direction. Conclusion. Methodologically sound studies of professional burnout in healthcare workers should be financed. If the issue of professional burnout prevention is not resolved at the state level, it will jeopardize the sustainability of the entire healthcare system’s functioning © Petro Oliinyk, Viktor Chaplyk, Yevhen Timchenko, 2022

10.
Deterioro cognitivo en personas con COVID-19 con síntomas leves-moderados en Ecuador. ; 23(4):126-129, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1955374

ABSTRACT

Background: Complications of COVID-19 can include neurological, psychiatric, psychological, and psychosocial sequelae. Little is known about the consequences of COVID-19 on the cognitive functions of patients in the subacute phase of the disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine if there is an incidence of cognitive impairment in patients with COVID-19 with mild to moderate symptoms in the remission phase. Method: This is a cross-sectional study conducted between April 2021 and August 2021 at the Eugenio Espejo Hospital in Quito, Ecuador. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment test was applied to COVID-19 patients with mild to moderate symptoms. Results: A total of 50 subjects were recruited, 88% (n = 44) presented cognitive deterioration and only 12% (n = 6) showed a normal score. Conclusions: In our cohort study, patients with COVID-19 with mild-moderate symptoms are at high risk of cognitive impairment. (English) [ FROM AUTHOR] Antecedentes: Las complicaciones de COVID-19 pueden incluir secuelas neurológicas, psiquiátricas, psicológicas y psicosociales. Se sabe poco sobre las consecuencias del COVID-19 en las funciones cognitivas de los pacientes en la fase subaguda de la enfermedad. Objetivo: Determinar si existe incidencia de deterioro cognitivo en pacientes con COVID-19 con síntomas leves a moderados en la fase de remisión. Método: Se trata de un estudio de tipo transversal realizado entre abril de 2021 y agosto de 2021 en el Hospital Eugenio Espejo de Quito, Ecuador. Se aplicó el MoCA test a los pacientes con COVID-19 con síntomas de leve a moderado. Resultados: Un total de 50 sujetos fueron reclutados, el 88% (n = 44) presentó deterioro cognitivo y apenas el 12% (n = 6) evidenció una puntuación normal. Conclusiones: En nuestro estudio de cohorte los pacientes con COVID-19 con sintomatología leve-moderada tienen un alto riesgo de presentar deterioro cognitivo. (Spanish) [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Revista Mexicana de Neurociencia is the property of Academia Mexicana de Neurologia and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

11.
Nursing Children & Young People ; 34(4):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1954771

ABSTRACT

There has been a rise in the number of cases of sudden-onset hepatitis in children since January. According to an update on a technical briefing from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) in April, there have been 145 cases of acute non-A-E hepatitis identified in children aged under 16, as of 29 April.

12.
Pteridines ; 33(1):11-20, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1951638

ABSTRACT

Background The authors explore the therapeutic and prophylactic efficacies of Immunopterin (calcium pterin-6-carboxylate chelate) against coronavirus colds and as a therapy against COVID-19. Methods To determine Immunopterin’s therapeutic efficacy against colds and flus, a 5-year observational study was conducted with 34 subjects who took Immunopterin when feeling symptoms of a cold or flu. The mean sample cold recovery time was compared to the US population mean. A review of the Moheno (2014) 2-year observational study was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of Immunopterin against colds. Early COVID-19 case studies, treated with Immunopterin, were collected to explore Immunopterin’s efficacy as a therapeutic and prophylactic against COVID19 disease. Results The mean cold recovery time for the therapeutic sample in the cold/flu observational study was 30 h compared to the US population mean of 168 h (N = 34;p < 0.001). Subjects taking prophylactic Immunopterin reported 0% incidences of colds and flus (N = 31). Immunopterin successfully treated four confirmed COVID-19 subjects. A fifth clinical nurse case study demonstrates COVID-19 prevention. Conclusions The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacies of Immunopterin against coronavirus colds, along with reported cross-reactivity between coronavirus colds and SARS-CoV-2 strongly suggest Immunopterin can act as a therapy and preventative against COVID- 19 infection associated disease.

13.
Ann Ig ; 34(5): 478-489, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954748

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The severe acute respiratory syndrome (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 was first reported in China in December 2019 and has generated a worldwide pandemic. The objective of the research is to examine and describe (a) the symptoms that persist after the end of the acute stage and (b) their relationship with the severity of the disease. Study Design: This study is a cross-sectional study conducted in the Kingdom of Bahrain on COVID-19 infected patients using an online survey questionnaire with a total number of 52 patient responses (29 females and 23 males). Method: A scale (0 no symptoms to 10 very high symptoms intensity) was assessed in patients after 3 months to detect the relevance of specific symptoms post-COVID-19 such as emotional and physical health, headache, dyspnoea, pain (muscles/joints/chest), anosmia, vertigo, neurologic symptoms, sarcopenia, delirium. Results: The most common COVID-19 symptoms were reported to be fever (69.2%), headache (59.6%), and cough (50.0%). Data analysis showed that BMI was not correlated with any post-acute COVID-19 symptoms. Regarding the post-acute COVID-19 symptoms, this study showed that an increase of intensity of headache was associated with an increase of delirium; an increase of intensity of dyspnoea was associated with an increase of pulmonary dysfunction. The increase of anosmia and dysgeusia was associated with an increase in delirium. In addition, the increase of neurological symptoms and delirium were associated with the increase of sarcopenia. The most common persistent post-COVID-19 symptoms observed in this study were emotional stress, followed by loss of smell and taste, and neurological symptoms. Conclusions: Therefore, follow-up and rehabilitation care for COVID-19 patients must be focused on addressing the needs of these people in the longer term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Sarcopenia , Anosmia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Children (Basel) ; 9(5)2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1953078

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home-quarantine due to COVID-19 may have negative psychological effects on vulnerable sub-groups such as children and adolescents. We aimed to explore the prevalence of anxiety among adolescents who were in home-quarantine and its impact on onset of sleep disturbance and somatic symptoms, and on the level of agreement between adolescent and parent perceptions. METHODS: Five hundred adolescents (ages 10-17) and 500 parents participated in the study. Adolescents filled out PROMIS Anxiety, PROMIS Sleep Disturbance, and PHQ-15 Physical-Symptom forms, while their parents completed proxy questionnaires containing the same domains. RESULTS: 38% of the adolescents reported experiencing anxiety during home-quarantine period, 29% suffered from sleep disturbance, and 48% reported somatic symptoms. Addition of one day in home-quarantine was significantly associated with sleep disturbance (OR = 3.78, 95%CI: 1.09-8.45) and somatic symptoms (OR = 1.80, 95%CI: 1.01-3.08); female gender was associated with increased risk for somatic symptoms (OR = 2.15, 95%CI: 1.07-4.55); poor agreement in levels of anxiety, sleep disturbance and somatic symptoms was found between adolescent and parent reports (ICCs of 0.197-0.262). DISCUSSION: Total isolation from household members during home-quarantine may cause anxiety, sleep disturbance, and somatization among adolescents. Achieving the appropriate balance between infection control and mitigation of the potential adverse psychological effect of home-quarantine among children and adolescents should be immediate priorities for policymakers.

15.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604552, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952907

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The global impact of COVID-19 driven by new variants may add to the negative mental health consequences of the prolonged pandemic, including posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). University students may be prone to develop a series of PTSS due to life plan disruptions as well as increased uncertainty caused by the pandemic. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations between pandemic fatigue, anxiety sensitivity (AS), and PTSS among university students in South Korea. Methods: Using convenience sampling, 400 students participated in this cross-sectional online survey. Descriptive statistics and linear mixed models were used to examine factors associated with PTSS. Results: About one-third (32.3%) of the participants reported clinically significant levels of PTSS. Multivariate analyses revealed that pandemic fatigue (ß = 0.124, p < 0.001) and AS (ß = 0.212, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with PTSS while controlling for other study variables. Conclusion: Young adults who feel more fatigue related to the COVID-19 pandemic and with high AS should be given access to mental health resources to better manage their mental health and reduce PTSS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Students , Universities , Young Adult
16.
Front Public Health ; 10: 840292, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952778

ABSTRACT

Introduction: For young adults, the first year of higher education represents a transition period into adulthood associated with an increased risk of developing depression, anxiety, and stress, contributing to deteriorating physical and mental health. The present study aimed to analyze the relationship between depressive symptoms and social capital and lifestyles among Colombian university students. Methods: In 2020, a longitudinal repeated measures study was conducted on first year students at Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, Colombia. The study was conceptualized and approved by the university before the COVID-19 pandemic appeared. Each student completed a self-administered questionnaire including questions on sociodemographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, social capital, and lifestyles. The study's pilot was conducted in November 2019, and the two measurement points were in January 2020 (wave 1, before the COVID-19 pandemic was declared) and in August 2020 (wave 2, during the COVID-19 pandemic). A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between depressive symptoms, perceived stress, social capital, and lifestyles. Findings: A total of 609 first year students (response rate = 58.11%) participated in wave 1, and 42% of the participants showed signs of clinically relevant depressive symptoms. In wave 2, despite the difficulties encountered in collecting data due to the COVID-19 pandemic, 216 students from wave 1 participated (35.47%). An increase in a sedentary lifestyle was observed (31.49%). We found that cognitive and behavioral social capital levels decreased by 12.03 and 24.54%, respectively. In addition, we observed a 6.5% increase in students with clinically relevant depressive symptoms compared to wave 1. A low level of behavioral [OR: 1.88; 95% CI (1.16, 3.04)] social capital was associated with clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Conclusion: The health of university students continues to be a public health concern. The study suggests that social capital may play an important role in preventing depressive symptoms. Therefore, universities should put effort into programs that bring students together and promote the creation of social capital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Capital , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colombia/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Life Style , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students/psychology , Universities , Young Adult
17.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 877595, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952738

ABSTRACT

Background: People with dementia (PWD) are vulnerable to abrupt changes to daily routines. The lockdown enforced on the 23rd of March 2020 in the UK to contain the expansion of the COVID-19 pandemic limited opportunities for PWD to access healthcare services and socialise. The SOLITUDE study explored the potential long-term effects of lockdown on PWD's symptoms and carers' burden. Methods: Forty-five carers and 36 PWD completed a telephone-based assessment at recruitment (T0) and after 3 (T1) and 6 months (T2). PWD completed measures validated for telephonic evaluations of cognition and depression. Carers completed questionnaires on their burden and on PWD's health and answered a customised interview on symptom changes observed in the initial months of lockdown. Longitudinal changes were investigated for all outcome variables with repeated-measures models. Additional post hoc multiple regression analyses were carried out to investigate whether several objective factors (i.e., demographics and time under social restrictions) and carer-reported symptom changes observed following lockdown before T0 were associated with all outcomes at T0. Results: No significant changes were observed in any outcomes over the 6 months of observations. However, post hoc analyses showed that the length of social isolation before T0 was negatively correlated with episodic and semantic memory performance at T0. Carers reporting worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms and faster disease progression in PWD also reported higher burden. Moreover, carer-reported worsening of cognitive symptoms was associated with poorer semantic memory at T0. Conclusion: PWD's symptoms and carers' burden remained stable over 6 months of observation. However, the amount of time spent under social restrictions before T0 appears to have had a significant detrimental impact on cognitive performance of patients. In fact, carer-reported cognitive decline during social isolation was consistent with the finding of poorer semantic memory, a domain sensitive to progression in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the initial stricter period of social isolation had greater detrimental impact on patients and their carers, followed then by a plateau. Future interventions may be designed to maintain an optimal level of social and cognitive engagement for PWD in challenging times, to prevent abrupt worsening of symptoms and associated detrimental consequences on patients' carers.

18.
Front Nutr ; 9: 873162, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952476

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: Magnesium is an anti-inflammatory mineral that plays a role in the innate immune system, and the relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle warrants additional attention in COVID-19. This study examined the association between magnesium intake and COVID-19 severity and related symptoms in hospitalized patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done enrolling 250 COVID-19 patients aged 18 to 65 years. A validated 168-item online food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to assess dietary magnesium intake. COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines were used to determine COVID-19 severity, and symptoms were evaluated using a standard questionnaire. Crude and adjusted analyses were performed (Model 1: age, sex, and energy intake; Model 2: Model 1 + physical activity, supplements, corticosteroids, and antiviral drugs; Model 3: Model 2 + body mass index). Results: The mean age of participants was 44.1 ± 12.1 years, and 46% of them had severe COVID-19. Patients at the highest tertile of dietary magnesium intake had lower serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers, including CRP (11.8 ± 2.2 vs. 29.5 ± 2.1 mg/L, p < 0.001) and ESR (15.8 ± 2.4 vs. 34.7 ± 2.4 mm/hr, p < 0.001), than those at the lowest tertile. After controlling for potential confounders, we observed that a higher dietary magnesium intake was associated with a lower odds of severe COVID-19 (OR: 0.32; 95% CI: 0.15-0.70). Also, we found a significant inverse association between dietary magnesium intake and odds of COVID-19 symptoms. Conclusion: We found that higher intake of dietary magnesium was inversely associated with COVID-19 severity and symptoms.

19.
Egypt J Intern Med ; 34(1): 45, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951431

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is commonly associated with respiratory symptoms. However, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are increasingly recognized in COVID-19 patients. The aim is to study the prevalence and features of gastrointestinal manifestations in severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected patients and evaluate the outcome among the studied population. Results: We enrolled adult patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 admitted to Ain Shams University designated hospitals, Cairo, Egypt, from March 2021 to June 2021. The patients were assigned to a GI group and a non-GI group based on the presence or absence of one or more digestive symptoms. A total of 300 hospitalized COVID-19 patients were included, of which 104 (34.7%) had one or more digestive symptoms. They were compared with 196 COVID-19 patients without GI symptoms. The most common reported GI symptom was diarrhea (82.7%). GI symptoms' presence was higher in moderate cases. Patients with digestive symptoms presented for care later than those without (7.9±3.8 vs 7.4±7.2 days, P=0.5). Moreover, they have lower mortality, though non-significant (7.7 vs 12.8%, P=0.18). Patients with digestive symptoms had lower total leucocytic count (TLC), neutrophil count, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet count, and higher serum sodium than those without digestive symptoms. Conclusion: GI symptoms are prevalent among COVID-19 patients, and the most common was diarrhea. The presence of GI manifestations was not associated with increased mortality.

20.
Journal of Mathematics ; 2022, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1950364

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently threatening the entire world, and a novel coronavirus is a virus from the corona family that has spread a new infection. The number of instances of this disease is increasing at an exponential, but there are now commercially accessible COVID-19 vaccines. The weak symptoms of COVID-19 disease, on the other hand, are treated with a variety of antiviral treatments. It is still choosing the optimal antiviral medicine to manage COVID-19s. It is a challenging and difficult alternative to reduce the risk of infection. In this study, an improved combined compromise solution (CoCoSo) method is proposed to identify the ranking of alternatives. The introduction of a logarithmic picture fuzzy set is a more effective technique for representing variance, represented by three memberships (positive, neutral, and negative membership) degrees. This work introduces a fresh logarithmic picture fuzzy score function, to deal with the problem of comparison. The CoCoSo method-based logarithmic picture fuzzy decision-making algorithm is given. To achieve so, a new divergence measure for the logarithmic picture fuzzy number is introduced. To demonstrate the viability and efficacy of the established approach in real-world applications, a case study of COVID-19 disease drug selection is discussed.

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