Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 32
Filter
1.
J Med Biochem ; 41(4): 491-496, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067124

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 may affect many endocrine tissues as well as thyroid gland and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. It has been shown that COV D-19 infection suppresses thyroid hormones in some studies and causes subacute thyroiditis in the others so that its effects are still not fully known. The aim of our study is to retrospectively evaluate thyroid functions, clinical findings, biochemical and inflammatory markers in PCR positive patients infected with COVID-19; and to evaluate the relationship between abnormal thyroid function tests (TFT) and clinical and laboratory findings and whether it has potential prognostic significance. Methods: The data of patients aged 18 years and older, 201 patients who applied to Mersin City Training and Research Hospital due to COVID-19 infection between 1st of March and 1st of April in 2021 and received inpatient treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Large TFT (TSH, T3, T4, anti-TPO) and laboratory data of 201 patients with mild, moderate or severe pneumonia on CT were scanned retrospectively. 121 (60.2%) of the patients were male, mean age was 51.9 ± 14.6 years, and the most common comorbid disease was hypertension in 65 (32.3%) patients. Conclusions: It has been determined that the deterioration in TFTs is associated with LDH and D-dimer which are indicators of cell and endothelial damage, duration of hospitalization, clinical severity, and having mutant strains and it has been concluded that low TSH can be used as a prognostic indicator in COVID-19 patients. Further studies with healthy control groups, quantitative RT-PCR tests, histological and pathological correlations, and long-term follow-up are needed.

2.
Chest ; 162(4):A2565-A2566, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060965

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Rare Pulmonary Infections SESSION TYPE: Rapid Fire Case Reports PRESENTED ON: 10/18/2022 01:35 pm - 02:35 pm INTRODUCTION: Aspergillus is a group of opportunistic endemic fungal species that causes pathology within the respiratory tract and sinuses of individuals with predisposing factors, such as immunosuppression. While less frequently discussed, aspergillosis thyroiditis represents the most common fungal thyroiditis. We present a case of this condition that was misdiagnosed as amiodarone induced thyrotoxicosis. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old male was evaluated in outpatient pulmonary clinic after a chest CT revealed new upper lobe mass-like pleural based infiltrates with accompanying symptoms of dyspnea on exertion and fevers. His medical history was significant for orthotopic heart transplant 6 months ago due to a combination of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy with further decompensation from COVID-19 infection. After transplant, he was diagnosed with thyrotoxicosis secondary to amiodarone that was being treated with prednisone and methimazole. Given the concern for infection on imaging, he was admitted to the hospital and underwent urgent bronchoscopic evaluation. During the procedure, he was noted to have severe extrinsic tracheal compression. His neck imaging was consistent with a nodular goiter. The BAL revealed Aspergillosis fumigatus and he was subsequently treated with isavuconazium. Given the compression on the trachea and persistent dyspnea, the decision was to pursue total thyroidectomy. Surgery occurred 2 months after treatment was initiated for the Aspergillosis and with improvement on serial chest CTs. Pathologic examination of the thyroid tissue revealed extensive invasive aspergillus with abscesses involving both lobes. DISCUSSION: Aspergillus infection leading to disseminated disease typically occurs in individuals that have a compromised immune system such as seen in malignancy, solid organ transplant, chronic steroid use, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Recently, it has been cited that up to 15% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients requiring intensive care develop aspergillus infection. After initial aspergillosis infection has been established, the thyroid gland is a site for dissemination due to its rich vascular supply. In addition, due to the angioinvasive properties of the pathogen, the fungus can breakdown tissue planes and easily travel from its site of origin. Thereby a primary infection in the respiratory tract can lead to dissemination to the neck structures due to its proximity. When thyroid invasion occurs, the common complaints are neck pain and swelling. Thyroid laboratory findings encompass the full spectrum including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and euthyroid. Given these non-specific findings, clinicians need to be conscious of this disease entity. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with immunocompromising conditions, findings of neck pain, swelling, and abnormal thyroid laboratory values should broaden the differential for clinicians to include aspergillosis thyroiditis. Reference #1: Alvi, Madiha M et al. "Aspergillus thyroiditis: a complication of respiratory tract infection in an immunocompromised patient.” Case reports in endocrinology vol. 2013 (2013): 741041. doi:10.1155/2013/741041 Reference #2: Marui, Suemi, et al. "Suppurative thyroiditis due to aspergillosis: a case report.” Journal of Medical Case Reports 8.1 (2014): 1-3. Reference #3: Kuehn, Bridget M. "Aspergillosis Is Common Among COVID-19 Patients in the ICU.” JAMA 326.16 (2021): 1573-1573. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by A. Whitney Brown, value=Honoraria Removed 04/03/2022 by A. Whitney Brown No relevant relationships by A. Whitney Brown, value=Honoraria Removed 04/03/2022 by A. Whitney Brown No relevant relationships by A. Whitney Brown, value=Consulting fee Removed 04/03/2022 by A. Whitney Brown No relevant relationships by Kristen Bussa Advisory Committee Member relationship with Boehringer Ingelheim Please note: 2019-2021 Added 04/03/2022 by Christopher King, value=Consulting f e Advisory Committee Member relationship with Actelion Please note: 2019-2022 Added 04/03/2022 by Christopher King, value=Consulting fee Advisory Committee Member relationship with United Therapeutics Please note: 2019-2022 Added 04/03/2022 by Christopher King, value=Consulting fee Speaker/Speaker's Bureau relationship with Actelion Please note: 2019-2022 Added 04/03/2022 by Christopher King, value=Consulting fee Speaker/Speaker's Bureau relationship with United Therapeutics Please note: 2020-22 Added 04/03/2022 by Christopher King, value=Consulting fee No relevant relationships by Haresh Mani No relevant relationships by Mary Beth Maydosz No relevant relationships by Alan Nyquist No relevant relationships by Anju Singhal No relevant relationships by Amy Thatcher

3.
J Klin Endokrinol Stoffwechs ; 15(3): 100-104, 2022.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007343

ABSTRACT

There are several interactions between a SARS-CoV­2 infection and the thyroid, bidirectionally in both directions. In severe COVID-19 infection, changes in thyroid hormone levels are a marker for poorer prognosis. SARS-CoV­2 appears to interact directly with thyrocytes as well as modulate the immune system and trigger autoimmune thyroid disease. As early as 2020, SARS-CoV­2 associated thyroiditis was described in patients with COVID-19, which is similar to subacute thyroiditis but typically painless. There are now a wide variety of reports on the occurrence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves' disease following both viral infection and vaccination. Existing thyroid disease does not appear to be associated with either a higher risk of SARS-CoV­2 infection or a more severe disease course. The present paper summarizes the current knowledge regarding the thyroid gland and SARS-CoV­2.

4.
Pathophysiology ; 29(3): 486-494, 2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2006152

ABSTRACT

Molecular mimicry between human and microbial/viral/parasite peptides is common and has long been associated with the etiology of autoimmune disorders provoked by exogenous pathogens. A growing body of evidence accumulated in recent years suggests a strong correlation between SARS-CoV-2 infection and autoimmunity. The article analyzes the immunogenic potential of the peptides shared between the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (S-protein) and antigens of human endocrinocytes involved in most common autoimmune endocrinopathies. A total of 14 pentapeptides shared by the SARS-CoV-2 S-protein, thyroid, pituitary, adrenal cortex autoantigens and beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans were identified, all of them belong to the immunoreactive epitopes of SARS-CoV-2. The discussion of the findings relates the results to the clinical correlates of COVID-19-associated autoimmune endocrinopathies. The most common of these illnesses is an autoimmune thyroid disease, so the majority of shared pentapeptides belong to the marker autoantigens of this disease. The most important in pathogenesis of severe COVID-19, according to the authors, may be autoimmunity against adrenals because their adequate response prevents excessive systemic action of the inflammatory mediators causing cytokine storm and hemodynamic shock. A critique of the antigenic mimicry concept is given with an assertion that peptide sharing is not a guarantee but only a prerequisite for provoking autoimmunity based on the molecular mimicry. The latter event occurs in carriers of certain HLA haplotypes and when a shared peptide is only used in antigen processing.

5.
Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab ; 17(4): 365-374, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997014

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Normal thyroid status throughout pregnancy is important for both maternal and fetal health. Despite the bulk of contemporary research honing on thyroid function in gestation and the relevant disorders, there are still gaps in our current knowledge about the etiology and treatment of thyroid diseases in pregnant women. AREAS COVERED: This article analyzes the adaptation of the thyroid gland to gestational physiological changes and attempts to explain the effect of several factors on thyroid function in pregnancy. It also stresses proper utilization and interpretation of thyroid tests during pregnancy and underlines the significance of proper screening and treatment of pregnant women aiming at favorable health outcomes. EXPERT OPINION: Appropriate strategies for diagnosing and treating thyroid disease in pregnancy are important. Laboratory thyroid testing plays a leading role, but test results should be interpreted with caution. Given the possible serious maternal and fetal/neonatal complications of thyroid disease in pregnancy, we recommend universal screening with TSH measurements of all pregnant women. Additional assessment with determination of the levels of free thyroid hormones and thyroid antibodies may be necessary under certain conditions. The economic burden of such interventions should be considered.


Subject(s)
Pregnancy Complications , Thyroid Diseases , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnant Women , Thyroid Diseases/diagnosis , Thyroid Function Tests
6.
Applied Sciences ; 12(15):7552, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1993922

ABSTRACT

Molecular profiling has revolutionized the treatment of metastatic NSCLC. Uncommon mutations have been reported primarily in EGFR and BRAF genes and are frequently associated with atypical clinical presentations. Here, we present a rare case of a patient affected by BRAF exon 15 p.K601E-mutated lung cancer with synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. First line treatment with chemo-immunotherapy combinations provided a PFS of 8–9 months, whereas a second line treatment with BRAF and MEK inhibitors elicited a dissociated response. The latter clinical outcome suggests that these inhibitors have only partial activity against this rare mutation.

7.
Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology ; 48:S44, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1984183

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Subacute thyroiditis is a self-limited inflammatory thyroid disease, following or coexisting with a viral infection. COVID-19 has numerous multi-systemic effects, including thyroid disorders. Possible mechanisms involved in thyroid dysfunction associated with COVID-19 infection include apoptosis, inflammatory reaction and follicular cells damage;direct effect of the virus (SARS-CoV-2 genomes were found in patients serum);the interaction with thyroid angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, respectively Materials: In the period of November 2021-February 2022, five patients with subacute thyroiditis associated with COVID-19 were evaluated in our department (4 women, one man);mean age 42.1±11.3 years. The mean time between COVID-19 infection and onset of subacute thyroiditis was 23±10.2 days. Results: The most common symptoms presented by the affected patients were represented by fever, painful thyroid, and thyrotoxicosis associated complaints. All the patients presented severe inflammatory syndrome, but the thyrotoxicosis clinical and biochemical picture was more severe as compared to other viral subacute thyroiditis. In 60% of the cases, 2D-ultrasonography was suggestive for subacute thyroiditis, but Share-Wave Elastography (SWE) parameters confirmed the diagnostic in 100% of cases (mean thyroid stiffness 234.2±34.5 kPa). Under steroid therapy, during follow-up, the thyroid stiffness decreased gradually at 4 weeks (65.9±15.4 kPa), respectively at 10 weeks (21.6±5.3 kPa). The clinical outcome was favorable in all cases. Two patients developed hypothyroidism and were treated accordingly. Discussions: Subacute thyroiditis are characterized by significantly increased thyroid stiffness. The results of this study documented a significant difference in thyroid tissue stiffness between SAT at baseline and values recorded at the follow-up visit. It is noteworthy that changes in the elastic properties of thyroid parenchyma were associated with a gradual normalization of biochemical parameters Conclusions: Early diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis associated with COVID-19 is crucial, as prompt treatment with glucocorticoids leads to complete resolution of the disease. Sonoelastography SWE is useful in the positive diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis

8.
Pharmazeutische Zeitung ; 167(15):44-47, 2022.
Article in German | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1980273
9.
Siberian Journal of Oncology ; 21(3):168-173, 2022.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1979824

ABSTRACT

Background. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic of the new millennium. COVID-19 can cause both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and can rapidly progress to multiple organ failure. Data on the relationship between COVID-19 and the thyroid gland have been available since March 2020. The thyroid gland and viral infection as well as associated inflammatory-immune reactions participate in a complex interaction. The most common autoimmune disease is chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto thyroiditis). The majority of medullary thyroid cancers present as a thyroid nodule. Cervical lymph nodes and distant metastases are often detected at the time of diagnosis. The development of autoantibodies may be part of a more complex protective antitumor mechanism, the purpose of which is to eliminate the precursors of future tumor cells. The purpose of the study was to describe a clinical case of diagnosing medullary thyroid cancer in the patient who had COVID-19. Case description. We present the case of a 43-year-old woman who had coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19), which was accompanied by an increase in serum procalcitonin (PC) level, which required additional examination. Since 2020, she had been observed for autoimmune thyroiditis, which was manifested by a thyroid nodular of a small size. After discharge from the COVID hospital, an ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland revealed an increase in the left lobe thyroid nodule up to 15 mm. The level of calcitonin was 681 pg/ml. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the thyroid gland showed suspicion for medullary thyroid cancer. Thyroidectomy with central lymph node dissection (level VI) was performed. A planned histological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed medullary thyroid cancer. Conclusion. In the present clinical case, medullary thyroid cancer was detected in the patient who had COVID-19 with elevated PC level, which was the basis for a diagnostic search.

10.
Diabetes ; 71, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1952110

ABSTRACT

Recent reports suggest a potential relationship between COVID-and onset of diabetes (DM) . We present the case of a 35 yr old female with type 1 DM (T1DM) who following COVID-pneumonia (COVP) developed worsening insulitis suggesting a potential direct effect of COVID-on beta cell function. The patient is a 35 yr old Caucasian female with T1DM first diagnosed 5 yrs ago. She had some residual beta cell secretory function with fasting C-peptide;0.51 (0-8-3.85ng/ml) . She also has hemochromatosis, thyroiditis with thyroid nodular disease and +ve history of T1DM in her older brother and maternal cousin. Since diagnosis she has been on insulin pump therapy and a CGMS device with excellent glycemic control and HBA1c of 6.7-7.1. She had not received the COVID-vaccine and had COVP in July 2021 requiring inpatient care but not intubation. She received oral steroids and Remdesivir with salutary response. She has not had post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV (PASC) but ˜ 2 months post discharge had acute thyroiditis with no thyroid abscess, elevated sed rate, leucocytosis and peak thyroglobulin;158 (3-40ng/ml) . Since discharge she noted persistent global hyperglycemia requiring increased basal and bolus insulin therapy with peak HBA1c of 8.3. Further evaluation showed active insulitis with reduced C-peptide 0.and increase in islet related antibodies compared to titers obtained at the time of initial diagnosis 5 yrs prior. The clinical presentation of our patient suggests a potential role of COVID-in inducing insulitis with significant implications for at risk patients including T1DM patients with preserved islet function but also type 2 DM and LADA patients. This case provides another compelling reason for advocating COVID-vaccination in at risk patients. The duration of this effect on islet function and whether beta cell functional recovery is possible over time remains to be seen. The insulitis manifests with worsening glycemic profiles as well as possibly impacting islet mediated counterregulatory glycemic responses.

12.
Iranian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism ; 23(3), 2021.
Article in Persian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1897985

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a type of coronavirus that causes COVID-19 disease. The virus can infect various organs by triggering hormones, regulatory and messenger molecules, and immune-inflammatory responses. Given the vital role of thyroid in metabolism, it is important to understand the potential effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the thyroid gland. In this article, reports and studies examining the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on thyroid are reviewed, and possible effects of this virus on thyroid function are discussed. According to the available evidence, SARS-CoV-2 can adversely impact thyroid function directly by affecting the pituitary-thyroid axis or indirectly by triggering immune-inflammatory responses. COVID-19-dependent thyroid disorders have been biochemically observed in three forms: hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis, and nonthyroidal illness syndrome. Subacute thyroiditis has been one of the most common clinical conditions of SARS-CoV-2-dependent thyrotoxicosis. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 may cause recurrence of improved thyroid diseases or exacerbate current diseases. There is no evidence that thyroid disease, including thyroid cancer, increases the risk of COVID-19 or exacerbates its complications. According to current studies, COVID-19 medications, including glucocorticoids and anticoagulants, have no adverse effects on thyroid function in non-acute COVID-19 patients. Further studies are needed to investigate the interactions between SARS-CoV-2 infection and thyroid function.

13.
Revista Espanola de Salud Publica ; 94(e202012176), 2020.
Article in Spanish | GIM | ID: covidwho-1871767

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this paper was to describe the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) by the Neonatal Screening Program in the Autonomous Community of Madrid during the state of alarm due to the COVID-19 health crisis.

14.
Endocrine ; 76(3): 635-641, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872731

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Data about the effects of COVID-19 on the endocrine system are increasing over time. In the present study, we investigated the effects of COVID-19 on the thyroid gland among COVID-19 survivors by comparing them with healthy subjects. METHODS: Adult COVID-19 survivors who were managed and followed up in the Infectious Disease clinic were asked to participate in this study. COVID-19 survivors were recruited via a convenience sampling and those who agreed to participate in this study were seen by endocrinologists for assessments. The blood tests were obtained for thyroid antibodies and thyroid function tests. Thyroid ultrasonography (USG) was done by the same physician. The ellipsoid formula was used for the calculation of thyroid gland volume. RESULTS: 64 adult COVID-19 survivors and 70 control subjects were enrolled in the study. The COVID-19 survivors were evaluated at median 5.7 months (IQR: 4-6.5) (range: 2-7 months) after acute infection. The mean thyroid gland volume was significantly lower in COVID-19 survivors (10.3 ± 3.4 mL) than in the controls (14 ± 5.3 mL) (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels between the groups. Among the twelve patients who had thyroid function evaluated in acute COVID-19, fT3 values were lower in acute COVID-19 than at the time of USG evaluation (3.04 ± 0.41 vs 3.47 ± 0.31 pg/mL), (p = 0.02). Among COVID-19 survivors, mild TSH elevation was detected in 4 (6.2%) patients and all of the other COVID-19 survivors (93.7%) were euthyroid. CONCLUSIONS: At 6 months after acute COVID, COVID-19 survivors had smaller thyroid gland volume than healthy controls, and only a few of the COVID-19 survivors had abnormal thyroid function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors , Thyroid Function Tests , Thyroid Gland/diagnostic imaging , Thyrotropin , Thyroxine , Triiodothyronine
15.
Health Science Reports ; 5(3), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1857737

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may have a direct effect on several endocrine glands, including the thyroid. 1 SARS-CoV-2 enters cells using the angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) receptor, expressed by the thyroid. 2 Prior literature reported low levels of triiodothyronine (TT3) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in adult patients with COVID-19. 3 However, levels of TSH in children during the pandemic are unknown. Wang et al., evaluated thyroid function in 96 hospitalized adults with COVID-19 3;levels of TSH were significantly lower than those of healthy controls. 3 Levels of TSH increased gradually within 2 months after hospitalization. 3 Similarly, Chen et al. reported TSH levels lower than the normal range in 28 of 50 (56%) adult patients with COVID-19. 5 It is unknown what caused the observed pattern and/or how significant it was. TSH levels may also differ according to ethnicity and race;discrepancies may exist between Asian, White, Black, and Hispanics. [...]this finding may only reflect one specific community representation, and may not apply to non-White children.

16.
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils ; 8(4):15615-15618, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1812706

ABSTRACT

Relevance: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age. The prevalence rates of PCOS depend on the diagnostic criteria used and the characteristics of the population sample, and in the general population of women of reproductive age, the prevalence of the syndrome ranges from 6-9% to 19.9% [1,2]. According to modern criteria adopted by the consensus in Rotterdam, then systematically updated by ESHRE / ASRM (2014), the presence of two of the three criteria in a patient simultaneously allows to diagnose PCOS if other pathological conditions are excluded (thyroid pathology, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenogenitalsyndrome, androgen-secreting tumors, Itsenko-Cushing syndrome). Modern international diagnostic criteria include the following signs: (1) signs of polycystic ovaries according to information from pelvic ultrasound investigation (the presence of more than 10 follicles in each ovary);(2) oligo-anovulation;(3) clinical (presence of hirsutism) or biochemical (increased androgen levels) development of ovarian hyperandrogenism [3, 4]. Polycystic ovary syndrome is closely related to many diseases, including metabolic syndrome. Although insulin resistance is an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome and other diseases associated with PCOS, hyperandrogenismmay also be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and metabolic syndrome in female patients. Obesity is the most common symptom in PCOS patients (33-88%), which has a large impact on fertility and can lead to adverse effects such as menstrual irregularities, anovulation, infertility and abortion. Therefore, weight management in early PCOS is essential to improve fertility and quality of life. Hyperandrogenism plays a decisive role in abdominal obesity in obese women during adolescence, adulthood and menopause [5]. Although some studies have shown a negative association between plasma androgen levels (A4, DHEA and DHEAS) and obesity [6,7]. But the mechanism of how androgens affect fat cells in women is poorly understood. A number of observations show that among obese women with PCOS, metabolic disorders associated with insulin resistance and obesity, in many cases, play a more important role in the mechanism of anovulation in PCOS than excess androgens. In recent years, it has been established that in PCOS there is a frequent combination of hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. With insulin resistance, there is a decrease in the response of insulin-sensitive tissues to the hormone insulin with its sufficient level in the blood. Insulin resistance is found in 30-70% of patients with PCOS who are overweight or obese, and in patients with normal body weight it occurs in 20-25% of cases. The above facts, as well as our own observations, prompted us to analyze the studied women of fertile age with impaired reproductive system against the background of overweight and obesity. Considering the above, the aim of this study was to identify the relationship between insulin resistance and reproductive disorders in women with overweight and obesity. Material and research methods. The study included 123 women with clinical development of HA and impaired reproductive function, who consulted the consultative clinic of the RSSPMC of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Uzbekistan. The criteria for inclusion in the main group were: age of women from 18 to 35 years (average age was 25.8 .. 3.28 years), absence of pregnancy, body mass index over 25 kg / m2. Exclusion criteria from the main group: type 1 and 2 diabetes, pituitary tumors, hypogonadotropichypogonadism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, hypothyroidism, severe somatic pathology. All patients who applied for the consultation underwent: (1) Collection of anamnestic information. (2) Measurement of anthropometric indicators (height, weight, waist and hip circumference) and assessment of body hair growth using the Ferriman-Hallway scale. (3) Body mass index was

17.
Farmacja Polska ; 77(12):709, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1786597

ABSTRACT

During the pandemic of Coronavirus disease, many procedures and restrictions were implemented to stop the spread of the virus, though none of which is as efficient as vaccination. COVID-19 vaccines are vital for returning to a time before the pandemic. Moreover, analyzing the protective effects and complications of vaccines it is crucial to minimize its adverse effects. Our review analyzed 28 cases described in medical journals, of patients who developed subacute thyroiditis (SAT) after COVID-19 vaccines. Most commonly, SAT follows upper respiratory tract infections. Until 2016 only 5 cases of SAT after vaccinations had been reported. After COVID-19 vaccines, SAT developed mostly among women. Most cases were observed after the first dose, after seven days on average. In all presented patients, symptoms were similar, including mostly hyperthyroidism signs and pain. TSH level among 81% was low or undetectable. Treatment in most cases included anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications, propranololi hydrochloridum, and glucocorticoids, leading to full recovery. SAT occurs in healthy individuals with negative infection and thyroid disease medical history as well as in patients associated with thyroid diseases. The mechanism, which may lead to subacute thyroiditis, may be complex and involves angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, cross-reactions between thyroid peroxidase and spike protein, and the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). Cross-reaction between thyroid peroxidase and spike protein, nucleoproteins, and membrane protein of SARS-CoV-2 was proved on animal models. SARS-CoV2 infection mechanism requires the presence of ACE2 receptors and transmembrane serine protease (TMPRSS2), which were both found in thyroid follicular cells. Spike protein produced after vaccination, is modified (HexaPro), and it is more stable and binds higher than native viral protein. Some authors suggest that in effect it may lead to pyroptosis and thyroid cells destruction. Another potential mechanism of post-vaccine SAT is ASIA, which manifests with various symptoms, and although it is undermined by many health professionals some authors diagnosed ASIA in patients with SAT. SAT is a self-limiting disease and non-life-threatening. However, the diagnosis is very important, especially in individuals with risk factors of cardiovascular disease to prevent side effects of hyperthyroidism like cardiac arrhythmias, tachycardia, coronary syndromes, and side effects from other organs. © Polish Pharmacetical Society.

18.
Proceedings of the Latvian Academy of Sciences ; 76(1):161-162, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1785290
19.
Klin Lab Diagn ; 67(3): 140-146, 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761759

ABSTRACT

A new dangerous respiratory disease COVID-19 was first reported in China in December 2019, the pathogen SARS-Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), belonging to the beta coronavirus genus, which, in addition to SARS-CoV-2, includes SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV. The genome of SARS-CoV-2 is almost 80% similar to SARS-CoV-1 and 50% to MERS-CoV. The mechanisms of infection of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 are also similar and occur through the binding of the virus to the type 2 angiotensin-converting enzyme protein (ACE2), which is widely represented in the human body with predominant expression in endocrine tissues. In this connection, SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 affect the organs of the endocrine system, causing damage and hormonal changes that affect the prognosis of the course of COVID-19. This literature review is devoted to the analysis of changes in the organs of the endocrine system that occur during infection with SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2, as well as the potential effect of hormones on susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Endocrine System , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Osteoporosis International ; 32(SUPPL 1):S142, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1748503

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 pandemic was associated with increased risk of hypovitaminosis D due to lockdown regulations and limited outdoor activities, while young adult patients with autoimmune conditions may associated decreased values of 25-hydroxyvitamin D due to copresence of celiac disease, glucocorticoid exposure, malabsorption, overtreatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, etc. (1-5).We aim to introduce a female case known with autoimmune conditions who was admitted for vitaminD deficiency related symptoms during pandemic. Case report: A 41-year-old, nonsmoker female is admitted for nonspecific muscle cramps, and joints pain, asthenia which is persistent for the last several months in addition to chronic low back pain (which required chronic use of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory medication). Her personal medical background reveals a diagnosis of HLA-B27-positive ankylosing spondylitis that was established seven years before current admission. She is also known with autoimmune thyroiditis with negative antibodies, a diagnostic that was based on suggestive ultrasound features with highly hypoechoic pattern of relative small thyroid gland (and normal thyroid function). She is also confirmed with thrombophilia. She has a negative personal history of confirmed COVID-19 infection and she followed the lockdown restrictions for several weeks. The family medical history is irrelevant. On admission, clinical examination of the thyroid is within normal limits on amenstruated normal weighted female. Biochemistry data points out normal total calcium of 9.45 mg/dL (normal: 8.4-10.3 mg/dL). Endocrine panel shows TSH=1.28 μUI/mL (normal: 0.5-4.5 μUI/mL), free levothyroxine=11.65 pmol/L (normal: 9-19 pmol/L), anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies=10.88 UI/mL (normal: 0-35), anti-thyroglobulin antibodies=10 UI/mL (normal: 0-115 UI/mL). 25-hydroxyvitamin D=10 ng/mL (normal >30 ng/mL) with increased PTH levels and negative antibodies for celiac disease. Supplementation with daily 2000 UI of vitamin D for 12 weeks followed by daily 1000 UI was recommended. Conclusion: The association thrombophilia-hypovitaminosis D has been reported in some patients, but it is rather incidental. Chronic use of antiinflammatory medication may cause malabsorption, and also the potential of a second autoimmune disease at intestinal level may cause this deficiency, but the current pandemic reality has become a new cause of it.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL