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1.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1947042

ABSTRACT

Background:Identification of evidence-based factors related to status of the clinical research professional (CRP) workforce at academic medical centers (AMCs) will provide context for National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) policy considerations and guidance. The objective of this study is to explore barriers and opportunities related to the recruitment and retention of the CRP workforce.Materials and Methods:Qualitative data from a series of Un-Meeting breakout sessions and open-text survey questions were analyzed to explore barriers and recommendations for improving AMC CRP recruitment, retention and diversity.Results:While certain institutions have established competency-based frameworks for job descriptions, standardization remains generally lacking across CTSAs. AMCs report substantial increases in unfilled CRP positions leading to operational instability. Data confirmed an urgent need for closing gaps in CRP workforce at AMCs, especially for attracting, training, retaining, and diversifying qualified personnel. Improved collaboration with human resource departments, engagement with principal investigators, and overcoming both organizational and resource challenges were suggested strategies, as well as development of outreach to universities, community colleges, and high schools raising awareness of CRP career pathways.Discussion:Based on input from 130 CRP leaders at 35 CTSAs, four National Institute of General Medical Sciences’ Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program sites, along with industry and government representatives, we identified several barriers to successful recruitment and retention of a highly trained and diverse CRP workforce. Results, including securing institutional support, champions, standardizing and adopting proven national models, improving local institutional policies to facilitate CRP hiring and job progression point to potential solutions.

2.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1937385

ABSTRACT

Translational science is, by definition, groundbreaking;however, without an emphasis on quality and efficiency, some innovations in healthcare may translate into unnecessary risk, suboptimal solutions, and potentially loss of wellbeing and even lives. The COVID-19 pandemic and the Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA) Consortium's response created an opportunity for quality and efficiency to be better defined, expediently and thoughtfully addressed, and further studied as central foundations in the translational science mission. This paper presents findings of an environmental scan of adaptive capacity and preparedness to illuminate the assets, institutional environment, knowledge, and forward-looking decision making needed to optimize and sustain research quality and efficiency.

3.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915228

ABSTRACT

This paper is part of the Environmental Scan of Adaptive Capacity and Preparedness of Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) hubs, illuminating challenges, practices, and lessons learned related to CTSA hubs' efforts of engaging community partners to reduce the spread of the virus, address barriers to COVID-19 testing, identify treatments to improve health outcomes, and advance community participation in research. CTSA researchers, staff, and community partners collaborated to develop evidence-based, inclusive, accessible, and culturally appropriate strategies and resources helping community members stay healthy, informed, and connected during the pandemic. CTSA institutions have used various mechanisms to advance co-learning and co-sharing of knowledge, resources, tools, and experiences between academic professionals, patients, community partners, and other stakeholders. Forward-looking and adaptive decisionmaking structures are those that prioritize sustained relationships, mutual trust and commitment, ongoing communication, proactive identification of community concerns and needs, shared goals and decision making, as well as ample appreciation of community members and their contributions to translational research. There is a strong need for further community-engaged research and workforce training on how to build our collective and individual adaptive capacity to sustain and improve processes and outcomes of engagement with and by communities-in all aspects of translational science.

4.
Kutafin Law Review ; 9(1):175-190, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1904013

ABSTRACT

The development of modern medicine is associated with the dynamic translation (transfer) of basic medicine data to clinical research and further on to clinical practice. It is pointed out that research and development in the sphere of genetics and biotechnology, which are of particular significance during the COVID-19 pandemic, are of paramount importance in this regard. The concept of "translational distance" is analyzed as a measure of uncertainty, namely, the number and the size of logical leaps in course of transition from animal model trials to the first stages of human subject research. Translational research ethics has become a revolutionary, diverse, and distinct field of biomedical ethics. When studying the issue, special consideration is given to the critical blocks in translation as well as the characteristic features, types, and phases of translational research. It is emphasized that addressing the issue of minimizing irreducible uncertainty so that research participants could participate in research is a key component of ethical research. In view of the fact that the most important condition for the successful implementation of translational medicine is the adherence to the principles of bioethics when overcoming translational distances is analyzed taking into account the benefit-risk balance. As the development of translational medicine is significantly influenced by the legislation and the practice of its application, the national peculiarities of the attitude of different countries to the issues of ethics and the resolution thereof are studied, including the differences between the continental and the Anglo-Saxon legal families. Along with the formation of a general approach to the choice of a regulatory model in the sphere under consideration, the acceleration of circulation of the information related to science, research and technology, as well as the rapid obsolescence of innovations, should not be overlooked. At the same time, one should pay attention to the existing biological and other risks. © Authors 2022.

6.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1895535

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated health disparities and rendered them acutely more visible. Special and Underrepresented Populations need to be fully integrated in the translational research process from the very beginning and all the way through. This article presents findings and rapid-Analysis mini-case studies from the Environmental Scan (E-Scan) of Adaptive Capacity and Preparedness of Clinical and Translational Science Award hubs, specific to the goal of integrating special and vulnerable populations in different institutional research settings. In our discussion of the findings and case studies, we flexibly apply local adaptive capacity (LAC) framework concepts and characteristics, and, whenever possible, we present ideas on how to enhance capacity in those areas, based on the challenges and practices identified through the E-Scan. Although the past year has recorded incredible achievements in vaccine development, clinical trials, diagnostics and overall biomedical research, these successes continue to be hampered by our inability to turn them into achievements equally available and accessible to all populations.

7.
RSC Drug Discov. Ser. ; 2022-January:101-128, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1852525

ABSTRACT

Screening advanced compounds enables discovery of direct repurposing candidates, novel drug-like leads for optimization, and informative pharmacological probes. In this chapter, we describe different types of screening collections used in drug repurposing, discuss issues and considerations in preparing and executing a repurposing screen, and present examples of in vitro and in vivo repurposing assays. We further describe various data sources reporting information on de-risked compounds of different types and illustrate how data mining and chemoinformatic and chemogenomic searches can be used to access large numbers of advanced compounds and assemble collections most suitable for screening in a given disease model. We argue that a view of repurposing screening as a large-scale bet on finding candidates for clinical testing is narrow and incomplete. Rather, when thoughtfully executed, screening of re-risked compounds is informed by target pathobiology and offers a means to efficiently convert advances in the development of sophisticated non-clinical models and new insights in disease mechanisms into novel drug-like leads and candidates for development.

8.
Learning and Motivation ; : 101813, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821406

ABSTRACT

Intradimensional discrimination training may cause peak shift, in which participants respond more frequently to a novel stimulus presented during a generalization test than the positive exemplar used in training. Previous research has shown that peak shift is most likely to occur in participants who have achieved an intermediate level of proficiency with the discrimination. We sought to examine whether discrimination learning and peak shift could be altered through variations in stimulus discriminability. An international sample of 117 adults were trained to discriminate one visual representation of risk from COVID-19 (S+) from a second level of risk (S-) that was either lesser or greater. In a high discriminability condition, a single indicator of risk (a bar length) was presented on each trial. In a moderate discriminability condition, participants were required to estimate a person’s risk from multiple risk indicators. In a low discriminability condition, participants were additionally required to consider risk mitigation factors when estimating a person’s risk. Peak shift was absent in the high discriminability condition but present in the moderate condition. The low discriminability condition produced either flat or monotonic generalization gradients. The results additionally demonstrate how presenting health risk information to people in relatively simple or relatively complex ways affects their ability to judge that information correctly.

9.
EPMA J ; 13(2): 315-334, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797482

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer incidence is actually the highest one among all cancers. Overall breast cancer management is associated with challenges considering risk assessment and predictive diagnostics, targeted prevention of metastatic disease, appropriate treatment options, and cost-effectiveness of approaches applied. Accumulated research evidence indicates promising anti-cancer effects of phytochemicals protecting cells against malignant transformation, inhibiting carcinogenesis and metastatic spread, supporting immune system and increasing effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer therapies, among others. Molecular and sub-/cellular mechanisms are highly complex affecting several pathways considered potent targets for advanced diagnostics and cost-effective treatments. Demonstrated anti-cancer affects, therefore, are clinically relevant for improving individual outcomes and might be applicable to the primary (protection against initial cancer development), secondary (protection against potential metastatic disease development), and tertiary (towards cascading complications) care. However, a detailed data analysis is essential to adapt treatment algorithms to individuals' and patients' needs. Consequently, advanced concepts of patient stratification, predictive diagnostics, targeted prevention, and treatments tailored to the individualized patient profile are instrumental for the cost-effective application of natural anti-cancer substances to improve overall breast cancer management benefiting affected individuals and the society at large.

10.
14th IEEE International Conference on Computer Research and Development, ICCRD 2022 ; : 7-11, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1794838

ABSTRACT

Intelligent technologies including machine learning and artificial intelligence are playing significant roles in human's battle against COVID-19 pandemic. Machine learning enables the machine to learn and improve on its own without being programmed in detail. Machine learning has now penetrated into many fields to help fight the epidemic. However, a specific and representative review of the contributions of machine learning is currently lacking. The purpose of this paper is to summarize several machine learning applications against COVID-19 including: i) predicting confirmed cases and trend, ii) classifying and diagnosing using ML-based images, and iii) managing medical resources. A database related to machine learning Technologies for COVID-19 is created. Moreover, a concise review is finished on the collected information by evaluating the different uses of machine learning against COVID-19. We also assemble researches in the present COVID-19 literature focused on ML-based methods in order to demonstrate a profound insight into COVID-19 related topics. Our discoveries emphasize crucial variables and available COVID-19 resources that facilitate clinical and translational research. © 2022 IEEE.

11.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 24, 2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779651

ABSTRACT

With over 5 million COVID-19 deaths at the time of writing, the response of research leaders was and is critical to developing treatments to control the global pandemic. As clinical research leaders urgently repurposed existing research programmes and resources towards the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an opportunity to reflect on practices observed in Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) settings. BRCs are partnerships between leading National Health Service organizations and universities in England conducting translational research for patient benefit funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Oxford BRC-supported researchers have led the rapid set-up of numerous COVID-19 research studies at record speed with global impact. However, the specific contribution of BRCs to the COVID-19 pandemic in the literature is sparse. Firstly, we reflect on the strategic work of clinical research leaders, creating resilient NIHR research infrastructure to facilitate rapid COVID-19 research. Secondly, we discuss how COVID-19 rapid research exemplars supported by Oxford BRC illustrate "capacity", "readiness" and "capability" at an organizational and individual level to respond to the global pandemic. Rapid response research in turbulent environments requires strategic organizational leadership to create resilient infrastructure and resources. The rapid research exemplars from the Oxford BRC illustrate capability and capacity at an organizational and individual level in a dynamic environment to respond during the COVID-19 public health challenge. This response was underpinned by swift adaptation and repurposing of existing research resources and expertise by the Oxford BRC to deliver rapid research to address different aspects of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine
12.
Am J Transplant ; 22(8): 2089-2093, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735853

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus Omicron variant has now supplanted wild-type virus as the dominant circulating strain globally. Three doses of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine are recommended for transplant recipients as their primary vaccine series. However, the immunogenicity of mRNA vaccines as they specifically relate to the Omicron variant are not well studied. We analyzed Omicron-specific neutralization in transplant recipients after three-doses of mRNA-1273 vaccine. Neutralization was determined using a SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped lentivirus assay with constructs for Omicron and Delta variants. A total of 60 transplant patients (kidney, kidney-pancreas, lung, heart, liver) were analyzed 1 month and 3 months after completion of three doses of mRNA-1273. At 1 month, 11/60 (18.3%) patients had detectable neutralizing antibody responses to Omicron (log10 ID50 of 2.38 [range 1.34-3.57]). At 3 months, 8/51 (15.7%) were positive (median log10 ID50 [1.68; range 1.12-3.61; approximate fivefold reduction over time]). The proportion of positive patients was lower for Omicron versus wild-type, and Omicron vs. Delta (p < .001). No demographic variables were found to be significantly associated with Omicron response. Many patients with a positive anti-RBD response still had undetectable Omicron-specific neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, three doses of mRNA vaccine results in poor neutralizing responses against the Omicron variant in transplant patients.


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , COVID-19 , Transplant Recipients , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
13.
European Heart Journal ; 43(SUPPL 1):i225-i226, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1722401

ABSTRACT

Background: Medical research is critical to professional advancement, and mentoring is an important means of early research engagement in medical training. In contrast to international research collaborations, research mentoring programs are often locally limited. With the COVID- 19 pandemic causing drifts to virtual classes and conferences, virtual international medical research mentoring may be viable. We hereby describe our experience with a virtual, international mentorship group for cardiovascular research. Methods: Our virtual international research mentorship group has been running since 2015. The group focuses on risk stratification and outcomes research in cardiovascular medicine and epidemiology. Mentees from any country or region in all stages of medical careers are welcomed. Considering the increasing emphasis of contemporary research on multidisciplinary healthcare and translational research, our team also includes allied healthcare professionals or students, and graduates from natural sciences (Figure 1). With our members' diverse backgrounds, we firmly adhere to the principle that all members must be given equal opportunities and treatment, regardless of their age, gender, race, nationality, sexual orientation, family background, and institution of study or practice. We make use of virtual platforms and multi-level mentoring (both senior and peer mentoring), and emphasize active participation, early leadership, open culture, accessible research support, and a distributed research workflow (i.e. an accessible-distributed model). Results: Since establishment, our group has expanded to include 63 active members from 14 countries (Figure 2), leading a total of 109 peer-reviewed original studies and reviews published. We observed no significant difficulty in communication between team members, nor conflicts due to differences in nationality or ethnicity. Most studies involve cross-country and ethnicity collaborations, and inter-disciplinary and inter-regional knowledge exchanges are frequent. Multi-level mentoring ensured mentoring quality without compromising bonding and communication. Conclusion: An accessible-distributed model of virtual international medical research collaboration and multi-level mentoring is viable, efficient, and caters to the needs of contemporary healthcare. We hope that others will build similar models and improve medical research mentoring globally. (Figure Presented).

14.
Am J Transplant ; 22(8): 2099-2103, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685185

ABSTRACT

Immunocompromised patients may experience prolonged viral shedding after their initial SARS-CoV-2 infection, however, symptomatic relapses after remission currently remain rare. We herein describe a severe COVID-19 relapse case of a kidney transplant recipient (KTR) following rituximab therapy, 3 months after a moderate COVID-19 infection, despite viral clearance after recovery of the first episode. During the clinical relapse, the diagnosis was established on a broncho-alveolar lavage specimen (BAL) by RT-PCR. The infectivity of the BAL sample was confirmed on a cell culture assay. Whole genome sequencing confirmed the presence of an identical stain (Clade 20A). However, it had an acquired G142D mutation and a larger deletion of 3-amino-acids at position 143-145. These mutations located within the N-terminal domain are suggested to play a role in viral entry. The diagnosis of a COVID-19 relapse should be considered in the setting of unexplained persistent fever and/or respiratory symptoms in KTRs (especially for those after rituximab therapy), even in patients with previous negative naso-pharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 PCR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Recurrence , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention ; 31(1 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1677419

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION Under-representation in health-related research is one of a multitude of factors that contribute to cancer disparities experienced by African American and Latinx communities. Barriers to research participation stem from historical social injustices, are multi-faceted and include factors specific to the research process, research team members and community experiences and expectations about research participation. Informed consent is a longitudinal process and represents an opportunity to address these barriers and potentially improve access to research by individuals from underrepresented groups. The purpose of the Strengthening Translational Research in Diverse Enrollment (STRIDE) study was to develop and test an integrated, literacy- and culturally-sensitive, multi-component intervention that addresses barriers to research participation during the informed consent process. METHODS A multi-pronged community engaged approach was used to inform the development the three components of the STRIDE intervention. At each of the three study sites, Community Investigators, local community members of diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, contribute to intervention development, pilot testing and dissemination activities. Community engagement studios provided a semi-structured opportunity to solicit feedback from community experts in a facilitated group regarding the relevance, usability and understandability of the STRIDE intervention components. Additionally, component-specific approaches to obtaining community input were utilized. RESULTS The three components were developed and refined with community input. The STRIDE intervention includes: (1) an electronic consent (eConsent) framework within the REDCap software platform that incorporates tools designed to facilitate material comprehension and relevance, (2) a storytelling intervention in which prior research participants from diverse backgrounds share their experiences, and (3) a simulation-based training program for research assistants that emphasizes cultural competency and communication skills for assisting in the informed consent process. CONCLUSIONS The STRIDE project had produced an integrated set of interventions that are available to support researchers across the CTSA hubs and beyond in efforts to enhance diversity in clinical research. Early dissemination of STRIDE intervention components include utilization in national COVID-19 trials and research networks.

16.
IEEE Open J Eng Med Biol ; 2: 131-137, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592794

ABSTRACT

The RADxSM Tech program was a unique funding and support mechanism to accelerate the market introduction of diagnostic tests for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. In addition to providing funding, the RADx Tech program provided unprecedented levels of non- monetary support. Applications were evaluated using a deep dive process which involved a 1- to 2-week intensive collaboration between the applicant and a team of experts from RADx Tech. The result of this deep dive was a very comprehensive understanding of the potential and risks associated with the proposed work, which was far beyond what can typically be understood in a written grant application. This detail allowed the deep dive team to provide a better-informed recommendation on how to proceed. In some instances, the recommendation was made to not fund the project; in other cases, the recommendation was made to provide the applicant with more funding or support to help maximize their probability of success. After the deep dive, the project moved to a Work Package 1 (WP1) phase that focused on further de-risking. The same RADx Tech team that conducted the deep dive also worked with the applicant through the WP1 phase of the program. This allowed for joint responsibility of the work with the common goal of rapid, successful product introduction.

17.
IEEE Open J Eng Med Biol ; 2: 125-130, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598650

ABSTRACT

RADxSM Tech's mission is to rapidly accelerate deployment of SARS-CoV-2 tests and could not utilize typical grant application and review processes that can run 4 to 6 months. Instead, RADx Tech leveraged methodologies developed by CIMIT and utilized by POCTRN as described further in this special issue. RADx Tech uses a multi-stage review with two review panels, a Viability Panel and a Steering Panel, that are supported by subject matter experts and a Deep Dive team. Members of the panels have extensive commercialization and business experience in addition to scientific and technical knowledge. The Viability Panel is responsible for assessing whether the proposal is a good fit with the RADx Tech Program and whether it should be recommended to move into a Deep Dive. Less detailed information is requested in the application than a typical SBIR application since the application is refined and details added during the Deep Dive. The Steering Panel reviews the results from the Deep Dive and decides whether to recommend further funding. Everyone on the Viability Panel and Steering Panel reviews every application, thereby providing consistency and context for the reviewers. Utilization of an "assess, improve, and then select" process with review panels comprised of highly experienced review panel members has resulted in improved timing, efficiency, and effectiveness of reviews and has the potential to be extensible beyond RADx Tech.

18.
Am J Transplant ; 22(4): 1253-1260, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583700

ABSTRACT

Vaccine-induced SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses are attenuated in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) and breakthrough infections are more common. Additional SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses increase anti-spike IgG in some SOTRs, but it is uncertain whether neutralization of variants of concern (VOCs) is enhanced. We tested 47 SOTRs for clinical and research anti-spike IgG, pseudoneutralization (ACE2 blocking), and live-virus neutralization (nAb) against VOCs before and after a third SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose (70% mRNA, 30% Ad26.COV2.S) with comparison to 15 healthy controls after two mRNA vaccine doses. We used correlation analysis to compare anti-spike IgG assays and focused on thresholds associated with neutralization. A third SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose increased median total anti-spike (1.6-fold), pseudoneutralization against VOCs (2.5-fold vs. Delta), and neutralizing antibodies (1.4-fold against Delta). However, neutralization activity was significantly lower than healthy controls (p < .001); 32% of SOTRs had zero detectable nAb against Delta after third vaccination compared to 100% for controls. Correlation with nAb was seen at anti-spike IgG >4 Log10 (AU/ml) on the Euroimmun ELISA and >4 Log10 (AU/ml) on the MSD research assay. These findings highlight benefits of a third vaccine dose for some SOTRs and the need for alternative strategies to improve protection in a significant subset of this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients , Vaccines, Synthetic
19.
J Clin Transl Sci ; 6(1): e8, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537232

ABSTRACT

Developing the translational research workforce is a goal established by the National Center for Advancing Translational Science for its network of Clinical and Translational Science Award Program hubs. We surveyed faculty and research staff at our institution about their needs and preferences, utilization of existing trainings, and barriers and facilitators to research training. A total of 545 (21.9%) faculty and staff responded to the survey and rated grant development, research project development, and professional development among their top areas for further training. Faculty prioritized statistical methods and dissemination and implementation, while staff prioritized research compliance and research administration. Faculty (73.9%; n = 119) and staff (87.3%; n = 165) reported that additional training would give them more confidence in completing their job responsibilities. Time and lack of awareness were the most common barriers to training. Our results indicate the value of training across a range of topics with unique needs for faculty and staff. This pre-COVID survey identified time, awareness, and access to training opportunities as key barriers for faculty and staff. The shift to remote work spurred by the pandemic has further heightened the need for effective and readily accessible online trainings to enable continuous development of the clinical and translational research workforce.

20.
Thyroid ; 32(1): 3-8, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528154

ABSTRACT

Background: Every year, the American Thyroid Association (ATA) Annual Meeting opening session features presentations covering the most recent advances in the three major areas of thyroidology: basic, clinical, and surgical. As the ATA did not have an annual meeting in 2020, because of the COVID19 pandemic, the 2021 meeting opened with a special "Two Years in Thyroidology" session. Methods: A PubMed electronic search was conducted to identify original basic science research studies on thyroid cancer published between October 2019 and September 2021. Methodologically rigorous studies that were deemed most likely to influence the field of basic science research in thyroid cancer were grouped into three thematic units: Genetics and Genomics, Molecular Biology and Signaling, and Preclinical and Translational Science. Four publications for each category were chosen for discussion. Results: Selected studies covered topics ranging from the genetics of thyroid cancer predisposition to the genomics of anaplastic thyroid cancer evolution, from novel molecular pathways involved in thyroid cancer pathogenesis to potentially game-changing imaging and therapeutic innovations. Conclusions: The past two years, in the face of unique COVID19 pandemic-associated hurdles, have witnessed a large number of important developments in basic and translational thyroid cancer research. These studies not only have shed novel light on a number of long-standing scientific questions but have also highlighted the major challenges and open questions that still remain to be addressed in the coming years.


Subject(s)
Research/trends , Societies/trends , Thyroid Neoplasms/therapy , Endocrinology/methods , Humans , Societies/organization & administration , Thyroid Neoplasms/physiopathology , United States
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