Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.119
Filter
1.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-7, 2021 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075651

ABSTRACT

The United Kingdom (UK) was among the hardest-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is, therefore, imperative to understand the coping strategies of individuals in the UK during the pandemic to develop appropriate programs and policies for them. A heterogeneous sample of 50 UK residents (15 males & 35 females) with an age range of 18-55 years were recruited using a snowball technique from Facebook between April and May 2020. Participants responded to 4 open-ended questions (that were generated through consultation with literature and 2 health practitioners) that sought to explore their coping strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thematic analysis was applied to analyze data using a data-driven method. Eleven themes were found: "socializing with loved ones (e.g., through video calls)", "engaging in exercise", "being occupied with jobs", "being occupied with studies", "avoiding negative news on COVID-19", "consumption of alcohol", "healthy eating", "engaging in meditation activities", "gaming activities", "hope", and "self-care and self-appreciation", in that order. Positive and maladaptive coping strategies were employed by some individuals in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic. This, therefore, echoes the need for appropriate psychosocial support programs that strengthen positive coping strategies and mitigate maladaptive coping strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Journal of Contemporary European Research ; 18(1):115-132, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072448

ABSTRACT

This article discusses how the Covid-19 pandemic has the potential to exacerbate inequalities and social isolation through the analytical lens of Mbembe's necropolitics. To this end, the article examines the UK Government approach to providing LGBTQI+ asylum claimants' access to safe accommodation and health service. The analysis shows that the Home Office's policies around housing and health during the Covid-19 pandemic is closely linked to 'hostile environment' policies -amplifying housing and food precarity, isolation, exposure to violence, economic insecurity as well as physical and mental health problems for LGBTQI+ asylum claimants. The claim is made that there is a lack of intersectionality in the governmental approach to refugees and Covid-19 which creates a support gap for particularly LGBTQI+ asylum claimants. The data used for the writing of this article is based on 14 semi-structured interviews conducted between August 2020 and April 2021 with social/charity workers, asylum claimants and refugees affiliated with NGO help organisations in Glasgow, Birmingham, Cardiff, Brighton, Belfast, and London.

3.
Bmj Paediatrics Open ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070583

ABSTRACT

Introduction Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy or in the neonatal period may impact fetal or neonatal brain development either through direct central nervous system infection or indirectly through the adverse effects of viral infection-related inflammation in the mother or newborn infant. This study aims to determine whether there are early neurodevelopmental effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods and analysis We will conduct a prospective national population-based cohort study of children aged 21-24 months who were born at term (>= 37 weeks' gestation) between 1 March 2020 and 28 February 2021 and were either antenatally exposed, neonatally exposed or unexposed (comparison cohort) to SARS-CoV-2. Nationally, hospitals will identify and approach parents of children eligible for inclusion in the antenatally and neonatally exposed cohorts using information from the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) and British Paediatric Surveillance Unit (BPSU) national surveillance studies and will identify and approach eligible children for the comparison cohort through routine birth records. Parents will be asked to complete questionnaires to assess their child's development at 21-24 months of age. Outcome measures comprise the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, Third Edition (ASQ-3), Ages and Stages Questionnaire Social-Emotional, Second Edition (ASQ-SE-2), Liverpool respiratory symptoms questionnaire and questionnaire items to elicit information about healthcare usage. With parental consent, study data will be linked to routine health and education records for future follow-up. Regression models will compare ASQ-3 and ASQ-SE-2 scores and proportions, frequency of respiratory symptoms and healthcare usage between the exposed and comparison cohorts, adjusting for potential confounders. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the London-Westminster Research Ethics Committee. Findings will be disseminated in scientific conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications.

4.
Tran, K. B.; Lang, J. J.; Compton, K.; Xu, R. X.; Acheson, A. R.; Henrikson, H. J.; Kocarnik, J. M.; Penberthy, L.; Aali, A.; Abbas, Q.; Abbasi, B.; Abbasi-Kangevari, M.; Abbasi-Kangevari, Z.; Abbastabar, H.; Abdelmasseh, M.; Abd-Elsalam, S.; Abdelwahab, A. A.; Abdoli, G.; Abdulkadir, H. A.; Abedi, A.; Abegaz, K. H.; Abidi, H.; Aboagye, R. G.; Abolhassani, H.; Absalan, A.; Abtew, Y. D.; Ali, H. A.; Abu-Gharbieh, E.; Achappa, B.; Acuna, J. M.; Addison, D.; Addo, I. Y.; Adegboye, O. A.; Adesina, M. A.; Adnan, M.; Adnani, Q. E. S.; Advani, S. M.; Afrin, S.; Afzal, M. S.; Aggarwal, M.; Ahinkorah, B. O.; Ahmad, A. R.; Ahmad, R.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmadi, S.; Ahmed, H.; Ahmed, L. A.; Ahmed, M. B.; Rashid, T. A.; Aiman, W.; Ajami, M.; Akalu, G. T.; Akbarzadeh-Khiavi, M.; Aklilu, A.; Akonde, M.; Akunna, C. J.; Al Hamad, H.; Alahdab, F.; Alanezi, F. M.; Alanzi, T. M.; Alessy, S. A.; Algammal, A. M.; Al-Hanawi, M. K.; Alhassan, R. K.; Ali, B. A.; Ali, L.; Ali, S. S.; Alimohamadi, Y.; Alipour, V.; Aljunid, S. M.; Alkhayyat, M.; Al-Maweri, S. A. A.; Almustanyir, S.; Alonso, N.; Alqalyoobi, S.; Al-Raddadi, R. M.; Al-Rifai, R. H. H.; Al-Sabah, S. K.; Al-Tammemi, A. B.; Altawalah, H.; Alvis-Guzman, N.; Amare, F.; Ameyaw, E. K.; Dehkordi, J. J. A.; Amirzade-Iranaq, M. H.; Amu, H.; Amusa, G. A.; Ancuceanu, R.; Anderson, J. A.; Animut, Y. A.; Anoushiravani, A.; Anoushirvani, A. A.; Ansari-Moghaddam, A.; Ansha, M. G.; Antony, B.; Antwi, M. H.; Anwar, S. L.; Anwer, R.; Anyasodor, A. E.; Arabloo, J.; Arab-Zozani, M.; Aremu, O.; Argaw, A. M.; Ariffin, H.; Aripov, T.; Arshad, M.; Al, Artaman, Arulappan, J.; Aruleba, R. T.; Aryannejad, A.; Asaad, M.; Asemahagn, M. A.; Asemi, Z.; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M.; Ashraf, T.; Assadi, R.; Athar, M.; Athari, S. S.; Null, Mmwa, Attia, S.; Aujayeb, A.; Ausloos, M.; Avila-Burgos, L.; Awedew, A. F.; Awoke, M. A.; Awoke, T.; Quintanilla, B. P. A.; Ayana, T. M.; Ayen, S. S.; Azadi, D.; Null, S. A.; Azami-Aghdash, S.; Azanaw, M. M.; Azangou-Khyavy, M.; Jafari, A. A.; Azizi, H.; Azzam, A. Y. Y.; Babajani, A.; Badar, M.; Badiye, A. D.; Baghcheghi, N.; Bagheri, N.; Bagherieh, S.; Bahadory, S.; Baig, A. A.; Baker, J. L.; Bakhtiari, A.; Bakshi, R. K.; Banach, M.; Banerjee, I.; Bardhan, M.; Barone-Adesi, F.; Barra, F.; Barrow, A.; Bashir, N. Z.; Bashiri, A.; Basu, S.; Batiha, A. M. M.; Begum, A.; Bekele, A. B.; Belay, A. S.; Belete, M. A.; Belgaumi, U. I.; Bell, A. W.; Belo, L.; Benzian, H.; Berhie, A. Y.; Bermudez, A. N. C.; Bernabe, E.; Bhagavathula, A. S.; Bhala, N.; Bhandari, B. B.; Bhardwaj, N.; Bhardwaj, P.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Bhojaraja, V. S.; Bhuyan, S. S.; Bibi, S.; Bilchut, A. H.; Bintoro, B. S.; Biondi, A.; Birega, M. G. B.; Birhan, H. E.; Bjorge, T.; Blyuss, O.; Bodicha, B. B. A.; Bolla, S. R.; Boloor, A.; Bosetti, C.; Braithwaite, D.; Brauer, M.; Brenner, H.; Briko, A. N.; Briko, N. I.; Buchanan, C. M.; Bulamu, N. B.; Bustamante-Teixeira, M. T.; Butt, M. H.; Butt, N. S.; Butt, Z. A.; dos Santos, F. L. C.; Camera, L. A.; Cao, C.; Cao, Y.; Carreras, G.; Carvalho, M.; Cembranel, F.; Cerin, E.; Chakraborty, P. A.; Charalampous, P.; Chattu, V. K.; Chimed-Ochir, O.; Chirinos-Caceres, J. L.; Cho, D. Y.; Cho, W. C. S.; Christopher, D. J.; Chu, D. T.; Chukwu, I. S.; Cohen, A. J.; Conde, J.; Cortas, S.; Costa, V. M.; Cruz-Martins, N.; Culbreth, G. T.; Dadras, O.; Dagnaw, F. T.; Dahlawi, S. M. A.; Dai, X. C.; Dandona, L.; Dandona, R.; Daneshpajouhnejad, P.; Danielewicz, A.; Dao, A. T. M.; Soltani, R. D. C.; Darwesh, A. M.; Das, S.; Davitoiu, D. V.; Esmaeili, E. D.; De la Hoz, F. P.; Debela, S. A.; Dehghan, A.; Demisse, B.; Demisse, F. W.; Denova-Gutierrez, E.; Derakhshani, A.; Molla, M. D.; Dereje, D.; Deribe, K. S.; Desai, R.; Desalegn, M. D.; Dessalegn, F. N.; Dessalegni, S. A. A.; Dessie, G.; Desta, A. A.; Dewan, S. M. R.; Dharmaratne, S. D.; Dhimal, M.; Dianatinasab, M.; Diao, N.; Diaz, D.; Digesa, L. E.; Dixit, S. G.; Doaei, S.; Doan, L. P.; Doku, P. N.; Dongarwar, D.; dos Santos, W. M.; Driscoll, T. R.; Dsouza, H. L.; Durojaiye, O. C.; Edalati, S.; Eghbalian, F.; Ehsani-Chimeh, E.; Eini, E.; Ekholuenetale, M.; Ekundayo, T. C.; Ekwueme, D. U.; El Tantawi, M.; Elbahnasawy, M. A.; Elbarazi, I.; Elghazaly, H.; Elhadi, M.; El-Huneidi, W.; Emamian, M. H.; Bain, L. E.; Enyew, D. B.; Erkhembayar, R.; Eshetu, T.; Eshrati, B.; Eskandarieh, S.; Espinosa-Montero, J.; Etaee, F.; Etemadimanesh, A.; Eyayu, T.; Ezeonwumelu, I. J.; Ezzikouri, S.; Fagbamigbe, A. F.; Fahimi, S.; Fakhradiyev, I. R.; Faraon, E. J. A.; Fares, J.; Farmany, A.; Farooque, U.; Farrokhpour, H.; Fasanmi, A. O.; Fatehizadeh, A.; Fatima, W.; Fattahi, H.; Fekadu, G.; Feleke, B. E.; Ferrari, A. A.; Ferrero, S.; Desideri, L. F.; Filip, I.; Fischer, F.; Foroumadi, R.; Foroutan, M.; Fukumoto, T.; Gaal, P. A.; Gad, M. M.; Gadanya, M. A.; Gaipov, A.; Galehdar, N.; Gallus, S.; Garg, T.; Fonseca, M. G.; Gebremariam, Y. H.; Gebremeskel, T. G.; Gebremichael, M. A.; Geda, Y. F.; Gela, Y. Y.; Gemeda, B. N. B.; Getachew, M.; Getachew, M. E.; Ghaffari, K.; Ghafourifard, M.; Ghamari, S. H.; Nour, M. G.; Ghassemi, F.; Ghimire, A.; Ghith, N.; Gholamalizadeh, M.; Navashenaq, J. G.; Ghozy, S.; Gilani, S. A.; Gill, P. S.; Ginindza, T. G.; Gizaw, A. T. T.; Glasbey, J. C.; Godos, J.; Goel, A.; Golechha, M.; Goleij, P.; Golinelli, D.; Golitaleb, M.; Gorini, G.; Goulart, B. N. G.; Grosso, G.; Guadie, H. A.; Gubari, M. I. M.; Gudayu, T. W.; Guerra, M. R.; Gunawardane, D. A.; Gupta, B.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, V.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurara, M. K.; Guta, A.; Habibzadeh, P.; Avval, A. H.; Hafezi-Nejad, N.; Ali, A. H.; Haj-Mirzaian, A.; Halboub, E. S.; Halimi, A.; Halwani, R.; Hamadeh, R. R.; Hameed, S.; Hamidi, S.; Hanif, A.; Hariri, S.; Harlianto, N. I.; Haro, J. M.; Hartono, R. K.; Hasaballah, A. I.; Hasan, S. M. M.; Hasani, H.; Hashemi, S. M.; Hassan, A. M.; Hassanipour, S.; Hayat, K.; Heidari, G.; Heidari, M.; Heidarymeybodi, Z.; Herrera-Serna, B. Y.; Herteliu, C.; Hezam, K.; Hiraike, Y.; Hlongwa, M. M.; Holla, R.; Holm, M.; Horita, N.; Hoseini, M.; Hossain, M. M.; Hossain, M. B. H.; Hosseini, M. S.; Hosseinzadeh, A.; Hosseinzadeh, M.; Hostiuc, M.; Hostiuc, S.; Househ, M.; Huang, J. J.; Hugo, F. N.; Humayun, A.; Hussain, S.; Hussein, N. R.; Hwang, B. F.; Ibitoye, S. E.; Iftikhar, P. M.; Ikuta, K. S.; Ilesanmi, O. S.; Ilic, I. M.; Ilic, M. D.; Immurana, M.; Innos, K.; Iranpour, P.; Irham, L. M.; Islam, M. S.; Islam, R. M.; Islami, F.; Ismail, N. E.; Isola, G.; Iwagami, M.; Merin, J. L.; Jaiswal, A.; Jakovljevic, M.; Jalili, M.; Jalilian, S.; Jamshidi, E.; Jang, S. I.; Jani, C. T.; Javaheri, T.; Jayarajah, U. U.; Jayaram, S.; Jazayeri, S. B.; Jebai, R.; Jemal, B.; Jeong, W.; Jha, R. P.; Jindal, H. A.; John-Akinola, Y. O.; Jonas, J. B.; Joo, T.; Joseph, N.; Joukar, F.; Jozwiak, J. J.; Jarisson, M.; Kabir, A.; Kacimi, S. E. O.; Kadashetti, V.; Kahe, F.; Kakodkar, P. V.; Kalankesh, L. R.; Kalhor, R.; Kamal, V. K.; Kamangar, F.; Kamath, A.; Kanchan, T.; Kandaswamy, E.; Kandel, H.; Kang, H.; Kanno, G. G.; Kapoor, N.; Kar, S. S.; Karanth, S. D.; Karaye, I. M.; Karch, A.; Karimi, A.; Kassa, B. G.; Katoto, Pdmc, Kauppila, J. H.; Kaur, H.; Kebede, A. G.; Keikavoosi-Arani, L.; Kejela, G. G.; Bohan, P. M. K.; Keramati, M.; Keykhaei, M.; Khajuria, H.; Khan, A.; Khan, A. A. K.; Khan, E. A.; Khan, G.; Khan, M. N.; Ab Khan, M.; Khanali, J.; Khatab, K.; Khatatbeh, M. M.; Khatib, M. N.; Khayamzadeh, M.; Kashani, H. R. K.; Tabari, M. A. K.; et al..
Lancet ; 400(10352):563-591, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068419

ABSTRACT

Background Understanding the magnitude of cancer burden attributable to potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial for development of effective prevention and mitigation strategies. We analysed results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2019 to inform cancer control planning efforts globally. Methods The GBD 2019 comparative risk assessment framework was used to estimate cancer burden attributable to behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risk factors. A total of 82 risk-outcome pairs were included on the basis of the World Cancer Research Fund criteria. Estimated cancer deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) in 2019 and change in these measures between 2010 and 2019 are presented. Findings Globally, in 2019, the risk factors included in this analysis accounted for 4.45 million (95% uncertainty interval 4.01-4.94) deaths and 105 million (95.0-116) DALYs for both sexes combined, representing 44.4% (41.3-48.4) of all cancer deaths and 42.0% (39.1-45.6) of all DALYs. There were 2.88 million (2.60-3.18) risk-attributable cancer deaths in males (50.6% [47.8-54.1] of all male cancer deaths) and 1.58 million (1.36-1.84) risk-attributable cancer deaths in females (36.3% [32.5-41.3] of all female cancer deaths). The leading risk factors at the most detailed level globally for risk-attributable cancer deaths and DALYs in 2019 for both sexes combined were smoking, followed by alcohol use and high BMI. Risk-attributable cancer burden varied by world region and Socio-demographic Index (SDI), with smoking, unsafe sex, and alcohol use being the three leading risk factors for risk-attributable cancer DALYs in low SDI locations in 2019, whereas DALYs in high SDI locations mirrored the top three global risk factor rankings. From 2010 to 2019, global risk-attributable cancer deaths increased by 20.4% (12.6-28.4) and DALYs by 16.8% (8.8-25.0), with the greatest percentage increase in metabolic risks (34.7% [27.9-42.8] and 33.3% [25.8-42.0]). Interpretation The leading risk factors contributing to global cancer burden in 2019 were behavioural, whereas metabolic risk factors saw the largest increases between 2010 and 2019. Reducing exposure to these modifiable risk factors would decrease cancer mortality and DALY rates worldwide, and policies should be tailored appropriately to local cancer risk factor burden. Copyright (C) 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.

5.
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science ; 11(6):33-42, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067466

ABSTRACT

A B S T R A C T The small business sector has been identified as an essential component of the global economy, especially in the developing economies, where it plays a significant role in addressing Job creation and poverty. Keywords: Immigrants, Immigrant-Entrepreneurs, COVID- 19 Bailout, Discrimination, Prejudice Introduction The incidence and subsequent rapid spread of the Coronavirus have devastated the world economy, nearly grounding it to a halt at the height of the pandemic, and the vestiges of this economic devastation remain in various countries to different extents. The small business sector has been identified as an important component of the global economy, especially in developing economies where it plays a significant role in addressing job creation and poverty. Immigrant entrepreneurship presents an important economic opportunity for South Africa in form of employment creation which has important implications for the reduction of poverty and inequality, as well as stimulation of economic growth in the country (Fatoki, 2014;Ngota et al., 2018).

6.
Clinical Medicine ; 22(5):496-497, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067214

ABSTRACT

Letters should be limited to 350 words, and sent by email to: clinicalmedicine@rcp.ac.uk End-tidal carbon dioxide as a screening tool in excluding pulmonary embolism Editor - In our 2014 article, we demonstrated that end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2;the level of carbon dioxide that is released at the end of an exhaled breath) is a reliable screening test to rule out pulmonary embolism.1 There were a small number of patients (n=100), with only 38 patients with pulmonary emboli (PEs). The fact that NiV is in the World Health Organization (WHO) Research and Development (R&D) Blueprint list of epidemic threats requiring urgent R&D action highlights the global concern regarding NiV.2 Despite the high mortality from NiV infection ranging from 40% to 91%, Dr Alam also emphasises that there are no licensed treatments, with care being only supportive.1 Lessons must be learnt from our experiences with the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the ongoing multi-country monkeypox outbreak.3 Greater efforts must be made to optimise our preparedness for future potential threats (such as NiV) and take advantage of any opportunities that may facilitate this preparedness;for example, regarding antiviral therapy for NiV infection, a study was conducted in which African green monkeys were challenged with a lethal dose of NiV (Bangladesh genotype): all animals who received remdesivir survived whereas all the control animals died.4 Remdesivir has been used widely during the COVID-19 pandemic and continues to feature in current national COVID-19 treatment guidelines.5 We should, therefore, utilise our vast experience with the use of this antiviral to study its potential role in the treatment of human NiV infection. In macaques, remdesivir penetrates poorly into the central nervous system (CNS) with a brain:plasma ratio of <0.05.6 However, its CNS penetration in humans is largely unknown but is of interest not only because NiV frequently causes an encephalitis but also in view of the fact that there have been numerous reports of COVID-19-associated encephalitis.7 Many patients with COVID-19-associated neurological disease receive remdesivir that potentially provides an opportunity to study its blood brain barrier penetration and/ or characterise the effects of remdesivir on brain tissue through post-mortem studies, indirectly providing valuable information regarding its possible utility in the treatment of CNS disease caused by NiV.8,9 * TEMI LAMPEJO Consultant in infectious diseases and virology, King's College Hospital, London, UK References 1 Alam AM.

7.
Nursing Standard ; 35(7):67-69, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067177

ABSTRACT

Research released by NHS England shows that the overall death rate for people with diabetes doubled during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12004, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066382

ABSTRACT

Given the importance that current food-related challenges pose to our society, the potential of local food initiatives to address sustainability has gained increased attention. Nevertheless, research has increasingly demonstrated that local food initiatives are limited in fulfilling their sustainability potential. This realisation has led many scholars to argue that the path towards food system transformation needs to be based on interconnected networks of these ‘alternative’ practices—what this paper terms local food systems. Nevertheless, as many local food initiatives rely on funding and volunteer work, their capacity to create infrastructures for integrated approaches is limited. In this context, influential players—those who can provide resources, such as local authorities—become key in the assemblage of local food systems. However, there is limited understanding of how the role of local authorities affects the internal dynamics of local food systems and potential outcomes. This study addresses this research gap by analysing two case studies (Preston, England and Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country). Using urban political ecology (UPE) as a theoretical framework, this study offers original insight into the key governance elements affecting the direction of local food systems and thus the alignment of diverse local food initiatives, limiting their sustainability potential.

9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065923

ABSTRACT

Health care lies at the forefront of the impacts of climate change. Since the health sector is a major polluting and emission intensive sector, it remains a crucial challenge to address sustainability. The English National Health System (NHS) aims to be the first in the world to achieve net zero in all emission classes (Scope 1-3). In Germany, sustainability in health care is being driven bottom-up, while the Federal Ministry of Health at the time of the research in early 2021 takes no active stance on a net zero health care system. This article analyses the approaches to sustainability in the two different health care systems, explores common challenges, and draws recommendations to support the transition of the sector to a net zero future. An exploratory mixed method approach was taken applying qualitative and quantitative methods. This includes high-level expert interviews and an online survey from the United Kingdom (UK) and Germany. Results reveal the complex nature of health care systems and the need for engraining a systems-thinking approach. The findings call for the legal embedding of sustainability into the key principles of health care in Germany, endorses the ambition of the national health care systems in the UK, recommends collaborative cross-sector approaches for sustainability, and highlights the need for increased public awareness on the interrelation between human and planetary health to enable governance for sustainable health care.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Climate Change , Germany , Humans , United Kingdom
10.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604973, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065660

ABSTRACT

Objectives: As a risk communication tool, social media was mobilised at an unprecedented level during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined health authorities' risk communication on social media in response to the pandemic in 2020. Methods: We analysed 1,633 COVID-19-related posts from 15 social media accounts managed by official health authorities in Germany, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Results: The rate at which the authorities posted about COVID-19 on social media fluctuated throughout 2020. Each account's posting frequency peaked between March and May 2020, before dropping considerably during the summer. The messages that the organisations focused on also varied throughout the year but covered most risk communication guidelines. Yet, our analysis highlighted themes that were communicated infrequently, such as long COVID or exercising during the pandemic. Conclusion: With more individuals now following health authorities on social media, platforms such as Instagram hold great potential for future risk communication campaigns and strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Social Media , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Sustainability ; 14(19):11956, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066380

ABSTRACT

Developing physical activity guidelines based on the life cycle concept is conducive to accelerating the realization of the goal of “all-round, full-cycle maintenance and protection to greatly improve people’s health” in the Healthy China 2030 Planning Outline. Based on a policy tools perspective, this study uses the text analysis method to collect and analyze physical activity guidelines based on the life cycle concept from five economically developed countries: the USA, Japan, Canada, Australia, and the UK. The policy tools, country data, and stages of the life cycle were used to develop physical activity guidelines in China to accelerate the realization of the Healthy China 2030 strategy based on the following principles: (1) Strengthen sectoral cooperation and establish a system of policy instruments;(2) increase publicity and scientific awareness of physical activity and exercise;(3) focus on talent cultivation and improve guideline research and development;and (4) mobilize the power of all sectors to promote the implementation of physical activity guidelines.

12.
Sustainability ; 14(19):11949, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066379

ABSTRACT

The refurbishment of building facilities needs to incorporate end-user engagement to ensure refurbished building facilities outcomes that include user-responsive learning spaces and satisfy users’ learning needs. However, existing refurbishment design process frameworks neglect to show the engagement process. A new framework for engaging end users in the refurbishment design of building facilities in higher education is presented. A qualitative research methodology was employed to obtain and analyse interview data from twenty-one design team stakeholders involved in two cases of refurbished building facilities in higher education institutions in Australia and New Zealand. The findings revealed four core themes which indicate the context and phases in the refurbishment design process where end-user engagement should be taken seriously. They are the higher education context, early design, user engagement in the design process and post-design phases. In addition, the findings revealed six specific strategies for end-user engagement in the refurbishment design of building facilities in higher education institutions. They are identifying stakeholder value systems, capturing end-user needs, communicating and integrating. Others are the setting of engagement boundaries and surveying of end users. This study modified the project heartbeat originally developed by Stanford University in 2010 for the refurbishment design process in a higher education context. The new framework bridges the gaps in the current literature between stakeholder theory and refurbishment design, and, by incorporating the refurbishment design processes, the framework can be employed in wider education and other project contexts to facilitate the balanced involvement of end users.

13.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1884, 2022 10 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Occupational exposures may play a key role in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection risk. We used a job-exposure matrix linked to the UK Biobank to measure occupational characteristics and estimate associations with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test. METHODS: People reporting job titles at their baseline interview in England who were < 65 years of age in 2020 were included. Healthcare workers were excluded because of differential access to testing. Jobs were linked to the US Occupational Information Network (O*NET) job exposure matrix. O*NET-based scores were examined for occupational physical proximity, exposure to diseases/infection, working outdoors exposed to weather, and working outdoors under cover (score range = 1-5). Jobs were classified as remote work using two algorithms. SARS-CoV-2 test results were evaluated between August 5th-November 10th, 2020, when the UK was released from lockdown. Cox regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs), accounting for age, sex, race, education, neighborhood deprivation, assessment center, household size, and income. RESULTS: We included 115,451 people with job titles, of whom 1746 tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. A one-point increase in physical proximity score was associated with 1.14 times higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 (95%CI = 1.05-1.24). A one-point increase in the exposure to diseases/infections score was associated with 1.09 times higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 (95%CI = 1.02-1.16). People reporting jobs that could not be done remotely had higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 regardless of the classification algorithm used (aHRs = 1.17 and 1.20). Outdoors work showed an association with SARS-CoV-2 (exposed to weather aHR = 1.06, 95%CI = 1.01-1.11; under cover aHR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.00-1.17), but these associations were not significant after accounting for whether work could be done remotely. CONCLUSION: People in occupations that were not amenable to remote work, required closer physical proximity, and required more general exposure to diseases/infection had higher risk of a positive SARS-CoV-2 test. These findings provide additional evidence that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an occupational disease, even outside of the healthcare setting, and indicate that strategies for mitigating transmission in in-person work settings will remain important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Exposure , Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
14.
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society ; 2022, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064331

ABSTRACT

The European Union is facing the highest natural gas prices in 15 years, owing largely to an upward trend in electricity prices, which is also on an uphill curve. However, the rise in electricity and natural gas prices is a widespread phenomenon that is being felt not only in Europe but also globally, as economic activity resumes and energy consumption returns to prepandemic levels. Consequently, this paper investigates how COVID-19 influenced the Romanian energy market. To accomplish our goal, we used daily data for variables and market indices that characterize COVID-19 and the energy market from July 1 to December 21, 2021. The results of the GARCH (1, 1) model estimation show that the major performer in Romania’s energy allocation and supply market had the highest conditional variance. In addition, the ARDL model was chosen because of the variable integration mix (order 0 and 1), as well as the VAR and the Granger causality framework. The empirical results of ARDL models provide the first conclusion of the analysis, indicating that the number of short-term connections was greater than long-term connections, which is also explained by the presence of short episodes of high volatility recorded in the investigated time interval. Another conclusion drawn from this study is that COVID-19 cases registered in Europe and around the world have made a significant contribution to explaining the evolution of the energy market, owing to the large number of cases registered in these regions and the level of contagion transmitted from these markets to the energy market. Furthermore, based on the Granger causality test results, only one-way causal relationships were identified from the variables that capture the evolution of the COVID-9 pandemic to the yields of Romanian energy companies. The novelty of this article is the examination of the impact of COVID-19 on the energy market throughout the fourth wave of coronavirus using the GARCH framework, the ARDL model, which allows for the capture of both short- and long-term reactions, the variance decomposition, and the Granger causality test. Because of the ongoing changes in the pandemic’s evolution, additional research on this topic is undoubtedly on the horizon in the near future.

15.
Gut ; 71(Suppl 3):A91-A92, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064235

ABSTRACT

P80 Figure 1This ongoing project will enable our team to identify those requiring blood tests and potential treatment. As we continue we expect an increase in patient numbers to our CNS clinics. One major limitation is limited access to regional hospital laboratory results. Another limitation is staff being available to review files, responses to letters and chasing blood tests or results.Public Health England (2017). Hepatitis C in the UK – 2017 Report.Working to Eliminate Hepatitis C as a Major Public Health Threat. London: PHE.Thursz M. (2017). The fight against hepatitis C has not yet been won: here’s what we have to do. Huffington Post;10 August 2017.Vine LJ et al. Diagnosis and management of hepatitis C. British Journal of Hospital Medicine;2015;76:11, 625–630.World Health Organization (2016). Combating Hepatitis B and C to Reach Elimination by 2030. Geneva: WHO.

16.
Gut ; 71(Suppl 3):A83, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064233

ABSTRACT

P69 Table 1Demographic and transplant data for all 14 prioritised patientsPatient/Sex Centre Age at registration (yrs) Primary liver disease Registered prior to Prioritisation Indication of Prioritization LT Waiting time on prioritised tier/Time on list prior to prioritisation 1/M 1 0 CDG Yes Acute decompensation with presence of encephalopathy Yes/LLS 5/27 2/M 2 1 Cryptogenic Cirrhosis Yes CLD with nodular lesions s/o HCC Yes/LLS 16/48 3/F 1 15 AILD Yes Chronic rejection Yes/whole liver 3/4 4/M 2 0 Biliary Atresia Yes PTLD/HAT/Sepsis Yes/LLS 14/71 5/F 2 4 IFALD No Coagulopathy with active bleeding/Renal impairment Yes/LLS 15/820 6/F 2 0 Biliary Atresia Yes Acute decompensation due to portal hypertension Yes/LLS 37/405 7/M 2 10 NSC Yes Decompensated chronic liver disease/Renal impairment Yes/reduced R lobe 4/7 8/M 3 8 PFIC3 Yes Acute decompensation of Chronic liver disease Yes/LLS 6/51 9/F 1 0 Other (Hepatoblastoma) Intestinal Tx prioritized Acute decompensation of Chronic liver disease Yes/LLS 11/ 10/F 2 0 Biliary atresia Yes Decompensated Chronic Liver Disease with Severe Coagulopathy Yes/LLS 10/120 11/M 1 0 Biliary atresia (Hepatoblastoma) Yes Acute decompensation of Chronic liver disease Yes/LLS 9/4 12/F 3 0 Biliary atresia Yes Acute decompensation of Chronic liver disease Yes/LLS 12/323 13/F 1 17 Hepatic Artery thrombosis Yes Hepatic Artery thrombosis Yes/whole liver 2/ 14/F 2 0 Biliary atresia Yes Acute decompensation of Chronic liver disease Suspended 12/65 PFIC3;Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis type 3, LT;Liver transplantation, HCC;Hepatocellular Carcinoma NSC;Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis, CDG;Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, AILD;Autoimmune Liver Disease, IFALD;Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease,PTLD;Center 1-Kings;Center2-Birmingham;Center3-Leeds.ConclusionThe national paediatric prioritization tier, introduced during the COVID19 pandemic, has been a pivotal initiative for the UK paediatric LT program, showcasing national collaboration. All patients underwent a LT successfully within a short time from prioritization with 100% patient and graft survival. The intention is to maintain this prioritized paediatric tier beyond the pandemic.

17.
Gut ; 71(Suppl 3):A57-A59, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064226

ABSTRACT

P35 Figure 1ConclusionsUnplanned hospital attendances are common amongst cirrhotic patients, particularly those from lower socioeconomic groups. Over half of patients with at least one liver-related admission died during the follow up period, with two thirds of these deaths occurring during or shortly after discharge.The data shows the true burden of liver disease and highlights the need for improved in-patient care for this vulnerable patient group.

18.
Gut ; 71(Suppl 3):A24, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064222

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unique challenges. Beyond the direct COVID-related mortality in those with liver disease, we sought to determine the effect of lockdown on people with liver disease in Scotland. The effect of lockdown on those with alcohol-related disease is of interest;and whether there were associated implications for a change in alcohol intake and consequent presentations with decompensated disease.We performed a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to seven Scottish hospitals with a history of liver disease between 1 April and 30 April 2020 (n=111) and compared across the same time in 2017, 2018 and 2019 (n=348). We also repeated an intermediate assessment based on a single centre to examine for delayed effects between 1 April and 31 July 2020 (n=89) compared to the same time period in 2017–2019 (n=284). Information was collected on patient demographics, disease characteristics, length of stay and inpatient mortality.We found that results and outcomes for patients admitted in 2020 were similar to those in previous years in terms of morbidity, mortality, and length of stay. In the Scotland-wide cohort: admission UKELD (United Kingdom Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) (56 (52–60) vs 54 (50–60);p<0.01), inpatient mortality ((10.9% vs 8.6%);p=0.499) and length of stay (8 days (4–15) vs 7 days (4–13);p=0.140). In the single centre cohort: admission UKELD (57 (53–62) vs 57 (53–60);p=0.246), inpatient mortality ((13.7% vs 10.1%;p=0.373) and length of stay (7 days (4–14) vs 7 days (3.5–14);p=0.525)).In the Scotland wide cohort, patients admitted in 2020 had a significantly higher serum sodium at presentation (137 (132–140) vs 135 (130–138) p<0.01)This group also had lower rates of HCC (1.8% vs 7.2%;p=0.04)In the single centre cohort, patients admitted in 2020 had lower rates of hepatic encephalopathy (21.3% vs 35.9%;p=0.01) and were less likely to be admitted due to decompensation (70.8% vs 82.7%;p=0.01). This assessment of immediate and medium-term lockdown impacts on those with chronic liver disease suggested a minimal effect on the presentation of decompensated liver disease to secondary care in terms of patient outcomes.

19.
Gut ; 71(11):2363-2364, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064217
20.
Frontline Gastroenterology ; 13(Suppl 1):A19, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064207

ABSTRACT

G6 Table 1 Strongly disagree (%) Disagree (%) Neutral (%) Agree (%) Strongly agree (%) Pandemic related questions Felt safe at work 30.4 30.4 39.1 Negative affect on mental health 13 17.4 47.8 17.4 4.3 Improved working environment 8.7 30.4 43.5 13 4.3 Online teaching useful 13 4.3 82.6 Online teaching attendance >50% 21.7 39.1 21.7 8.7 8.7 More online teaching PGHAN services preserved 13 13 30.4 43.5 Supported by team 17.4 17.4 47.8 17.4 Endoscopy Reduced endoscopy lists 8.7 13 26.1 52.2 OGD confident 4.3 4.3 13 21.7 56.5 Colonoscopy confident 56.5 13 17.4 13 G6 Table 2 2016 (%) 2018 (%) 2021 (%) Minimum 70% working in PGHAN 68 57 65.2 <33% out of hours 78 73.9 Complex safeguarding involvement 82.6 Home parenteral nutrition clinic attended 47 Transition clinic attend d 56.5 Attendance to trainees’ day 14/7/21 65.2 >2 endoscopy lists per month 67% 68%

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL