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1.
Texila International Journal of Public Health ; 9(4), 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1841776

ABSTRACT

This is a critical appraisal of a manuscript outlining additional indicators used in the United States to augment traditional disease surveillance tools. The article went through the peer-review process. Therefore, it may be considered as objective and unbiased. The structure of the article is coherent, and it was published in a journal for digital medicine, health, and health care in the internet age. The article has contributed to the literature and provides a basis for strengthening existing surveillance systems to improve public health outcomes. However, it is suggested that whenever new indicators are being developed, their essential components must be fully defined.

2.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9):5733, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1841401

ABSTRACT

Background. We aimed to assess the validity of the Mat-O-Covid Job Exposure Matrix (JEM) on SARS-CoV-2 using compensation data from the French National Health Insurance compensation system for occupational-related COVID-19. Methods. Deidentified compensation data for occupational COVID-19 in France were obtained between August 2020 and August 2021. The case acceptance was considered as the reference. Mat-O-Covid is an expert-based French JEM on workplace exposure to SARS-CoV-2. Bi- and multivariable models were used to study the association between the exposure assessed by Mat-O-Covid and the reference, as well as the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. Results. In the 1140 cases included, there was a close association between the Mat-O-Covid index and the reference (p < 0.0001). The overall predictivity was good, with an AUC of 0.78 and an optimal threshold at 13 per thousand. Using Youden’s J statistic resulted in 0.67 sensitivity and 0.87 specificity. Both positive and negative likelihood ratios were significant: 4.9 [2.4–6.4] and 0.4 [0.3–0.4], respectively. Discussion. It was possible to assess Mat-O-Covid’s validity using data from the national compensation system for occupational COVID-19. Though further studies are needed, Mat-O-Covid exposure assessment appears to be accurate enough to be used in research.

3.
Museum Worlds: Advances in Research ; 9(1):82-91, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1841282

ABSTRACT

Written as notes from the field, this article explores the overlaps between researcher development and the idea of academic resilience within the museum and heritage studies community. During a climate of uncertainty and rapid change, it argues that alongside the academic literature, positive psychology methods transfer well into the researcher development space. Methods involved informal email conversations with museum and heritage practitioners united by how COVID-19 and border lockdown presented new opportunities to connect, share ideas, and rethink. Presented as short narratives, these findings show how researchers and practitioners in northern Europe, the United Kingdom and Canada share similar concerns to those in the southern hemisphere about climate change, equity, well-being, resilience, and sustainability. These narratives highlight the importance of encouraging critical engagement, finding ways to traverse time zones that build international networks and provide leadership opportunities for researchers at any level.

4.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(1):165-168, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1841237

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To test whether distortions in the age distribution of deaths can track pandemic activity.

5.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(1):169-178, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1841236

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To assess the association between individual-level adherence to social-distancing and personal hygiene behaviors recommended by public health experts and subsequent risk of COVID-19 diagnosis in the United States. Methods. Data are from waves 7 through 26 (June 10, 2020-April 26, 2021) of the Understanding America Study COVID-19 survey. We used Cox models to assess the relationship between engaging in behaviors considered high risk and risk of COVID-19 diagnosis. Results. Individuals engaging in behaviors indicating lack of adherence to social-distancing guidelines, especially those related to large gatherings or public interactions, had a significantly higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis than did those who did not engage in these behaviors. Each additional risk behavior was associated with a 9% higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09;95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05, 1.13). Results were similar after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and local infection rates. Conclusions. Personal mitigation behaviors appear to influence the risk of COVID-19, even in the presence of social factors related to infection risk.

6.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(1):29-33, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1841235

ABSTRACT

Minority populations have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and disparities have been noted in vaccine uptake. In the state of Arkansas, health equity strike teams (HESTs) were deployed to address vaccine disparities. A total of 13 470 vaccinations were administered by HESTs to 10 047 eligible people at 45 events. Among these individuals, 5645 (56.2%) were African American, 2547 (25.3%) were White, and 1068 (10.6%) were Hispanic. Vaccination efforts must specifically target populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

7.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(1):144-153, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1841232

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe associations between neighborhood racial and economic segregation and violence during the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
BMC Health Services Research ; 21(765), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1840970

ABSTRACT

Background: Broadband access has been highlighted as a national policy priority to improve access to care in rural communities. Objective To determine whether broadband internet availability was associated with telemedicine adoption among a rural patient population in western Tennessee.

9.
International Negotiation ; 27(2):264-291, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1840698

ABSTRACT

Grounded in peacebuilding and negotiation literature, we propose a Three Conditions Model that promotes collaborative engagement and can help advance sustainable solutions to complex problems – domestic and international – through self-governing agreements based on the following three conditions: (1) inclusion of, (2) common understanding among, and (3) trust between all prime actors. Collectively, these conditions make the management of complex problems, and of the conflicts arising from them, more effective and sustainable. Using the coronavirus pandemic as an example, we briefly illustrate the nature of complex problems and self-governing agreements, address the inclusion-trust dilemma that mars many negotiations and assess the utility of each condition to address the coronavirus response in the United States more effectively. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Negotiation is the property of Brill Academic Publishers and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Circulation ; 145(15):1123-1139, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1840691

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute myocarditis (AM) is thought to be a rare cardiovascular complication of COVID-19, although minimal data are available beyond case reports. We aim to report the prevalence, baseline characteristics, in-hospital management, and outcomes for patients with COVID-19-associated AM on the basis of a retrospective cohort from 23 hospitals in the United States and Europe.

11.
Industrial Management & Data Systems ; 122(5):1306-1332, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1840181

ABSTRACT

Purpose>With the increasing use of crowdfunding platforms in raising funds, it has become an important and oft-researched topic to analyze the critical factors associated with successful or failed crowdfunding. However, as a major subject of crowdfunding, medical crowdfunding has received much less scholarly attention. The purpose of this paper is to explore how contingency factors combine and casually connect in determining the success or failure of medical crowdfunding projects based on signal theory.Design/methodology/approach>The paper adopts the crisp-set qualitative comparative analysis to analyze the causal configurations of 200 projects posted on a leading medical crowdfunding platform in China “Tencent Donation.” Five anecdotal conditions that could have an impact on the outcome of medical crowdfunding campions were identified. Three relate to the project (funding duration, number of images and number of updates) and two relate to the funding participants (type of suffer and type of fund-raiser).Findings>The results show that diversified configurations of the aforementioned conditions are found (six configurations for successful medical crowdfunding projects and four configurations for failed ones).Originality/value>Despite the fact that there are a considerably large number of medical crowdfunding projects, relatively few researches have been conducted to investigate configurational paths to medical crowdfunding success and failure. It is found that there are certain combinations of conditions that are clearly superior to other configurations in explaining the observed outcomes.

12.
Journal of Public Health Management & Practice ; 28(3):292-298, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1840116

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate changes in public mask-wearing behavior in response to public health policies during COVID-19. Design: Panel of observed public mask-wearing. Setting: Counts of adult behavior in Marion County, Indiana, between November 15, 2020, and May 31, 2021. Determinants of Interest: (1) Removal of state masking requirement;(2) introduction of the National Strategy for the COVID-19 Response and Pandemic Preparedness;(3) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation that vaccinated individuals did not need to wear masks in public;and (4) COVID-19 vaccine availability. Outcome: Percent observed with correct mask-wearing. Analyses: Fixed-effects models estimated the association between policies and mask-wearing. Results: Ending Indiana's mask requirement was not associated with changes in correct mask-wearing. The CDC's recommendation was associated with a decrease of 12.3 percentage points in correct mask-wearing (95% CI, -23.47 to -1.05;P =.032). Conclusions: Behavior encouraged by local mask requirements appeared to be resilient to changes in state policy. CDC recommendations appeared influential.

13.
Professional Case Management ; 27(3):154-157, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1840113
14.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy ; 79(10):720-722, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1840036
15.
Health Equity ; 6(1):367-374, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1840025

ABSTRACT

Objective: To understand how the public discourse around food assistance and social responsibility evolved during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic by analyzing news coverage. Methods: We conducted an ethnographic content analysis of news articles and photographs about food insecurity or food assistance published by U.S. newspapers and wire services between December 1, 2019, and November 30, 2020. We analyzed a random sample of 241 articles and 223 photographs to assess how they depicted food assistance programs, the program participants, and whether they included cues for deservingness. Results: Before the pandemic, news about food assistance was dominated by stories about abuse and fraud. Once COVID-19 began, news coverage contained cues known to engender beliefs about the deservingness of people receiving assistance. During the pandemic, news also highlighted misconceptions about food assistance programs, called for policy changes to reduce logistical barriers, and described the plight of families and other “people like us” in need of food assistance. Discussion: News coverage during the pandemic cued audience empathy, highlighted the logistical strains faced by food assistance programs, and elevated values of government accountability. The narrative about society's obligation to care for communities in need can be transferred to other safety net programs that protect the public's health. Health Equity Implications: As the pandemic evolves, public health leaders can maintain the narrative about the importance of food assistance and expand the characteristics of this narrative to challenge well-entrenched, but false, narratives about those who need help.

16.
Health Equity ; 6(1):356-366, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1840024

ABSTRACT

Background: Place is a social determinant of health, as recently evidenced by COVID-19. Previous literature surrounding health disparities in the United States often fails to acknowledge the role of structural racism on place-based health disparities for historically marginalized communities (i.e., Black and African American communities, Hispanic/Latinx communities, Indigenous communities [i.e., First Nations, Native American, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian], and Pacific Islanders). This narrative review summarizes the intersection between structural racism and place as contributors to COVID-19 health disparities. Methods: This narrative review accounts for the unique place-based health care experiences influenced by structural racism, including health systems and services and physical environment. We searched online databases for peer-reviewed and governmental sources, published in English between 2000 and 2021, related to place-based U.S. health inequities in historically marginalized communities. We then narrate the link between the historical trajectory of structural racism and current COVID-19 health outcomes for historically marginalized communities. Results: Structural racism has infrequently been named as a contributor to place as a social determinant of health. This narrative review details how place is intricately intertwined with the results of structural racism, focusing on one's access to health systems and services and physical environment, including the outdoor air and drinking water. The role of place, health disparities, and structural racism has been starkly displayed during the COVID-19 pandemic, where historically marginalized communities have been subject to greater rates of COVID-19 incidence and mortality. Conclusion: As COVID-19 becomes endemic, it is crucial to understand how place-based inequities and structural racism contributed to the COVID-19 racial disparities in incidence and mortality. Addressing structurally racist place-based health inequities through anti-racist policy strategies is one way to move the United States toward achieving health equity.

17.
Journal of Museum Education ; 46(4):406-416, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1839846

ABSTRACT

The dual pandemic that started in 2020, COVID-19 and events revealing systemic racism, has increased awareness about violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities across the United States. This article describes how the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, a "museum without walls," collaborated with a group of educators to co-create video resources for teaching and learning AAPI histories and stories.

18.
Journal of Museum Education ; 47(1):113-124, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1839845

ABSTRACT

Trauma infiltrates all of society - including museums. For guests, the trauma may lie in the context of the visit or what they bring with them from their everyday lives. Staff can develop trauma through daily interaction with stressful content or secondary trauma through interaction with traumatized guests. During the COVID19 pandemic, trauma also developed from workplace issues regarding personal health safety and job security. This is a case study about how one museum educated itself about the presence and impact of trauma through exploration of a framework developed by the Trauma Responsive Educational Practices (TREP) Project. We present results of a staff-wide evaluation around initial implementation of the framework. Results show staff found the framework to be relevant and useful, but they need more support adapting it to the unique environment of museums. It also triggered memories of personal trauma in some staff, requiring a rethinking about how to implement it.

19.
Journal of Museum Education ; 46(4):481-492, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1839844

ABSTRACT

This article considers the inequities of digital museum programming during the COVID-19 pandemic and their alignment with audiences historically excluded from access to STEAM learning opportunities, primarily communities with low incomes and people of color. We employ an ecosystem framework to assert the critical role museums can play within communities to address these issues during and after pandemic circumstances. We describe a case study from a STEAM-oriented children's museum where staff provided out-of-school-time learning through reciprocal and collaborative community partnerships.

20.
Journal of Museum Education ; 46(4):519-530, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1839843

ABSTRACT

With the onset of the pandemic, Philbrook Museum of Art's education department grappled with loss of staff, suspension of long-standing programs, and an unclear sense of identity and purpose. As the larger institution sought to continue a transformation towards more equitable and culturally resonant practices, we undertook a process of self-reflection that revealed how much previous program commitments had hindered the pace of change. Through choosing to leave behind inherited departmental structures and committing more time to relationships with colleagues and partners, we found a more sustainable, equitable, and impactful trajectory for our work.

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