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1.
Education Research International ; 2022, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1832667

ABSTRACT

An e-service-learning teleexercise program, 5% Healthier, provided a remote experiential learning opportunity for students and a supervised exercise program for participants during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study retrospectively evaluated whether students achieved course learning outcomes and improved their ability to work in teleexercise and if the intervention was a successful exercise program for participants. Supervised by graduate students, undergraduate student coaches provided 10 weeks of personalized exercise coaching to participants. Pre- and postperformance assessments were collected on participants, and anonymous surveys were administered to students and participants. Twenty-two undergraduate students and nine graduate students participated. Students’ perceptions of the e-service-learning experience were generally positive, and almost all felt it allowed them to meet the course learning outcomes and improved their ability to work in teleexercise. Seventy-three participants completed the exercise program and showed improvements in all performance assessments (body composition (weight, BMI), shoulder and hamstring flexibility, upper and lower body muscular endurance, and overall function (p<0.01)). Participants rated the program highly and agreed that 5% Healthier helped them gain fitness (93%). The 5% Healthier e-service-learning program is a successful model for experiential learning in exercise physiology, and the teleexercise program improved participants’ performance outcomes.

2.
Annual conference of the Computational Social Science Society of the Americas, CSSSA 2021 ; : 98-111, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1826200

ABSTRACT

This research uses the COVID-19 Trends and Impact Survey provided by Carnegie Mellon University in partnership with Facebook to study predictors and drivers of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Virginia’s adult population. It estimates vaccine hesitancy rates at a zip code level in Virginia by applying multilevel statistical models. Our analysis identifies the demographic features of zip codes that are associated with vaccine hesitancy. It also examines the drivers of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy across Virginia. Results show the presence of a larger percentage of Black and White population and a lower percentage of Hispanic population are predictors of higher vaccine hesitancy within a zip code in Virginia. Among these drivers, the biggest is system distrust, where individuals either do not trust the government or believe that the vaccine is not efficacious. Finally, it provides policy insights and tailored outreach programs for improving COVID-19 vaccination acceptability in different regions in Virginia. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

3.
HEM/ONC Today ; 23(5):24, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824128

ABSTRACT

"COVID-19 misinformation is a significant public health concern, and more vulnerable groups may be at increased risk of believing such types of misinformation - something their health care providers should be aware of and possibly address in relation to patients' concerns about the pandemic and how it relates to their treatment," Jeanine P.D. Guidry, PhD, assistant professor at Robertson School of Media and Culture and director of the media and health lab at Virginia Commonwealth University, told Healio ;HemOnc Today. Because patients undergoing treatment are particularly vulnerable to misinformation, the cancer care community must address patients' concerns on how the pandemic relates to their course of treatment, the researchers wrote. [...]we have no information on how the volunteers were selected - through online patient communities, online advertisement or other means - which means we cannot calculate the response rate.

4.
The Journal of Southern History ; 88(1):73-110, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1812809

ABSTRACT

Cholera victims appeared healthy one moment but then quickly experienced agonizing symptoms: vomiting and voluminous diarrhea filled with blood plasma and flakes of the small intestine that gave the stool a characteristic rice-water appearance. No one understood, in those days before germ theory, that the bacteria Vibrio cholerae caused the illness, that one contracted it by consuming sewage-contaminated water or food, and that the bacteria released one of nature's deadliest toxins into the small intestine. Mild cases resulted when an individual ingested relatively few bacteria and when an individual's relatively high level of stomach acid killed significant quantities of the germs before they reached the small intestine. Pandemics-whether influenza in 1918 or COVID-19 in 2020-have generally had higher case fatality rates in the United States among recent immigrants, African Americans, and Indigenous populations.6 As has happened in the more recent past and as is happening today, a pandemic and injustice marched in lockstep through the American South in 1832.7 In midsummer of that deadly year, cholera penetrated the American South.

5.
The Journal of Hospital Ethics ; 8(1):43-54, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1801218

ABSTRACT

Biographies of Lead Presenters, ICCEC 2021 (alphabetical by presenter) Marleen Bakker Biography: Dr. Marleen Bakker is trained as a pulmonologist after a PhD on lung cancer research, and has been working as a staff member at the department of Pulmonary Diseases of the Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands since 2002. Since 2004 that department started a cooperation with the department of Pulmonary Diseases of Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, and since 2014 with the department of Pulmonary Diseases of Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town. Since the COVID-19 outbreak Dr Botes became actively involved in pandemic preparedness and management research, writing the section about the pandemic's impact on human rights in the Country Report on governmental leadership, governance and the implementation of measures to combat COVID-19 in South Africa. Dr Botes is also serving on the panel of experts of the Academy of Sciences of South Africa (ASSAf) to investigate, advise and write consensus reports on the Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (ELSI) related to Advanced Therapies such as gene therapy and stem cell research. Having started her career in private practice, representing London hospitals in their clinical negligence claims, she moved into academic law and has been the module convener for Medical Law and Ethics at Hertfordshire Law School for a number of years.

6.
Institute of Transportation Engineers. ITE Journal ; 92(4):14-16, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1790690

ABSTRACT

The ITE Student Leadership Summits are discussed. Among other things, San Jose State University (SJSU) hosted the virtual 2022 Western District Student Leadership Summit from Jan 28-30, 2022. This event brought students from various chapters including members from the US states of Hawaii, Washington, Oregon, and California. Over the span of 3 days, the SJSU ITE Student Chapter focused on the themes of interpersonal development and finding ways to be more aware of personal care, equity in transportation, and exposure to different technical work in the industry.

7.
Planning for Higher Education ; 50(2):51-53, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1790147

ABSTRACT

Smith notes that 80 percent of what is considered learning happens outside the formal classroom. [...]the case for personal learning is justified because emphasis is placed on the nontraditional path to education-along with the road of hard knocks. [...]Smith contends that personal learning is so credible that individuals are often unaware it occurs. [...]The Capstone-Michael's Story is the culminating account of persistence and grit over the course of a lifetime of ups and downs.

8.
2021 IEEE Global Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Internet of Things, GCAIoT 2021 ; : 51-56, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1769582

ABSTRACT

The communication revolution that happened in the last ten years has increased the use of technology in the transportation world. Intelligent Transportation Systems wish to predict how many buses are needed in a transit system. With the pandemic effect that the world has faced since early 2020, it is essential to study the impact of the pandemic on the transit system. This paper proposes the leverage of Internet of Things (IoT) devices to predict the number of bus ridership before and during the pandemic. We compare the collected data from Kobe city, Hyogo, Japan, with data gathered from a college city in Virginia, USA. Our goal is to show the effect of the pandemic on ridership through the year 2020 in two different countries. The ultimate goal is to help transit system managers predict how many buses are needed if another pandemic hits. © 2021 IEEE.

9.
The Journal of Government Financial Management ; 70(1):56-57, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1749578

ABSTRACT

Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) and Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS) establish measures of the sufficiency and appropriateness (quantity and quality) of audit evidence to reduce audit risk to an acceptably low level. [...]these standards rarely dictate or limit how audit evidence is obtained. Typical Reasons for a Site Visit Site visit objectives vary, but most are conducted to perform transaction cycle walkthroughs;inspect facilities and observe physical controls (e.g., system security) or other control activities;attend physical inventory counts;and test property. Existence testing through video or photography parallels the reliability of an on-site presence when specific controls can ensure accuracy, such as time-stamp photographs, digital camera date displays, or framing an artifact (e.g., that day's newspaper) sent by the auditors for use in the test.

10.
2021 Winter Simulation Conference, WSC 2021 ; 2021-December, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1746022

ABSTRACT

Contact tracing (CT) is an important and effective intervention strategy for controlling an epidemic. Its role becomes critical when pharmaceutical interventions are unavailable. CT is resource intensive, and multiple protocols are possible, therefore the ability to evaluate strategies is important. We describe a high-performance, agent-based simulation model for studying CT during an ongoing pandemic. This work was motivated by the COVID-19 pandemic, however framework and design are generic and can be applied in other settings. This work extends our HPC-oriented ABM framework EpiHiper to efficiently represent contact tracing. The main contributions are: (i) Extension of EpiHiper to represent realistic CT processes. (ii) Realistic case study using the VA network motivated by our collaboration with the Virginia Department of Health. © 2021 IEEE.

11.
2021 Winter Simulation Conference, WSC 2021 ; 2021-December, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1746015

ABSTRACT

Tracking the COVID-19 pandemic has been a major challenge for policy makers. Although several efforts are ongoing for accurate forecasting of cases, deaths, and hospitalization at various resolutions, few have been attempted for college campuses despite their potential to become COVID-19 hot-spots. In this paper, we present a real-time effort towards weekly forecasting of campus-level cases during the fall semester for four universities in Virginia, United States. We discuss the challenges related to data curation. A causal model is employed for forecasting with one free time-varying parameter, calibrated against case data. The model is then run forward in time to obtain multiple forecasts. We retrospectively evaluate the performance and, while forecast quality suffers during the campus reopening phase, the model makes reasonable forecasts as the fall semester progresses. We provide sensitivity analysis for the several model parameters. In addition, the forecasts are provided weekly to various state and local agencies. © 2021 IEEE.

12.
Journal of Advanced Transportation ; 2022, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1741726

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and antipandemic policies have significantly impacted highway transportation. Many studies have been conducted to quantify these impacts. However, quantitative analysis of the impacts on province-wide traffic in developing countries, such as China, is still inadequate. This paper tried to fill this gap by proposing equations to quantify the traffic variations of overall province-wide traffic and to analyze the intercity bus traffic variation and intercity bus usage, applying the K-means cluster method to conduct the analysis of traffic reductions in regions with different levels of economic development, and using the hypothesis testing for traffic recovery analysis. It is found that passenger vehicle traffic and truck traffic dropped by 59.67% and 68.19% during the outbreak, respectively. The intercity bus traffic on highways declined by 59.8% to 98.6%, and the intercity bus usage dropped by 55.6% on average. For traffic reductions in different regions, the higher the GDP per capita was, the more the traffic was affected by the pandemic. In regions with lower GDP per capita, traffic variations were minor. It is also found that the passenger vehicle traffic went through four stages in 99 days: the Decline Stage, Rapid Recovery Stage, Slow Recovery Stage, and Normal Stage, while truck traffic only experienced the Decline Stage, Rapid Recovery Stage, and Normal Stage and took 51 days to recover to the Normal Stage. In the Rapid Recovery Stage, the recovery rates were 15.6% and 12.9% per week for passenger vehicle traffic and truck traffic, respectively, and the recovery rate was only 2.1% for passenger vehicle traffic in the Slow Recovery Stage. Despite the recovery of traffic volumes, neither passenger-kilometers nor tonne-kilometers of freight in 2020 reached the same level as in 2019. These findings help the understanding of the pandemic’s impacts on highway traffic for researchers and can provide valuable references for decision-makers to develop antipandemic policies.

13.
Carbon & Climate Law Review : CCLR ; 15(4):361-364, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1732990

ABSTRACT

Climate Change and Maritime Boundaries: Legal Consequences of Sea Level Rise Published by Cambridge University Press, 2021 304 pp., €100 (Hardback). “Is carbon dioxide removal ‘mitigation of climate change’?” 30 Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law (3/2021), pp. 327-335. “International Cooperation on Climate Change Mitigation: The Role of Climate Clubs”, 30 European Energy and Environmental Law Review (5/2021), pp. 195-218. Foreign investor protections, stabilization clauses and fossil-fuelled power generation in developing countries”, 30 Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law (3/2021), pp.313-326.

14.
SpringerBriefs Public Health ; : 73-99, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1718543

ABSTRACT

This study used the CDC dataset (January 1, 2020–April, 17, 2021) on Provisional COVID-19 Deaths by County, and Race and Hispanic Origin, with the available data from 760 counties within 50 States and DC. Data collection on COVID-19 deaths complied with the 2013 National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties. The Kruskal-Wallis Test compared the median COVID-19 deaths of Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics among the six types of urban-rural counties (large central metro, large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan, and noncore) nationwide, in order to determine whether their population means were significantly different in COVID-19 deaths. This statistical analysis also was administered for 14 States with the largest Black and Hispanic populations (Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia) and for each of the top five (5) States of residence for the US Black population (Texas, Florida, Georgia, New York, and California). Our findings suggested that that there were significant differences in median COVID-19 deaths of Blacks and Hispanics among the six types of urban and rural counties nationwide, as well as in the 14 States and 5 States, and that the pairwise post hoc Dunn test (p < 0.05, adjusted using the Bonferroni correction) recognized several significant pairs of urban-rural counties (p < 0.05), which were fundamentally different in affecting COVID-19 deaths among Blacks, and Hispanics nationwide, as well as in the 14 States and in the 5 States.

15.
Archaeology International ; 24(1):99-133, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1708284

ABSTRACT

This article charts a particular journey of discovery - that of 'heritage questing with Virginia Woolf. We explore how, against the backdrop of COVID-19, the Master's in Cultural Heritage Studies (MACHS) adopted and adapted Virginia Woolf as an efficacious 'ancestor figure' around which staff and students were able to grasp, engage with, articulate and try to understand the extraordinary experiences and challenges faced throughout the academic year. Woolf emerged as the shared conduit and portal by which MACHS in 'diaspora' could imaginatively connect with, collectively tap into and add new layers to the Institute of Archaeology (IoA)'s 'spirit of place' in Bloomsbury. In what follows, our article draws on a co-ethnography of these experiences which, in turn, we juxtapose alongside Virginia Woolf s own literary insights. Writ large, our journey sees us critically reflect upon attempts to navigate the unknown currents and trajectories of living, teaching and learning in times of coronavirus within which Woolf emerged as a lighthouse of sorts. Writ larger still, we see our quest as a means to grasp the 'new pedagogies of the pandemic' that materialised as an outcome of the impacts and experiences of coronavirus. Ultimately these were also seized upon as a means of taking forward the shared promise of fulfilment, in terms of shaping such quests into liveable presents and better futures as well as adding new layers to the IoA's stratigraphy.

16.
Phi Delta Kappan ; 103(5):62-63, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1706769

ABSTRACT

Education became a major issue in the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election, when Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin clashed over how much say parents should have in their children’s education. Youngkin’s victory, fueled in part by parent outrage over school curricula, could lead other candidates to stoke fear and outrage over schools to score political points. Maria Ferguson discusses the power of schools to divide society and considers what lessons schools should take from the COVID-19 crisis. © 2022 by Phi Delta Kappa International.

17.
Journal of American Folklore ; 134(534):375-377,537, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1696245

ABSTRACT

According to the Black Lives Matter website, "in 2013, three radical Black organizers-Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi-created a Black-centered political will and movement building project called #BlackLivesMatter. Two of the many slogans dominant in the protests that followed were "Say Her Name" and "Protect Black Womxn!" African American Policy Forum (AAPF) and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies used the phrase "Say Her Name" as a hashtag (#SayHerName) in December 2014 to bring "awareness to the often invisible names and stories of Black women and girls who have been victimized by racist police violence, and provides support to their families." To lift up their stories, and illuminate police violence against Black women, we need to know who they are, how they lived, and why they suffered at the hands of police.2 The pieces in this issue give flesh to Black folks of all genders;they share their experiences, emotions, and creativity in their voices, thus "lifting up their stories" Each contribution offers insights into the personal experiences of Black folk.

18.
2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference, ASEE 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1696060

ABSTRACT

In this evidence-based practice paper, we present results from surveys of students in two CS courses offered in Spring 2020 at Virginia Tech, a large, public research university: a programming-intensive CS2-level course and an upper division theory course, Formal Languages and Automata. Spring 2020 was extraordinary as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Universities in the US and across the globe switched to a complete online delivery mode instead of the traditional face-to-face mode. This was challenging to both educators and students, as the transition took place on short notice in the middle of the Spring 2020 semester. We were interested to know those course components students perceived as most beneficial to their learning, before and then after the online transition, and their mode preferences for each regarding online vs. Face-to-Face. By comparing student reactions across courses, we gain insights on which components are easily adapted to online delivery, and which require further innovation. COVID was unfortunate, but gave a rare opportunity to compare students' reflections on F2F instruction with online instructional materials for half of a semester vs. entirely online delivery of the same course during the second half. Although the instruction provided during the second half of the semester may not be the same as what would have been provided had the course been designed as a fully online course from the beginning, it did provide the opportunity for us to acquire insights for future instruction. Results indicated that some course components were perceived to be more useful either before or after the transition, and preferences were not the same for the two courses. Furthermore, to determine what course components need further improvement before transitioning to fully online mode, we computed a logistic regression model. Results indicated that for each course, different course components both before and after the transition significantly affected students' preference of course modality. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2021

19.
Journal of American Folklore ; 134(534):418-429,538, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1695995

ABSTRACT

Due to evolving racial dynamics on the US national stage in 2020, the William & Mary Theatre production of HANDS UP: 7 PLAYWRIGHTS, 7 TESTAMENTS pivoted to an interactive conversation featuring select directors and actors. In this essay, I employ autocritography as a strategy to reflect on the process from proposal to production to pivot to conversation. I also consider the role of Black performances of trauma in a time of crisis, and the need for more equitable and inclusive educational theater environments for Black actors.

20.
Contemporary Pediatrics ; 39(1):14-15, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1695763

ABSTRACT

Based on its quasi-predictable genetic markers, we urgently promoted vaccination, stocked up on Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-waived test kits, and prescribed antiviral medications for patients and their families to protect our communities and reduce the potential for spread. When discussing COVID-19 infection with families, pediatricians will often include a caution for the infrequent possibility for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), but probably the most common and actionable concern is cardiac, especially for adolescent athletes. Since June 2020, there have also been several reported cases of MIS in adults3). Email them to llevine@mjhlifesciences.com О For references and additional resources, go to ContemporaryPediatrics.com/ crossover-symptoms-COVID-19influenza Russell Libby is founder and president of the Virginia Pediatric Group in Fairfax, Virginia;assistant clinical professor of pediatrics atthe University of Virginia and George Washington University schools of medicine;a board member of the Physicians Foundation;and a member of the Contemporary Pediatrics® Editorial Advisory Board.

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