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1.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 65:2, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2045537

ABSTRACT

This article reports on the inclusion of wild-caught shrimp in the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) program to help Louisiana's shrimp industry during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result of a quick Sea Grant mobilization, $50 million in cash from USDA was infused into the shrimping industry, and 7.6 million pounds of Louisiana shrimp were taken out of inventory and distributed nationwide.

2.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 65:2, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2044964

ABSTRACT

This article presents an overview of the growth of the Louisiana nursery industry and the labour challenges the industry is facing. Labour issues in the nursery industry are not easily solved, considering the nature and seasonality of employment and competition from other industries. Despite the benefits associated with the H-2A guest worker program, particularly securing seasonal workers in times of need, which allows nurseries to cope with labour shortages, few Louisiana nurseries rely on the H-2A program. Moreover, prolonged impact of the COVID-19 pandemic also raises concerns on ways the industry needs may change and how it will affect securing labour.

3.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:3, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1929404

ABSTRACT

LSU AgCenter family and consumer sciences nutrition agents across Louisiana taught nutrition education classes to adults and children face-to-face in their communities and in schools. But because of the COVID-19 pandemic, in-person classes were halted in March 2020. To continue their outreach, the agents from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed), the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Flavors of Health program worked together to develop a virtual nutrition education program. To reach the specific audiences, the LSU AgCenter agents collaborated with community partners, such as local libraries, Head Start, WIC clinics and schools, to enroll participants for classes. Promotional videos featuring SNAP-Ed and EFNEP nutrition agents were produced to explain the benefits of attending the classes and how to register. Over time, EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition agents and educators embraced virtual programming and were able to recruit and deliver nutrition education programs from their homes or offices. The benefit to offering virtual nutrition education classes was that AgCenter agents could remain visible in their community and still connect with their audiences while remaining safe during the pandemic.

4.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:3, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1929396

ABSTRACT

This article describes how the LSU AgCenter agents with the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program led a surprise "Snack Pack Cooking Class" for students at North Highlands Elementary School and Oak Park Microsociety Elementary School in Shreveport, Louisiana, in April and May of 2021. The AgCenter agents provided each student with a box of ingredients, a paper cookbook with recipes and handouts, and a paper chef's hat. Students prepared turkey ranch wraps, which served as the after-school snack, and an under-the-sea snack mix, which the students took home. The classes allowed for a hands-on, interactive experience, while adhering to COVID-19 guidelines. The students had to identify each food's category using the MyPlate guideline for nutrition. Of the 52 students, 50 reported that they tried a new vegetable because of the class. These 2 schools have participated in EFNEP nutrition lessons during after-school activities during this past school year hosted by the Fully Devoted Developers of Children Winners' Circle, a nonprofit group in Shreveport that partners with the AgCenter. This group provided funds for the classes and purchased picnic tables for the 2 schools.

5.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:3, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1918553

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic presented many challenges for the LSU AgCenter 4-H program. To meet social distancing guidelines and ensure the safety of youth and agents, many of programming efforts transitioned to a virtual format. However, the need remained for hands-on learning opportunities. 4-H programming is driven by the motto "learn by doing", and it was paramount that agents provide purposeful and engaging activities. The 4-H Seed-of-the-Month Club is a project club that emerged to meet that need. Agents created a nine-month seed subscription made available to youth across the region beginning in August 2020. With this project, participating youth were provided seeds of various plants, including pine seedlings, rainbow carrots, easter egg radishes, lettuce, green beans, okra, squash and coneflowers. Agents used the LSU AgCenter Louisiana planting guide to select the seeds to offer each month. In the future, agents and youth alike have expressed an interest in continuing to provide horticulture opportunities through the delivery mode of the Seed-of-the-Month Club. Participants were asked to provide top choices for their gardens by receiving carrots, lettuce and green bean seeds for the future.

6.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):7-8, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904585

ABSTRACT

Various extension programs across the country offer educational and practical opportunities for new and beginning farmers. In recent years, Louisiana has experienced a boom in horticultural farm businesses managed by new and beginning farmers. Though access to land and credit are often cited as two primary challenges that new and beginning farmers face, access to market channels and business management skills are also key to building sustainable farm businesses. Moreover, strong social networks where new and beginning farmers can freely exchange ideas, network, share resources, and provide trainings are essential to the development of new and beginning farmers. This research focuses primarily on horticulture farmers' perceptions of business management skills and risk management. We used data collected as a part of the evaluation program for the Grow Louisiana Beginning Farmer Training Program (Grow Louisiana), an extension program offered by the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. Grow Louisiana is a partnership of academic, cooperative extension, and nonprofit organizations to train fruit and vegetable farmers with less than 10 years of experience on small to mid-size farms in Louisiana. Focused on the southeastern region of Louisiana, the program emphasizes sustainable agricultural practices and local food systems. The year-long program offers participants training in whole-farm planning and risk management based on the following principles: (i) sustainable agriculture and business practices, (ii) resource optimization, (iii) objective decision making, and (iv) efficient work practices. The program trained 16 farmers per year and apart from educational training, promotes networking and mentoring among farmers across the state. This study used a mixed methods approach to analyze program evaluation data from the 3-year program (2018-2021). The first year the program was offered in person, the second year moved to a hybrid model when measures were taken to address participant safety due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the third year was completed mostly online. Data were collected pre- and postprogram through needs assessments, interviews, and focus groups with participants. Findings add to existing literature and highlight the importance of business and marketing planning in the development and training of new and beginning farmers. Moreover, the study provides useful information for extension practices considering the variety of methods of delivery by year (i.e., in person, hybrid, online).

7.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):3-4, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904534

ABSTRACT

To address food insecurity, community-based food pantries typically distribute food to area residents using a prefilled bag/box of items (traditional method), or by allowing clients to select items (client-choice method). Prior efforts have found client-choice pantries are often preferred by clients, allowing them more control and dignity over their food choices. However, limited research exists examining barriers to client-choice conversion that pantries may face. Many pantries continue to follow the traditional model. This is especially true in Arkansas, which frequently ranks high in the nation in food-insecure households. The Arkansas Foodbank (AFB) serves as the state's largest nongovernmental provider of food aid, working with over 400 pantries. Despite efforts by the AFB to promote client-choice conversion, in 2020 only 13% of Arkansas pantries offered client-choice. To identify perceived barriers to client-choice conversion, we conducted a mixed-methods survey sent to 366 Arkansas pantry managers during spring 2021. The survey featured questions concerning the feasibility of and potential barriers to offering the client-choice option and had a response rate of 36%. Following grounded theory, a thematic analysis approach was used to code and analyze responses to the open-ended, qualitative survey questions. Preliminary results uncovered five primary themes and six sub-themes, indicating perceived barriers to client-choice conversion. These included concerns related to pantry space and location (37%), volunteer and staffing needs (35%), lack of awareness concerning client-choice options (28%), COVID-19 concerns (27%), and perceived client greed and client distrust (12%). Our preliminary findings suggest food pantry stakeholders may need additional outreach and education concerning the various ways that the client-choice method can be implemented. Our results have important implications for those involved in distributing food aid to food-insecure households.

8.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):1-2, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904450

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the operations of many farm and food businesses across Louisiana. Producers had to adapt to changes or closures of market outlets, including farmers markets, farm-to-school programs, and restaurants. Using data collected from an online survey, this research examines pre- and post-pandemic marketing channels and challenges faced by food producers.

9.
Journal of Communication in Healthcare ; 15(1):22-26, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1890695

ABSTRACT

Background: During the pandemic, Mount Pleasant, Texas became a hotspot for Covid-19 cases in the Hispanic community employed by a local meat packing plant and many other industries. An important consideration for rural communities is the language barrier and lack of easily accessible Spanish information explaining Covid-19. In addition, rapidly changing discoveries about the virus and subsequent vaccines creates a sense of confusion within this population already burdened with difficulty understanding health information leading to even more confusion about prevention, treatment and vaccine acceptance.

10.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:1, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1888299

ABSTRACT

This article briefly describes a series of extension materials created by LSU AgCenter and Louisiana Sea Grant to assist different sectors of the community to respond to public health concerns associated with COVID-19. The materials created included a series of fact sheets on a variety of issues, including food delivery and take-out, fishing safety information and seafood processing plants. In addition, a series of six posters was developed to create awareness of social distancing among store employees and customers. Two fact sheets were created for the seafood industry. "Fishing Safety and Information During a Public Health Emergency" highlights the health of people working on the boats, the proper use of disinfectants, and considerations when fishers sell their catch directly to consumers. The other fact sheet is "Public Health Emergency Response for Seafood Processing Plants During COVID-19," which provides guidance on the risks associated for processing plants during the pandemic, how to identify high-risk areas, and how to control and prevent the transmission of the virus among employees and visitors. The goal is to minimize person-to-person contact in the plant and during processing. To help create awareness on the control and prevention of the transmission of COVID-19, graphics and videos are available on the LSU AgCenter website for sharing through social media.

11.
Research Series Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station ; 680:13-18, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1871631

ABSTRACT

The Soybean Science Challenge (SSC) continues to support Arkansas STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) educational goals, is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and engages junior high and high school students in active learning and the co-creation of knowledge through support of classroom-based lessons and applied student research. The SSC educates and engages junior high and high school science students and teachers in 'real-world' Arkansas specific soybean science education through original NGSS aligned curriculum in 7E and Gathering Reasoning and Communicating (GRC)-3D format and a continuum of educational methods which include: teacher workshops, online and virtual education, NGSS aligned mini-lessons for science classrooms, community gardens, personal mentoring, student-led research and corresponding award recognition, and partnerships with state and national educators, agencies, and the popular media. The COVID-19 global pandemic altered the educational landscape in 2020 and continues to do so. The new educational environment has seen an increase in virtual classrooms, online courses, and interactions with Zoom © . The Soybean Science Challenge (SSC), by nature of its existing design and methodology, was and is amid these methods by launching online Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aligned Gathering Reasoning and Communicating (GRC)-3D and 7E lesson plans for teachers, adding an online course, adding NGSS aligned mini-lesson videos for the science classroom, and adding virtual field trips to the list on the Soybean Science Challenge website. The Challenge also sponsored the virtual Arkansas Science Teacher Association Conference, and the SSC Coordinator taught virtual workshops on bringing agriculturally based lessons into science classrooms. The Soybean Science Challenge virtually judged participants at both the regional and state level, and SSC added a junior level award at regional science fairs. Through the SSC, teachers now have access to a plethora of educational instructions that bring real-world agricultural critical thinking both into the classroom and the homes of students.

12.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:1, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1871191

ABSTRACT

This article presents preliminary results from an ongoing survey (Louisiana, USA) asking participants how long they have been gardening, how much time they spent in the garden before and during the stay-at-home orders, and how much time they expect to spend in the garden after the COVID-19 pandemic.

13.
Journal of Museum Education ; 46(4):519-530, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1839843

ABSTRACT

With the onset of the pandemic, Philbrook Museum of Art's education department grappled with loss of staff, suspension of long-standing programs, and an unclear sense of identity and purpose. As the larger institution sought to continue a transformation towards more equitable and culturally resonant practices, we undertook a process of self-reflection that revealed how much previous program commitments had hindered the pace of change. Through choosing to leave behind inherited departmental structures and committing more time to relationships with colleagues and partners, we found a more sustainable, equitable, and impactful trajectory for our work.

14.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ; 71(7):255-263, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1812722

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic? Protection against COVID-19 after 2 doses of mRNA vaccine wanes, but little is known about durability of protection after 3 doses. What is added by this report? Vaccine effectiveness (VE) against COVID-19-associated emergency department/urgent care (ED/UC) visits and hospitalizations was higher after the third dose than after the second dose but waned with time since vaccination. During the Omicron-predominant period, VE against COVID-19-associated ED/UC visits and hospitalizations was 87% and 91%, respectively, during the 2 months after a third dose and decreased to 66% and 78% by the fourth month after a third dose. Protection against hospitalizations exceeded that against ED/UC visits. What are the implications for public health practice? All eligible persons should remain up to date with recommended COVID-19 vaccinations to best protect against COVID-19-associated hospitalizations and ED/UC visits.

15.
Western Economics Forum ; 19(1):51-57, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1755797

ABSTRACT

This study looks at the farm-level impacts of COVID-19 on six case study model operations created by local Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Risk Management Specialists. Texas High Plains producers faced many new uncertainties with the arrival of COVID19. Significant supply chain disruptions, reductions in consumer demand and decreases in travel negatively affected agricultural operations. In addition, efforts taken to stem contagion lessened the amount of food consumed away from home, and restrictions on movement sharply reduced gasoline usage, and with it demand for grain ethanol. Elevated cases among livestock processing facilities disrupted normal business practices and increased costs. In fact, early in the pandemic the Texas High Plains region was considered a COVID-19 "hot spot" as many area processing plants faced reduced workforces and slower production times due to high numbers of positive cases.

16.
Journal of Risk Research ; 24(3/4):416-431, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1747026

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 in the United States has resulted in over 11.2 million cases and over 240 thousand deaths. COVID-19 has affected the society in unprecedented way with its socioeconomic impact yet to be determined. This study aimed at assessing the vulnerability of the US at the county-level to COVID-19 using the pandemic data from January to June of the year 2020. The study considered the following critical factors: population density, elderly population, racial/ethnic minority population, diabetics, income, and smoking adults. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to validate the independence of the factors. Spatial correlations between the COVID-19 occurrence and the factors were examined using Jaccard similarity analysis, which revealed relatively high correlation. A vulnerability to COVID-19 map with a five-level Likert scale was created using Logistic Regression Analysis in ArcGIS. The map showed close agreement in seven representative states, which were selected based on COVID-19 cases including NY, CA, FL, TX, OH, NC, and MT with R2 values between 0.684 and 0.731 with Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) values between ..0.033 and ..0.057. Furthermore, vulnerability levels from 'High' to 'Very High' were obtained for the top ten counties with the highest COVID-19 cases with residual values less than or equal to 0.04. The method and resulted vulnerability map can aid in COVID-19 response planning, prevention programs and devising strategies for controlling COVID-19 and similar pandemics in the future.

17.
Journal of Applied Arts & Health ; 12(3):353-366, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1736533

ABSTRACT

This note from the field outlines how an integrated arts in health department within a hospital created clinical and non-clinical art experiences for patients and providers during COVID-19. Working with a multi-disciplinary team, the Center for Performing Arts Medicine at Houston Methodist established creative arts therapy and arts integration programmes targeting patient and provider experiences during COVID-19. Emphasis is placed on how programmes respond to both physical health and emotional well-being through accessible, appropriate art experiences. This article outlines those strategies and highlights various entry points for arts experiences in a hospital experience during a pandemic.

18.
Preventing Chronic Disease ; 18(1), 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1726662

ABSTRACT

The objective of this essay is to describe the COVID-19 Comprehensive Response Plan for the Marshallese Community in northwest Arkansas. Although no REACH funding is spent on COVID-19 activities, the community-engaged capacity developed through REACH implementation has provided a strong foundation for the COVID-19 Comprehensive Response Plan. Marshallese in northwest Arkansas have experienced disproportionate rates of COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations, and deaths. These high rates may be due in part to the high incidence of type 2 diabetes in the Marshallese community, a condition that increases the risk of complications and death from COVID-19. Community-based partners funded through a CDC REACH award have built a strong collaborative foundation to address chronic diseases and associated risk factors in the Marshallese community. We have leveraged that collaboration to address COVID-19 disparities through the development and implementation of a COVID-19 Comprehensive Response Plan based on CDC recommendations. Our Comprehensive Response Plan includes increased testing, contact tracing, enhanced case management, and health education. Simultaneously, partners have shifted to remote delivery of health education efforts as we continue to address type 2 diabetes in the Marshallese community. The COVID-19 Comprehensive Response Plan demonstrates how CBPR infrastructure created by the REACH program can be leveraged to reduce health disparities and implement critical CDC recommendations beyond individual grant awards.

19.
Journal of Agricultural Education ; 62(4):67-80, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1726522

ABSTRACT

School based agricultural education has long been associated with teacher stress, burnout, and attrition, and the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has likely exacerbated these conditions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the differences in Arkansas SBAE teachers' stress, coping strategies, and job satisfaction based on teaching environment, and demographic variables during the pandemic. Results showed that respondents experienced fatigue, frustration, worrying, forgetfulness, and impatience, and that these symptoms of stress along with related sources of pressure were negatively correlated with job satisfaction. However, teaching environment resulting from the pandemic was not shown to predict job satisfaction. Nonetheless, results showed that teaching is stressful regardless of situation, and respondents who utilized coping strategies were found to have higher levels of job satisfaction. Therefore, we recommend that administrators work with teachers to develop coping strategies for dealing with stress.

20.
Western Economics Forum ; 19(1):9-20, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1628017

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 caused meat processing plant shutdowns, increasing public concern regarding the current processing system. We identify numerous issues and limitations to provide the basis for a discussion about the challenges of increasing local and smallscale processing. These include labor, inspection availability, rendering services, capital, waste management/environmental, water, liability and throughput consistency issues. The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry received $10 million in grants for the Food Supply Stability Plan for Oklahoma meat processors. This work examines the potential impact of an increased number of local meat processors, and the incentives created by Oklahoma to encourage such actions.

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