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1.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199555

ABSTRACT

IntroductionWorking from home during the COVID-19 pandemic has been associated both with physical inactivity and musculoskeletal pain. However, it has not been examined whether physical activity and sedentary behavior are underlying mechanisms in the association between working from home and musculoskeletal pain. Therefore, we examined their mediating role in this association. MethodsData were used from 24 questionnaire rounds of the Lifelines COVID-19 cohort (March 2020-January 2022). Longitudinal information on work situation (location, home, hybrid), physical activity, sedentary behavior, and musculoskeletal pain was collected among 28,586 workers. Analysis of physical activity/sedentary behavior as mediators of the association between working from home and musculoskeletal pain was performed using multilevel structural equation modeling. ResultsHome workers more often had pain in the upper back [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95%-confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.34] and arm, neck, and/or shoulder (ANS) (OR = 1.32, 95%-CI = 1.19-1.47) than location workers. Furthermore, home workers were more often sedentary for >9 h per work day than location workers (OR = 2.82, 95%-CI = 2.56-3.09), and being more sedentary was associated with musculoskeletal pain (upper back: OR = 1.17, 95%-CI = 1.06-1.30;ANS: OR = 1.25, 95%-CI = 1.16-1.34). Corresponding indirect effects were OR = 1.18 (95%-CI = 1.04-1.33) and OR = 1.26 (95%-CI = 1.12-1.35). No indirect effect was found for physical activity. Similar indirect effects were observed for hybrid workers. ConclusionHome and hybrid workers were more likely to have pain in the upper musculoskeletal system during the COVID-19 pandemic than location workers, which was partly mediated by increased sedentary behavior, but not by reduced physical activity. Measures to reduce sedentary time in home workers may contribute to preventing musculoskeletal pain.

2.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199512

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic imposed a heavy workload on nurses with more frequent night shifts, which led to higher levels of insomnia, depression, and anxiety among nurses. The study aimed to describe the symptom-symptom interaction of depression, anxiety, and insomnia among nurses and to evaluate the impact of night shifts on mental distress via a network model. MethodsWe recruited 4,188 nurses from six hospitals in December 2020. We used the Insomnia Severity Index, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale-7 to assess insomnia, depression, and anxiety, respectively. We used the gaussian graphical model to estimate the network. Index expected influence and bridge expected influence was adapted to identify the central and bridge symptoms within the network. We assessed the impact of night shifts on mental distress and compared the network structure based on COVID-19 frontline experience. ResultsThe prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia was 59, 46, and 55%, respectively. Nurses with night shifts were at a higher risk for the three mental disorders. "Sleep maintenance" was the central symptom. "Fatigue," "Motor," "Restlessness," and "Feeling afraid" were bridge symptoms. Night shifts were strongly associated with sleep onset trouble. COVID-19 frontline experience did not affect the network structure. Conclusion"Sleep maintenance," "Fatigue," "Motor," and "Restlessness" were important in maintaining the symptom network of anxiety, depression, and insomnia in nurses. Further interventions should prioritize these symptoms.

3.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199483

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveFor a safe and healthy workplace in the health sector, the International Labor Organization (ILO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) jointly developed HealthWISE, an international technical tool that helps health workers (HWs) to identify workplace hazards and apply low-cost solutions. This study sought to gather experiences and lessons from a Chinese pilot hospital for the scale-up application of HealthWISE. MethodsA qualitative study was undertaken at a Chinese public hospital with a >= 5-year application of HealthWISE through in-depth interviews with targeted HWs who participated in the Training-of-Trainer (TOT) workshops, and observations were gathered using evidence from photos and publications, then, thematic analysis was formulated. ResultsDriven by motivation, the participants learned from the HealthWISE TOT workshop alongside the favorite and worst parts of it. Positive changes and results of occupational health for HWs occurred after the workshop, the participants trained others and planned to implement HealthWISE within their responsibility. During the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Hospital acted the approaches of protecting the health, safety and well-being of HWs with significant results. Further suggestions on workshop and HealthWISE implementing as well as the national policies were collected. The study indicated the Hospital's experience of leadership and participation, supporting and facilitating, system establishment, and culture creation. The suggestion included keeping staff engaged under a positive safety and health culture, promoting recognition of HealthWISE among public health institutions nationwide, developing online courses for medical colleges, focusing on the alignment among various law systems, and adopting measures under the principle of the hierarchy of occupational hazards controls. ConclusionThis study has demonstrated the systematic improvement of occupational health for HWs by HealthWISE implementation in the Chinese hospital. The valuable experiences and lessons derived here can be shared with other hospitals in China and beyond, especially under the unprecedented challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, to achieve the goals of safety, health, and well-being for HWs by building a resilient health system.

4.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199480

ABSTRACT

BackgroundVaccine hesitancy (VH) is prevalent in conflict zones due to a lack of essential resources and knowledge, thereby escalating the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) cases in these territories. This has resulted in a higher incidence of cases from exposure to a single COVID-19 positive case and further burdens the health care system of conflict zones which are already on the brink of collapsing. AimThis narrative review aims to determine VH to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine in five conflict zones that include Somalia, Yemen, Palestine, Syria, and Afghanistan. MethodologyA Boolean search was carried out in MEDLINE-PubMed from inception till 6 June 2022. The search was performed by using the following keywords: "(SARS-CoV-2 OR covid OR covid 19) AND (vaccine hesitancy OR covid vaccine acceptance OR intention to vaccinate) AND (Syria OR Yemen OR Palestine OR Afghanistan OR Somalia"). The full text of all relevant articles in English along with their supplementary material was extracted. ResultsAll the included studies reported at least 30% or more increase in vaccine hesitancy among conflict settings. VH was mostly due to a lack of available resources, lack of appropriate knowledge, and believing misleading rumors about the vaccine. DiscussionConsidering the massive amount of reluctance among people residing in conflict zones, the need to take effective measures against VH is undoubtedly apparent. This can be accomplished by carrying out mass vaccinations by the governments and proper health education through raising the public awareness regarding vaccines, thereby eliminating rumors that exacerbate the fear of adverse effects. ConclusionThe approach described in this article to combat VH can be implemented to increase vaccination rates and significantly alleviate R-0 across the globe.

5.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199462

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe United States is home to 10.5 million undocumented immigrants, of which 5 out of 10 are Mexican or Central American. Their immigration status is an obstacle to secure employment that provides labor benefits such as sick leave and health insurance. Living through the global pandemic in the U.S. had a negative impact on this vulnerable population's mental and physical health. They avoided seeking primary or hospital care fearful that they were undocumented and uninsured. The services provided by the Ventanillas de Salud (VDS) "Health Windows" mitigated this pandemic's negative impact and have become an important source to support and increase access to health services among the immigrant community. MethodsDe-identified data from a database system called the Continuous Information System and Health Reports of Mexicans in the United States (SICRESAL-MX) to perform this secondary analysis. The descriptive analysis describes socio-demographic, epidemiological, and situational characteristics of COVID-19. ResultsBetween January 2020 and July 2021, the VDS and UMS provided 11.5 million individual services to just over 4.3 million people. The main health conditions are overweight and obesity, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol and glucose levels. Between March 2020 to July 2021 a total of 2,481,834 specific services related to COVID-19 were offered. DiscussionThe Mexican migrant community in the United States is in a vulnerable situation, largely due to its immigration status which limits their access to health and human services, including primary health care services. Many of them have suffered from chronic diseases since before the pandemic, generating difficulties in monitoring the ailments and exacerbating their conditions.

6.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199445

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of contracting coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in their workplace. Infection prevention guidelines and standard operating procedures were introduced to reduce risk of exposure and prevent transmission. Safe practices during interaction with patients with COVID-19 are crucial for infection prevention and control (IPC). This study aimed to assess HCWs' compliance to IPC and to determine its association with sociodemographic and organizational factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted between March and April 2021 at public healthcare facilities in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. HCWs who were involved with COVID-19-related works were invited to participate in the online survey. The questionnaire was adapted from the World Health Organization (WHO) Interim Guidance: WHO Risk Assessment and Management of Exposure of Healthcare Workers in the Context of COVID-19. Respondents were categorized as compliant or non-compliant to IPC. A total of 600 HCWs involved in COVID-19-related works participated in the survey. Most of them (63.7%) were compliant to IPC as they responded to all items as "always, as recommended" during interaction with patients with COVID-19. The multivariate analysis showed that non-compliance was significantly associated with working in the emergency department (AOR = 3.16;95% CI = 1.07-9.31), working as laboratory personnel (AOR = 15.13;95% CI = 1.36-168.44), health attendant (AOR = 4.42;95% CI = 1.74-11.24), and others (AOR = 3.63;95% CI = 1.1-12.01), as well as work experience of more than 10 years (AOR = 4.71;95% CI = 1.28-17.27). The odds of non-compliance among respondents without adequate new norms and personal protective equipment training were 2.02 (95% CI = 1.08-3.81) more than those with adequate training. Although most of the respondents complied to IPC protocols, compliance status differed according to department, work category, and years of service. Ensuring adequate training that will hopefully lead to behavioral change is crucial to prevent breach in IPC and thus minimize the risk of exposure to and transmission of COVID-19 in healthcare facilities.

7.
Frontiers in Psychiatry ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199431

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to heightened anxiety, distress, and burnout among healthcare workers and faculty in academic medicine. Penn Medicine launched Coping First Aid (CFA) in March 2020 in response to the pandemic. Informed by Psychological First Aid principles and therapeutic micro skills, CFA was designed as a tele-mental healthcare service for health system employees and their families delivered by trained lay volunteer coaches under the supervision of licensed mental health clinicians. We present an overview of the model, feasibility and utilization data, and preliminary implementation and effectiveness outcomes based on cross sectional coach (n = 22) and client (n = 57) self-report surveys with a subset of program users in the first year. A total of 44 individuals completed training and were certified to coach. Over the first 24 months of the program, 513 sessions occurred with 273 clients (119 sessions were no-shows or canceled). Follow-up appointments were recommended in 52.6% (n = 270) of sessions and 21.2% (n = 109) of clients were referred for professional mental health care. Client survey respondents reported CFA was helpful;60% were very or extremely satisfied, and 74% indicated they would recommend the program. Our preliminary findings suggest that CFA was feasible to implement and most clients found the service beneficial. CFA provides a model for rapidly developing and scaling mental health supports during and beyond the pandemic.

8.
Frontiers in Psychiatry ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199421

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has put healthcare workers under important psychological pressure. Concerns have been raised regarding the mental health and psychological status of healthcare workers and have underlined the need for institutions to develop long-term interventions to support their resilience. The current case study presents the way a large university hospital in Brussels, Belgium, has evolved to deal with this health crisis and support its workers. Initiatives were multiple and complementary, as it was decided to combine different forms of clinical interventions that were developed by psychologists, psychiatrists, and human resources, to an empirical approach including a large survey that permitted to reach a much larger audience (the results of the study have been published previously). We describe the initially proposed measures of psychological support, including the creation of a telephone hotline, the presence of psychologists among teams of dedicated COVID-19 units, discussion groups, and individualized follow-ups, and their consequences on healthcare workers. Second, we address how these initial measures of support were modified to tailor in the best way possible the needs of healthcare workers, using a research action project that used a survey to measure and address the psychological distress of healthcare workers. We explain how, through different objectives (screening of distress, adaptation of initial measures based on reported needs, active reinforcement of individual and collective resilience, reminder of availability of help, and normalization of distress), a research action project can be a form of support and is an effective way for an institution to show its pre-occupation for the mental health of its teams. The current case study highlights how an institution can provide support and the importance of the use of a combined strategy to limit the consequences of a major health crisis on the mental health of its healthcare workers. Improving the resilience of healthcare workers both in the short and long term is of the essence to maintain optimal care of patients.

9.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199202

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, as a crucial public health crisis, has affected our lives in nearly every aspect. Besides its major health threats, COVID-19 brings severe secondary impacts, one of which is the rise of social stigma. Although numerous studies have examined the antecedents and outcomes of COVID-19-related stigma, we still lack a systematic understanding of who is being stigmatized during the COVID-19 pandemic, what exacerbates COVID-19-related stigma, and what impacts COVID-19-related stigma has on victims. Therefore, this review aims to provide a systematic overview of COVID-19-related stigma. With 93 papers conducted with 126,371 individuals in more than 150 countries and territories spanning five continents, we identify three targets that have received the most research: Chinese/Asian people, (suspected) patients and survivors, and healthcare workers. Furthermore, we find that for each stigma target, characteristics of the stigmatized, stigmatizer, and context contribute to COVID-19-related stigma and that this stigma negatively influences victims' health and non-health outcomes. We call for future research to provide a more integrative, balanced, and rigorous picture of COVID-19-related stigma via conducting research on neglected topics (e.g., contextual factors that contribute to stigma toward HCWs) and stigma interventions and using a longitudinal design. In practice, we urge governments and institutions (e.g., ministries of public health, hospitals) to pay close attention to stigma issues and to promote safe and inclusive societies.

10.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199201

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses are in high-pressure, high-load, and high-risk environment for a long time, and their insomnia cannot be ignored. Insomnia not only has a negative impact on the physical and mental health of nurses, but also on the efficiency and quality of nursing work. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the multiple mediating effect of psychological capital, effort-reward ratio, and overcommitment in the relationship between perceived organizational support and insomnia among Chinese nurses. Methods: A cross-sectional study has been carried out in a tertiary grade A hospital in Shandong Province, China from March 2021 to May 2021. The demographic questionnaire, Perceived Organization Support Questionnaire, Psychological Capital Questionnaire, Chinese version Effort-Reward Imbalance, Questionnaire and Athens Insomnia Scale were used for data collection. SPSS PROCESS 3.4 macro program developed by Hayes was used to test the serial multiple mediation. Descriptive analysis, independent-samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson's correlation analyses, ordinary least-squares regression, and the bootstrap method were used for data analysis. Results: 658 valid questionnaires were collected (81.2%). Nurses' perceived organizational support was positively correlated with psychological capital (r = 0.455, p < 0.001), and was significantly negatively correlated with effort-reward ratio (r = -0.318, p < 0.001), overcommitment (r = -0.328, p < 0.001), and insomnia (r = -0.358, p < 0.001);Psychological capital was negatively correlated with effort-reward ratio (r = -0.275, p < 0.001), overcommitment (r = -0.339, p < 0.001), and insomnia (r = -0.402, p < 0.001), respectively;effort-reward ratio and overcommitment were significantly positively correlated with insomnia (r = 0.379, p < 0.001;r = 0.466, p < 0.001), respectively. In the model of perceived organizational support-psychological capital-effort-reward ratio-insomnia, the overall mediating effect was -0.080 (95%CI: -0.109 similar to -0.058), and the mediating effect of psychological capital was -0.050, accounting for 34.30% of the total effect;the mediating effect of effort-reward ratio was -0.024, accounting for 16.49% of the total effect;the chain mediating effect of psychological capital and effort-reward ratio was -0.007, accounting for 4.49% of the total effect. In the model of perceived organizational support-psychological capital-overcommitment-insomnia, the overall mediating effect was -0.085 (95%CI: -0.109 similar to -0.064), and the mediating effect of psychological capital was -0.042, accounting for 28.64% of the total effect;the mediating effect of overcommitment was -0.029, accounting for 19.81% of the total effect;the chain mediating effect of psychological capital and overcommitment was -0.015, accounting for 10.14% of the total effect. Conclusion: Perceived organizational support had direct negative influence on insomnia. Psychological capital and effort-reward ratio/overcommitment acted as chained mediating factor could partially relieve insomnia symptoms related to perceived organizational support. It is suggested to improve the level of organizational support and psychological capital of nurses, and reduce the effort-reward imbalance and overcommitment of nurses, so as to effectively decline and deal with nurses' insomnia.

11.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199170

ABSTRACT

Introduction/contextHealthcare workers (HCWs) play an important role in fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. However, they have been exposed to mixed public responses more significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, which have potentially affected their work and life. AimWe aim to study what public responses toward HCWs existed, how and why such public responses impacted HCW's work engagement and well-being, and how Human Resource (HR) professionals navigate these impacts. These understandings are important for improving HCWs' work and life quality. MethodsWe adopted a mixed approach including both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate how the public responses impact HCWs' work engagement and well-being and how human resource management (HRM) shall intervene. Our quantitative study enables us to collect and analyze a large amount of public responses toward HCWs from the social media platform during the COVID-19 pandemic globally, and uncover the sentiments and topics of these pubic responses via big data and AI technologies. Our qualitative study allows us to understand how and why these public responses impact HCWs' work engagement and well-being via interviews and further identify how HR professionals shall navigate these impacts. ResultsThe sentiment analysis showed that 55.9% of the discussions toward HCWs were positive, 27.2% were neutral, and 16.9% were negative. The topic modeling analysis indicated that the commonly identified topics were related to fear (the negative responses) and gratitude (the positive responses). The interviews with 18 HCWs revealed that HCWs' work engagement and well-being were decreased by negative public responses through experiencing tension or disappointment due to social and physical ostracism, rejection, discrimination, and criticism. On the other hand, positive public responses in terms of encouragement, recognition, and tangible donations increased their work engagement and well-being. The analysis also suggested that occupational calling served as a mechanism that explained why public responses had such impacts on HCWs. The interview results also highlighted the significance of HRM in bridging positive public responses toward HCWs and revealed problems with communication from HRM during the pandemic. This research provides practical implications about how to improve HCWs work engagement and well-being during the pandemic via public and HRM efforts.

12.
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience ; 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2199038

ABSTRACT

Background: Many countries now have relied on the various types of vaccines for the public to control COVID-19 pandemic. The adverse reactions (ARs) after vaccination may affect the vaccination coverage and confidence. However, whether the sleep quality was associated with the ARs after vaccination remains unclear. Methods: We designed a longitudinal paired study within a hospital setting. We collected data about the side effects within 7 days after two-dose schedule vaccination among healthcare workers (HCWs). All HCWs were asked to complete sleep survey indexed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) before vaccination and after one-month following up. We then explored the relationship between the sleep quality before or after vaccination and the occurrence of ARs. Results: A total of 345 HCWs were recruited to receive COVID-19vaccination. The sleep quality became poorer after vaccination. All local and systemic reactions were mild or moderate in severity (32.46%) and no serious adverse event was reported. Binary logistic regression showed participants with poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) than good sleep quality (PSQI ≤5) before two dose vaccination respectively exhibited 1.515 and 1.107 times risk of ARs after each vaccination (both p < 0.001). Conclusions: There is an apparently complex bidirectional relationship between sleep quality and COVID-19 vaccination adverse effects. Poor sleep quality significantly increases the risk of mild ARs after vaccination, while vaccination may cause a temporary decline in sleep quality.

13.
Work ; 30, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2198548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses have been affected by stress, developing many related consequences during the health emergency caused by the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. It is essential for healthcare organizations to protect their human resources because there is a strong correlation between the health status of healthcare workers and the quality of care provided. OBJECTIVE(S): The aim of the study was to measure the perception of the organizational health level of the workplace among COVID-19 nurses (i.e. nurses who directly dealt with COVID-19 countermeasures) as an influence on work quality and work-related stress. METHOD(S): A cross-sectional study was carried out by administering the Nursing Questionnaire on Organizational Health (QISO) to nurses in contact with COVID-19 patients. The search period ranged between August and September 2021 with nurses who work and/or worked in Lazio. RESULT(S): 123 questionnaires were collected. The scores with a value below the recommended level (2,6) are: "Comfort of the working environment" (mean = 2,57;SD = 0,66);"Valorization of skills" (mean = 2,40;SD = 0,62);"Openness to innovation" (mean = 2,46;SD = 0,77);"Satisfaction with top management" (mean = 2,48;SD = 0,81);the inverse scale "Fatigue" (mean = 2,94;SD = 0,55). CONCLUSION(S): Management of healthcare organizations should define action strategies to promote and increase organizational well-being and reduce work-related stress risk factors. Some action strategies that could be used include improving the elements of the work environment to make it more comfortable for workers;strengthening and improving communication;improving the relationship between nurses and senior management;and establishing a team of experts for psychological assistance.

14.
Journal of Environmental Engineering (Japan) ; 87(802):785-796, 2022.
Article in English, Japanese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2198415

ABSTRACT

The authors conducted an online survey in Japan in March 2019 (N=2,684) to gather feedback from workers who commute to their offices and work with several people in a corporate environment. However, considering the COVID-19 pandemic changed our workstyle, a second survey (n=490) was conducted in December 2020 for workers whose offices remained mostly unchanged since the last survey to compare data from both surveys for the same respondents and investigate the changes in the value of office spaces. The result suggested that the survey respondents were influenced by the changes in workstyles and attitudes in the telework experience. © 2022 Architectural Institute of Japan. All rights reserved.

15.
Rodo Anzen Eisei Kenkyu = Journal of Occupational Safety and Health ; 14(2), 2021.
Article in Japanese | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2198348

ABSTRACT

We investigated the associations between the attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine and the motivation to receive the COVID-19 vaccine among Japanese workers using an anonymous questionnaire. This study was conducted during the period of September through December 2020. The analyzed subjects were 2,061 workers. Regarding "motivation to get vaccinated against COVID-19,” the subjects selected responses from a 9-point scale from "definitely agree” to "definitely disagree.” A total of 67.2% ("definitely agree” to "somewhat agree”) workers had the motivation to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Factor analyses revealed four factors regarding their attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine: "protecting the lives and health of oneself and others,” "agreement to pay for the vaccine,” "leading a relaxed live,” and "perceived safety.” As a result of multiple regression analysis, "protecting the lives and health of oneself and others,” "agreement to pay for the vaccine,” and "perceived safety” were significantly associated with "motivation to get vaccinated against COVID-19.” Males were more motivated to receive the vaccine than females. By considering these three factors and gender differences, workers' motivation to get vaccinated against COVID-19 will be improved.抄録我が国の労働者の「新型コロナワクチンに対する意識」と「新型コロナワクチンを接種する動機づけ」との関連性を 検討することで,職域における新型コロナワクチン接種の推進方法について探る.2020年9月から12月の間に調査を実施した.対象者は36事業場に勤務する労働者で,解析対象者数は2,061名であった.新型コロナワクチンに対する意識に 関する項目は,ヘルスビリーフモデルを参考にして独自に作成し,因子分析(主因子法,プロマックス回転)を行った.因子分析の結果,「自他の命と健康を守れる」,「費用負担の容認」,「安心して生活ができる」,「安全性への信頼」という 4つの因子が抽出された.「新型コロナワクチン接種への動機づけ」は,「完全に思わない」から「完全に思う」までの9段階で対象者に回答を求め,「やや思う」から「完全に思う」までのワクチン接種に対する肯定的な回答は67.2%であ った.「新型コロナワクチン接種への動機づけ」に関連する因子を探る目的で,重回帰分析を行った.その結果,「自他の 命と健康を守れる」,「費用負担の容認」,「安全性への信頼」という3つの因子が,「新型コロナワクチン接種への動機 づけ」と有意に関連していた.男性は女性よりも新型コロナワクチン接種への動機づけが有意に高かった.これらの心理的な因子や性別の違いを考慮することで,労働者の新型コロナワクチン接種の動機づけを高めることが出来る.

16.
Current Women's Health Reviews ; 19(3):29-31, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2197806

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is probably the biggest international crisis in World-war-2. Health care workers are any country's biggest asset at the time of coronavirus pandemic. A pregnant health care worker involved in patient care may face multiple risks for herself and her foe-tus. This article briefly discusses the problems faced by pregnant health care staff and works out possible solutions for the same. Workplace health protection for herself and her unborn fetus is the right of all pregnant health care workers and a uniform policy ensuring the same is the need of the hour. Copyright © 2023 Bentham Science Publishers.

17.
Revista Brasileira de Ciencias Sociais ; 37(110), 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2197548

ABSTRACT

Community Health Workers (CHW) are street-level bureaucrats who play a key role in the implementation of Primary Health Care (PHC). Their function involves establishing a bond with the families assisted by this health service, which allows knowing the reality of the territory and the vulnerabilities of the population. This article aims to analyze the configuration of CHW interactions in PHC implementation, focusing on the consequences caused by recent changes in this policy and by the Covid-19 Pandemic. An ethnography was conducted in a PHC Health Unit in the city of Porto Alegre. During four months, we observed the work of six CHW, analyzing their main activities and changes in their routine. Furthermore, six semi-structured interviews were held to compose the analysis. It was possible to identify that the internal organization of the Health Unit is not oriented to community work and to the identification of demands in the territory. The CHW are losing the bond with the population and limiting themselves to bureaucratic functions. The most vulnerable territories and families are the most affected by these changes, as their problems are no longer recognized by this public policy. © 2022,Psicologia Escolar e Educacional.All Rights Reserved.

18.
Revista Brasileira de Saude Ocupacional ; 47(ecov4), 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | GIM | ID: covidwho-2197546

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to evaluate the dimensional validity of the perception scale of the risk of contracting COVID-19 and its association with sociodemographic and occupational factors, as well as with sleep complaints, among healthcare workers. Methods: cross-sectional study, carried out between May and August 2020, involving healthcare workers from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They filled in an online questionnaire regarding their work activities, risk perception of contracting COVID-19, and health behavior. We used factor analysis and binomial and multinomial regression models, adjusted for confounders. Results: 2,996 workers participated. Factor analysis confirmed the scale unidimensionality. Greater chances of high-risk perception were reported by women;caretakers of children/ elderly;those with a work journey of more than 40h/week;workers from primary health care and emergency units, and from general and specialized hospitals. High risk perception was associated with altered sleep duration (OR = 2.39;95%CI = 1.95;2.94), use (OR = 2.08;95%CI = 1.67;2.58) and increased dose of sleep medications (OR = 1.91;95%CI = 1.47;2.48). Conclusion: risk perception was associated with women, caretakers of children/elderly, longer working hours, sleep complaints, and use of sleeping pills. Investigating factors associated with stressful events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, can support actions planning aimed at preventing diseases among healthcare workers.

19.
International Journal of Tourism Policy ; 12(4):372-391, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2197270

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a typology of European regions according to the type, mix and magnitude of human mobilities attracted over the 2008-2018 period, tourists being one of them, but extending to the related movement of different cohorts of migrants. Regional clusters are then assessed in terms of their social performance in domains such as health, material conditions, housing, and labour. Significant associations between regional types and social trends are interpreted in the light of potential factors affecting these outcomes. Results point to the uneven repercussions of housing unaffordability in the fastest growing destination regions, on the polarisation of living conditions in the European 'star destinations' and on the challenge of precarious labour, especially for migrant workers, in established mature destinations. In a stage of reignition of tourism activity after the COVID-19 crisis, these insights are meant to contribute to the recovery debate, informing about key social issues and vulnerabilities which, in specific regional contexts, could have been amplified by the current crisis.

20.
Transitions ; 6(1-2):43-59, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2197218

ABSTRACT

Through a study of a village in Jharkhand, India, the paper maps the migration process of workers due to the structural transformation of the rural area. The nature of transformation in Jharkhand has led to a process of migration as a temporary strategy. This paper illustrates the processes wherein the socio-economic dynamic of the village is reflected in different migration strategies which take the form of identity and assignment-based networks. The paper develops a rudimentary typology of migrant workers to map the differential effects of reverse migration. Reverse migration due to the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in lost skills, lost opportunities and increased competition which has affected workers in different networks and identity groups to varying extents. The breakdown of networks and their revival in the subsequent period led to the solidification of the identity-based networks, which is a reflection of the hierarchy in the village. The paper argues that reverse migration and the subsequent revival of the migration networks are taking on an exclusionary form that affect an already vulnerable population disproportionately.

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