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1.
Fam Pract Manag ; 29(3):4, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824409

ABSTRACT

Making your clinic a place where people want to work has never been more important.

2.
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice ; 22(4):13-21, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824282

ABSTRACT

The research goal is to present the views of Russian students on the relation between the COVID-19 pandemic and their future career opportunities. The research is based on a survey of 138 students studying for their bachelor's degree. Comparing the responses given by students of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th academic years allows the author to estimate the differences in their opinions. The survey illustrates that students ' assessments depend on their academic year. Therefore, students of the junior years lack interest in tackling sustainability issues, which probably appear detached from their lives, while the students of the senior years feel more involved in the current situation. The suggested perspectives of Education for Sustainable Development include (1) motivation towards the involvement of students into professional and general life-supporting activities, (2) further development of the interdisciplinary approach in higher education, and (3) development of distance learning with a strong emphasis on professional use of electronic devices instead of using them primarily as a mean of communication.

3.
New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations (Online) ; 45(2):70-76, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824261

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 is reshaping the domestic workforce. Thousands have lost their jobs throughout this pandemic, and we are seeing a decline in private sector unionism that is unlikely to recover under the current regulatory settings. The implications for democracy are considerable. Using the aviation industry as an example, this article defines industrial democracy, provides an insight into industrial democracy in New Zealand, and argues the case for the regulation of industrial democracy post-Covid-19.

4.
Fam Pract Manag ; 29(3):5-9, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824171

ABSTRACT

These strategies for recruiting and retaining staff can help medical practices survive the “Great Resignation.”

5.
Quality Progress ; 54(12):14-15, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824153

ABSTRACT

EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION The COVID-19 pandemic caused people to yearn to be happier, more fulfilled at work by Henry J. Lindborg Conducting employee surveys to assess quality improvement, strategic alignment, cultural values, and employee satisfaction and engagement showed me that widespread overwork without adequate recognition often coexists with quality aspirations. While teaching a graduate-level class for educators that included a values inventory and detailed time diary, I learned that the burdens of teaching and administration-especially in urban schools-consumed lives, but change was possible for individuals even in failing systems. Ireland, for example, "launched a National Remote Work Strategy in January 2021, intended 'to ensure that remote working is a permanent feature in the Irish workplace' in order to maximize economic, social and environmental benefits.

6.
Midwives ; 25:14-15, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824079

ABSTRACT

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations member states in 2015, provides a blueprint for the wellbeing of people and the planet. Te crises in Ukraine, Syria and Afghanistan demonstrate the challenges of providing high-quality sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn healthcare in areas of confict and mass human migration;women (including midwives), adolescent girls and newborns are especially vulnerable in humanitarian emergencies. Te ICM's Push Campaign aims to accelerate progress on reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, advance sexual and reproductive health rights, address key barriers to women's leadership in the global health workforce, and shift underlying gender norms that undervalue women's rights, lives and work.

8.
Women and Birth ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1819629

ABSTRACT

Background In 2020, in response to major maternity workforce challenges exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Victorian Department of Health implemented a number of workforce maximisation strategies, one of which was employment of undergraduate midwifery students called ‘Registered Undergraduate Student Of Midwifery’ (RUSOM). Aim To evaluate the RUSOM model implemented in a tertiary maternity service in Melbourne, Australia. Methods A cross-sectional online survey was distributed to all RUSOMs and midwives at the study site in August 2021. Findings Twenty of 26 RUSOMs (77%) and 110 of 338 permanent midwives (33%) responded. Both groups considered the model to be a positive workforce strategy that contributed to work readiness of students, and increased confidence and competence to practise. RUSOMS and midwives reported positives for the organisation including improving workload for midwives on the postnatal ward, enhancing quality of care and outcomes for women and babies, and the value of RUSOMs as team members. RUSOMs felt well supported, supervised and clinically and theoretically prepared. Both groups considered RUSOMs were underutilised, and that they could undertake additional duties, and both thought that the RUSOM model should continue. Conclusion The model was highly valued by both RUSOMs and midwives. There was strong agreement that the model should continue and that the list of duties could be expanded. Given these findings, further research should explore the expansion and sustainability of RUSOMs in the maternity workforce.TableStatement of SignificanceProblem or IssueWhile evaluations of undergraduate nursing employment models appear in the literature, there are no evaluations of Registered Undergraduate Student Of Midwifery (RUSOM) employment models available in Australia.What is already knownEvaluations of undergraduate nursing models both in Australia and internationally consistently report benefits of the model for both the students employed and the health services.What this Paper AddsEvidence from this evaluation of an undergraduate midwifery employment model suggest that the model is highly valued and should continue to be supported.

9.
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.) ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1819483

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented health crisis. Pressure on the National Health System has created unique demand particularly in certain services and care units like the critical care units. Objective To learn about the experience of nurses in caring for people with coronavirus in critical care units. Method A qualitative phenomenological study that constitutes the second phase of a mixed methodology project. We conducted interviews with 17 nurses caring for patients affected by COVID-19 in critical care units. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic discourse analysis. Results This article shows the findings around the theme “the value of human resources” which is nuanced through sub-themes “it's not the beds, it's the expert staff”, “shouldering the patient's burden”, and suffering because “they have not cared well”. Discussion Expert nurses have emerged as leading professionals in the care of the critical patient during the COVID-19 pandemic. This leadership is executed from a profile framed in an inclusive philosophy where wisdom, agility and intuition are the key elements underpinning problem identification and solving in a creative way, while adapting to the needs of the patient and healthcare team as they emerge. Conclusions Expert nurses have played an advanced role in the management of care and human resources by exercising effective leadership in the clinical setting. Care has been hampered due to the crisis, which causes nurses moral distress because they have been unable to meet standards of quality and excellence in care. Resumen La pandemia por COVID-19 ha supuesto una crisis sanitaria sin precedentes. La presión asistencial sobre el Sistema Nacional de Salud ha generado escenarios insólitos de demanda especialmente llamativos en algunos servicios o unidades asistenciales como las Unidades de Cuidados Críticos. Objetivo Conocer la experiencia de los profesionales enfermeros referida a la atención de personas infectadas por coronavirus en las Unidades de Cuidados Críticos. Método Estudio cualitativo de carácter fenomenológico que constituye la segunda fase de un proyecto de metodología mixta. Se realizaron entrevistas a 17 enfermeras que prestaron cuidados en Unidades de Cuidados Críticos a pacientes afectados de COVID-19. Las entrevistas fueron audiograbadas, transcritas y analizadas mediante análisis temático del discurso. Resultados En este artículo se muestran los hallazgos en torno al tema «el valor del recurso humano» que matiza su significado a través de los subtemas «no son las camas, es el personal experto», «llevando la carga del paciente» y sufriendo por «no haber cuidado bien». Discusión Los profesionales enfermeros expertos se erigen como profesionales líderes en el cuidado del paciente crítico durante la pandemia por COVID-19. Este liderazgo se ejerce desde un perfil enmarcado en una filosofía integradora donde sabiduría, agilidad e intuición son los elementos clave que dan soporte a la identificación y resolución de problemas de forma creativa adaptándose a las necesidades emergentes de los pacientes y equipo de cuidados. Conclusiones Los profesionales enfermeros expertos han desempeñado un rol avanzado en la gestión de cuidados y de recursos humanos mediante el ejercicio de un liderazgo eficiente en el entorno clínico. Los cuidados se han visto mermados por la situación de crisis, circunstancia que les genera sufrimiento moral por no haber podido cumplir con los estándares de calidad y excelencia en el cuidado.

10.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:318-324, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses are at high risk of experiencing stress when treating patients with COVID-19. The presence of an outbreak could also result in burnout among nurses due to job stress, poor hospital resources for the treatment, and inadequate support from family and friends. All of these related obstacles might be interfered with the intention of nurses to work during a pandemic. AIM: The objective of the study was to identify perceived stress and intention to work during the COVID-19 pandemic among nurses. METHODS: An online-based cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses in Indonesia. There were 238 responses received. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine for data analysis. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation between perceived stress and intention to work (p < 0.001). The regression model showed the variance in the perceived stress with other main predictors. CONCLUSIONS: To maintain an adequate workforce during the pandemic, hospital management should ensure adequate hospital goods supply and deploy retention strategies to retain clinically experienced nurses.

12.
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation ; 12:14-15, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1817121

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In January 2021, Ireland was undergoing the 'Third Wave' of COVID-19, with almost 2,000 persons hospitalised with COVID-19. Over 50% of all COVID-19-related deaths in the EU have occurred in those aged 80 years and older. The same patient cohort is also at high risk sustaining a fragility fracture, leading to an admission to the orthopaedic rehabilitation ward. This study examines a patient group in whom these two scenarios coincided, describing a patient cohort who having sustained a fragility fracture, later contracted COVID-19. This study aims to describe the characteristics and outcomes of orthopaedic rehabilitation patients with COVID-19 and to examine the response of an orthopaedic rehabilitation ward to an outbreak of COVID-19. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study. Data from 26 hospitalised patients aged over 65 years with COVID-19 at an Irish orthopaedic rehabilitation ward was collected. Symptom profile, degree of COVID-19 severity, Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS), Charleston co-morbidity scores, laboratory and radiological data were reviewed. Individual treatment pathways were recorded for each patient. Infection control records were reviewed to examine the response of the ward to an outbreak of COVID-19. Results: Patient mortality rate was 7.7% (n = 2). Median survivor age was 79.5 years (IQR 70-85.5). Mean CFS and Charleston Co-morbidity scores were 4.15;(SD1.6) and 5.08, respectively. The majority of patients (n = 25, 96%) were categorised as mild COVID-19 cases. Delirium was noted in more than 10% of patients (n = 3, 11.6%). One patient (n = 1, 3.8%) required non-invasive ventilation. In those whose disease was classifies as severe (n = 2, 7.7%), intubation/resuscitation were not deemed appropriate and when they deteriorated, comfort measures were taken. The majority of patients (n = 21, 81%) were able to return home upon discharge. Three patients (11.5%) had increased care needs and required long term care to be arranged. Conclusion: An outbreak of COVID-19 requires a multidisciplinary approach with a focus on not only medical management but also clinical workforce management, patient flow, management of access to the wards and information and communications management. The overall outcomes in this group, including mortality and proportion discharged to long term care, were positive when compared to similar cohorts of elderly hospitalised patients with COVID-19. These outcomes support a multidisciplinary model of care.

13.
IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS) ; : 446-451, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1816454

ABSTRACT

The economic impacts of COVID-19 on the United States economy have been devastating for many Americans, but have been especially damaging for Native Americans, tribal governments, and tribal enterprises. On-reservation Native Americans especially have struggled as their governments lose revenue from casinos and other enterprises while attempting to address social and health needs of their citizens. COVID-19 has forced increased adoption of automation in the workplace that will heavily impact Native Americans, due to their increased exposure to the effects of automation in the leisure, transportation, education, and health industries. This paper highlights the unique position that Native Americans and tribal governments face during COVID-19 economic recovery and beyond as well as policy options tribes can implement to mitigate the looming threat of automation on their tribal citizens.

14.
International Journal of Pharmacy Practice ; 30(SUPPL 1):i15-i16, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816116

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Community pharmacy is one of the most accessible sectors in the health service and played a key role in responding to COVID-19 (1). Efforts to tackle COVID-19 have required an immediate response from the community pharmacy workforce. Aim: To examine views and experiences of community pharmacists regarding changes in practice/processes in preparation for and response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A telephone questionnaire was conducted across a geographically stratified sample of community pharmacists in Northern Ireland (NI). Based on the total number of pharmacies (N=528) and an anticipated response rate of 30%, up to 433 pharmacies were to be contacted to achieve a target sample size of n=130 (sampling fraction 24%). The questionnaire sections comprised: (1) measures taken to prevent COVID-19 infection;(2) response to the pandemic, i.e. immediate actions taken, effect on service provision and new/innovative ways of working;(3) pandemic preparedness;(4) communication with GPs and patients;(5) professional knowledge;(6) recovery and future outlook. Data were coded, entered into SPSS v27, and analysed descriptively. Free-text comments were summarised using thematic analysis. Results: One hundred and thirty community pharmacists (175 approached) completed the questionnaire (74% response rate). Pharmacists responded comprehensively to implementing infection control measures, e.g. management of social distancing in the shop (n=125, 96.2%), making adjustments to premises, e.g. barriers/screens (n=124, 95.4%), while maintaining medicines supply (n=130, 100.0%) and advice to patients (n=121, 93.1%). Patient-facing services such as minor ailments and smoking cessation were initially stopped by 115 (88.5%) and 93 (71.5%) pharmacies respectively during the first wave of the pandemic (March-May 2020);by the second wave (Sep-Dec 2020), modified services had resumed in 121 (93.1%) and 104 (79.9%) pharmacies respectively. Newly commissioned services were provided, e.g. emergency supply service (n=121, 93.1%), flu vaccination for healthcare workers (n=101, 77.7%) and volunteer deliveries to vulnerable people (n=71, 54.6%);new initiatives were developed, e.g. measures to flag/assist patients with sensitive issues (n=73, 56.2%). Pharmacies with a business continuity plan increased from 85 (65.4%) pre-pandemic to 101 (77.7%) during the second wave. Free-text responses indicated how pharmacists adapted practice in the front line to reassure and advise the public and maintain essential medicines supply. Pharmacists were least prepared for the increased workload and patients' challenging behaviour, but 126 (96.9%) reported that they felt better prepared during the second wave. Telephone was the main method of communication with patients (n=107, 82.3%) and GPs (n=114, 87.7%). Pharmacists felt they had sufficient training resources available (n=113, 86.9%) to maintain professional knowledge. Pharmacists agreed/strongly agreed that they would be able to re-establish normal services (n=114, 87.7%), were willing to administer COVID-19 vaccines (n=105, 80.7%) and provide COVID-19 testing (n=79, 60.8%) in the future. Conclusion: The high response rate is a strength of the study, but the impact is limited by not including patients or service commissioners. The pharmacy workforce remained accessible and maintained supply of essential medicines and advice to patients throughout the pandemic. Provision of modified and additional services such as vaccination reinforced the clinical and public health role of pharmacy.

16.
Non-conventional in English | WHOIRIS, Grey literature | ID: grc-754201

ABSTRACT

Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, health workforces (HWF) in small countries were faced with huge demands, having to address challenges related to a relatively limited capacity in human resources for health. The need to take small-country specificities into account in planning effective HRH policy responses continues to be highly relevant. The main objectives of the Meeting of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Human Resources for Health in Small Countries of the WHO European Region were to: share information and provide a regional update on policy tools and resources for HWF challenges in a webinar forum open to various WHO networks;understand the impact of the pandemic on HRH planning and development (member-country experiences, and national HWF priorities for the next 2–3 years);discuss the Group’s action plan for 2022–2023 and agree on priorities;and hold on-line consultations with three sub-sets of small countries (island countries, continental countries and city-states). The meeting revealed the importance of collaborative working – both within the health sector and between the health and non-health sectors – to improve health systems in small countries and concluded in proposing areas in which small countries could be supported to this end.

17.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(5):e208, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1815331

ABSTRACT

The absence of any serious plan to tackle workforce shortages is threatening efforts towards improving early cancer diagnosis and overall survival rates in England, a crucial report from the Health and Social Care Committee has warned. None of the ambitions to tackle the pandemic backlog, improve early diagnosis, or ensure the provision of prompt treatment will be possible without addressing gaps in the numbers of clinical oncologists, consultant pathologists, radiologists, and specialist cancer nurses, according to the Committee's independent expert panel. According to the report, the Committee has frequently recommended the overhaul of workforce planning with independent projections of need, but the Government has failed to implement this strategy.

19.
Journal of Manufacturing Systems ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1814779

ABSTRACT

Due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the manufacturing sector has been experiencing unprecedented issues, including severe fluctuation in demand, restrictions on the availability and utilization of the workforce, and governmental regulations. Adopting conventional manufacturing practices and planning approaches under such circumstances cannot be effective and may jeopardize workers’ health and satisfaction, as well as the continuity of businesses. Reconfigurable Manufacturing System (RMS) as a new manufacturing paradigm has demonstrated a promising performance when facing abrupt market or system changes. This paper investigates a joint workforce planning and production scheduling problem during the COVID-19 pandemic by leveraging the adaptability and flexibility of an RMS. In this regard, workers' COVID-19 health risk arising from their allocation, and workers' preferences for flexible working hours are incorporated into the problem. Accordingly, first, novel Mixed-Integer Linear Programming (MILP) and Constraint Programming (CP) models are developed to formulate the problem. Next, exploiting the problem’s intrinsic characteristics, two properties of an optimal solution are identified. By incorporating these properties, the initial MILP and CP models are considerably improved. Afterward, to benefit from the strengths of both improved models, a novel hybrid MILP-CP solution approach is devised. Finally, comprehensive computational experiments are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed models and extract useful managerial insights on the system flexibility.

20.
Journal of Clinical Anesthesia ; 79, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1814643

ABSTRACT

Daily multidisciplinary scheduling committees were held to ensure the optimal number of beds available for surgical patients while prioritizing patient needs based on established criteria. Logistical capability was determined by administrative personnel with an understanding of hospital and community limitations, taking into consideration facility resources (beds, staff, equipment, supplies, etc.) and provider and community safety and well-being. [...]adjustments to our workflow and daily operations may be required as we continue to navigate through this pandemic.Declaration of Competing Interest The authors have no Conflict of Interest with any medical device or company.

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