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1.
Gend Work Organ ; 2020 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1949242

ABSTRACT

This article offers a feminist reflection written as a nocturnal stream of consciousness exposing the embodied, emotional and professional experience of living and working during a pandemic outbreak. Framed within a feminist approach, this personal narrative provides an example of the effects of such unexpected and unprecedented circumstances on personal and professional academic lives. Developed during the first stage of the (inter)national coronavirus pandemic, my reflections address issues of privilege; emotional labour; the virtual invasion of the home space within the current increasingly ambiguous space of 'the workplace'; workload; and wellbeing. Further, I consider how the newly enforced flexible work measures based on online tools have turned current work-life dynamics into a 'Never-ending Shift'.

2.
Society ; 58(6): 483-492, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1920055

ABSTRACT

The world of political comment is often considered to be lacking in nuance and sophistication, dominated by immoderate polemicists. This connects to wider debates concerning knowledge and expertise in a liberal democracy, which the COVID-19 pandemic has brought to the fore. The article examines the contribution made to the debate concerning political comment by the British academic, political theorist and journalist Bernard Crick. Crick had a low opinion of much political comment which he believed provided a breeding ground for populist sentiment. For Crick, it was a duty of academics to contribute to the opinion space and elevate the standard of public discourse. The seriousness with which Crick took political journalism was a recognition of the important role it plays in the transmission of political ideas, one often underappreciated by academics. This article looks at Crick's own contribution as a frequent political commentator in the British press and how this connected with his moderate political stance and his conception of political activity. It argues that the example that Crick sets is, despite the very different media and academic landscape he operated in, worth emulating.

3.
J Dent Educ ; 2022 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1913824

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to identify factors that were associated with high burnout and investigate the prevalence of burnout among academic dental staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A cross-sectional online survey was carried out among academic dentists who are working in multiple dental schools in Arab countries. The Copenhagen Burnout Inventory was used to assess participants' work-related burnout. Logistic regression was used to assess the factors that increase the risk of burnout among academic dentists. RESULTS: Of the 254 participants who took part in the study, 141 were males (55.5%). The average age of the participants in the study was 42.1 years (standard deviation = 10.0). The prevalence of burnout among participants was 44.9% (n = 114). Using a fully adjusted logistic regression model, age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.09, p = 0.008) and gender (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31-0.94, p = 0.03) were significant variables associated with high overall burnout. Female individuals had a substantially reduced risk of experiencing high personal burnout than male participants (OR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.32-0.98, p = 0.043) in the personal burnout subdomain. While in the patient's burnout subdomain, age (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.08, p = 0.048), type of speciality (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.02-5.83, p = 0.044), and teaching place (OR = 2.49, 95% CI: 1.21-5.11, p = 0.013) were associated with higher burnout. CONCLUSION: This study concluded that gender and age are characteristics that increase the risk of higher burnout among academic dentists during the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
Innov High Educ ; : 1-19, 2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906290

ABSTRACT

Anticipating the deleterious effects of pandemic mitigation protocols on faculty's research and creative work, many universities introduced mechanisms for pre-tenured faculty to receive tenure clock extensions. Unlike most stop-the-clock extensions, which occur on an individual basis, the stop-the-tenure-clock during COVID-19 was a mass-triggering event that applied to all faculty. Informed by social role theory, we examined this unique situation of stop-the-tenure clock decisions by faculty at two different universities within the same state system. Institutional level demographic and field of study data on faculty decision making at one high research activity university (n = 97) and one very high research activity university (n = 387) were examined at two time points; a first tenure-clock stop opportunity and a second tenure-clock stop opportunity. Results show that although the overall rates of clock-stops were much larger at the research-intense university, the characteristics of who was most likely to accept or opt out of the first tenure-clock stop were similar at both universities. Ethnic minoritized faculty at both universities had greater odds of accepting the clock-stop. Results also showed that at both universities, women were somewhat more likely to accept the first tenure clock extension, and exploratory follow-up shows this gendered decision manifested differently depending on field of study. Relatively few faculty accepted the second tenure clock-stop. Our findings provide a portrait of who accepts or declines tenure clock extensions with important implications for downstream effects on equity within the academy.

5.
Ther Deliv ; 13(4): 205-209, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1887291

ABSTRACT

Graphical abstract [Formula: see text].


Subject(s)
Drug Delivery Systems
6.
Springer Series in Design and Innovation ; 16:161-174, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1877702

ABSTRACT

The spring of 2020 saw the spread of the virus COVID_19. The pandemic context experienced since demanded human physical distancing which results in the closure of universities and schools, ground flights, and closing spaces to stop all forms of gatherings. The forced lockdown to ensure the safety of people, and the government policies to close operations pressed and encouraged employers and employees to adopt telework notwithstanding the short time to prepare everyone for a new model of work. Before the pandemic, telework faced a slow acceptance and adoption in European countries. The pandemic was and still is a driving force for the adoption of telework, in this case considering the remote workplace employees’ domestic environs. A review of literature exposes plenty of information regarding telework benefits and drawbacks, but scarce information is available about the relationship between telework and Academia. This article aims to understand the academia’s experience of working from home, especially the features of home workplace and its impact on the health and wellbeing of the individuals. At the end, the main question is if academics want to stay with any form of telework. The responses obtained revealed that academics want to remain in telework several days a week and have working space conditions to do so. Literature review and online questionnaire performed the theoretical framework and contextual data to support the conclusions achieved. The answers ascertained the experience as a positive one, indicating that home workplaces have comfortable, technical and private conditions and there is a generic expectation to proceed with telework for several days a week. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

7.
Forum : Qualitative Social Research ; 23(2), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1870775

ABSTRACT

Die Photovoice-Methode, ursprünglich als Mittel entwickelt, um die Stimmen vulnerabler Bevölkerungsgruppen und marginalisierte Erfahrungen hörbar zu machen, wurde kürzlich für die Online-Anwendung während der COVID-19-Pandemie angepasst. In diesem Artikel erörtere ich die Umsetzung von Online-Photovoice in einem asynchronen Modus. Ich untersuche das Potenzial der Methodik für Gleichberechtigung, Inklusion und soziale Gerechtigkeit anhand einer internationalen Studie, die mit "motherscholars" (Müttern in der Wissenschaft) durchgeführt wurde, die während der ersten Welle der COVID-19-Pandemie begannen, ihre Kinder durch Online-Lernen zu begleiten. Ich beschreibe die Schritte der Online-Photovoice-Studie, die dazu dienen sollte, die Stimme der Teilnehmerinnen zu stärken, und die Herausforderungen, mit denen sie konfrontiert wurden. In diesem Sinne biete ich neue Einsichten u.a. in zu vermeidende Hindernisse, praktische Tipps sowie kritische Fragen zur Selbstreflexion für andere Forscher*innen, die ihr Instrumentarium für die qualitative Forschung zur sozialen Gerechtigkeit erweitern möchten.Alternate :While researchers initially developed photovoice methodology as a means to hear voices of vulnerable populations and of marginalized experiences, using it in an online format has recently been adapted for application during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, I discuss implementing online photovoice in an asynchronous mode. I explore the potential of the methodology for equity, inclusion and social justice through an international study conducted with motherscholars (mothers in academia) who suddenly began guiding their children through online learning during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. I describe the steps in the online photovoice study that was intended to amplify participant voice and the challenges faced. As such, I propose novel insights, practical tips, obstacles to avoid, and critical self-reflective questions for researchers interested in expanding their toolkit for qualitative social justice research.

8.
Adv J ; 2(3)2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1863177

ABSTRACT

In this essay, I detail how homogenizing appraisals of diverse faculty women during COVID-19 are harmful to all, including myself. I highlight how academic demands to be "talking heads" and not full human beings, though not new, is especially harmful in the current era. As a Black woman faculty dealing with the double pandemic of COVID-19 and anti-Black racism, the one-dimensional appraisals of women faculty exclude me: I am not a mother dealing with sexist overburden in household responsibilities that interfere with my work. Instead, I am dealing with isolation and loneliness, which I sublimate through work productivity. Resulting in shame, I also realize that universities could operate differently, recognizing women scholars for their diversity in identities, backgrounds, responsibilities, work styles, and personalities during the pandemic and beyond. Given that work productivity is not synonymous with well-being, I hope my colleagues know that, in this moment, I am not okay.

9.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-333472

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 crisis has affected millions of people over the world bringing about conspicuous changes in our work and social lives. With the advent of COVID-19 and subsequent ‘lockdown’ involving social distancing norms, travel restrictions, and workplace closures, the academia faced a huge crisis. Educational institutions and teaching-learning systems had to hastily switch to online mode. Without any precedence and guidelines, this was a major challenge. The ‘digital divide’ was very evident in the Indian scenario. However, determination of the students and teachers proved fruitful and curriculum transaction techniques of all disciplines soon adapted to modified system. Suggestive measures have been put forward, based on the outcomes and analyses of surveys and questionnaires. Considering all aspects, the blended mode of curriculum transaction may be recommended to address the current global crisis.

10.
Pharmacy (Basel) ; 10(2)2022 Apr 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792571

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to significant disruption in students' lives through lockdowns, restricted movement, remote instruction, and mixed information. Therefore, this study aimed to capture the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of student pharmacists during 2020-2021. A 43-item COVID-19 Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (COVKAP) survey previously developed was administered at four schools of pharmacy across the U.S. during Fall 2020 and Spring 2021. A total of 418 responses were analyzed from graduating classes of 2021-2024. There were no significant differences in correct COVID-19 knowledge responses across the four graduating years. Respondents' attitudes around COVID-19 were homogenous with the exception for their belief in their preparedness to administer COVID-19 vaccines. Respondents reported wearing masks daily (76.8%), infrequently visiting restaurants (82.1%), practicing social distancing daily (45.7%), and referring to medical journals for information (72%). In conclusion, during the pandemic, student pharmacists experienced significant changes in their academic lives. Their knowledge and subsequent attitudes and practices were consistent with the state of evidence during Fall 2020 and Spring 2021. Subsequently, as newer information has emerged, the authors suggest that the COVKAP survey may be modified and administered frequently to address student needs and concerns as the pandemic evolves.

11.
Italian Journal of Gender-Specific Medicine ; 8(1):50-54, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1789248

ABSTRACT

Economic and political agencies have reported a worldwide increase in gender inequalities during the CO-VID-19 pandemic, exposing the frailty of the advances in gender equality in the context of a global crisis. Here, we provide an overview on how the COVID-19 pandemic ampli-fied gender-related vulnerabilities in Brazil, establishing a parallel with the pre-pandemic scenario and evaluating many aspects of the problem, including motherhood and racial issues. At the same time, we also discuss how the abrupt disruption in the labor routine during the COVID-19 pandemic overloaded Brazilian women with household and childcare activities and, more specifically, how women’s ca-reers and scientific-academic production were affected. Briefly, the workload and stress imposed on female researchers force them to choose between their professional accom-plishments and their families, thus exacerbating gender disparities within the Brazilian academia. Studies and gov-ernmental reports reveal that such a burden was even more prominent for mothers with young children and for black scientists. Finally, we describe examples of affirmative ac-tions aimed at counterbalancing gender inequalities within the Brazilian academia, which became crucial to mitigate the effects of the social upheaval during the pandemic. © 2022, Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore s.r.l. All rights reserved.

12.
Brunei International Medical Journal ; 2022(18):9-15, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1772393

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented global disruption, affecting every aspect of life including education. For medical schools and health sciences institutions, the restrictions imposed by the pandemic have resulted in the cessation of onsite classes, suspension of clinical attachments and restructuring of the students’ examination. Students of medicine and health sci-ences have always been considered an available resource in terms of volunteerism during a health crisis. Students at Pengiran Anak Puteri Rashidah Sa’adatul Bolkiah (PAPRSB) Institute of Health Sciences have been volunteering in both non-direct patient contact and direct patient contact ac-tivities. During the pandemic, most of these students’ conventional university study and learning have been put on hold as a result of the restrictions. The need to continue learning is important, the students can therefore use the volunteerism during the pandemic as a learning opportunity looking to maintain and broaden their skills. It is however imperative that appropriate and ade-quate support, advice and training are provided to these students, not allowing them to under-take any activity beyond their level of competence, and with continuous supervision and ade-quate protection with personal protection equipment throughout their volunteerism during the pandemic. © 2022, Brunei International Medical Journal. All rights reserved.

13.
Elife ; 112022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766127

ABSTRACT

Publications are essential for a successful academic career, and there is evidence that the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified existing gender disparities in the publishing process. We used longitudinal publication data on 431,207 authors in four disciplines - basic medicine, biology, chemistry and clinical medicine - to quantify the differential impact of COVID-19 on the annual publishing rates of men and women. In a difference-in-differences analysis, we estimated that the average gender difference in publication productivity increased from -0.26 in 2019 to -0.35 in 2020; this corresponds to the output of women being 17% lower than the output of men in 2109, and 24% lower in 2020. An age-group comparison showed a widening gender gap for both early-career and mid-career scientists. The increasing gender gap was most pronounced among highly productive authors and in biology and clinical medicine. Our study demonstrates the importance of reinforcing institutional commitments to diversity through policies that support the inclusion and retention of women in research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Efficiency , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Publishing , Sex Factors
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760620

ABSTRACT

The present study provides evidence for a valid and reliable tool, the Academic Quality at Work Tool (AQ@workT), to investigate the quality of life at work in academics within the Italian university sector. The AQ@workT was developed by the QoL@Work research team, namely a group of expert academics in the field of work and organizational psychology affiliated with the Italian Association of Psychologists. The tool is grounded in the job demands-resources model and its psychometric properties were assessed in three studies comprising a wide sample of lecturers, researchers, and professors: a pilot study (N = 120), a calibration study (N = 1084), and a validation study (N = 1481). Reliability and content, construct, and nomological validity were supported, as well as measurement invariance across work role (researchers, associate professors, and full professors) and gender. Evidence from the present study shows that the AQ@workT represents a useful and reliable tool to assist university management to enhance quality of life, to manage work-related stress, and to mitigate the potential for harm to academics, particularly during a pandemic. Future studies, such as longitudinal tests of the AQ@workT, should test predictive validity among the variables in the tool.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Humans , Italy , Pilot Projects , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne ; : No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1740405

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has brought about enormous changes to all aspects of academic life. In spring 2020, we recruited faculty from Canadian universities who were asked to complete a survey about the perceived impact of the pandemic on aspects of their well-being and work productivity. Eight hundred ninety-nine academics from across Canada responded, reporting that the pandemic had had a significant negative impact on their mental health, work satisfaction, first-author publications, grants, and data collection. Overall weekly work hours dropped by 22% compared to prepandemic levels, from 45 hr/week to 35 hr. Though parents of children under the age of 13 managed to maintain an average of 30 hr/week despite juggling childcare and work duties, they nonetheless fared worse compared to nonparents and parents of older children on nearly all indicators of work productivity and well-being. Furthermore, mothers of young children reported having fewer uninterrupted work hours and spending more time as primary caregiver compared to fathers. Thus, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a considerable negative impact on the self-reported well-being and work productivity of Canadian academics, and even more so among parents of young children. Mothers of young children may be particularly in need of additional support. These findings highlight the importance of adopting policies at the federal and institutional levels aimed at "leveling the playing field" for these groups as well as instituting creative childcare solutions that maintain health and safety while not further disadvantaging young parents. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) (French) La pandemie de la maladie causee par le coronavirus (COVID-19) a suscite d'enormes changements dans tous les volets de la vie universitaire. Au printemps 2020, nous avons effectue un sondage parmi les membres du personnel d'universites canadiennes afin de connaitre les repercussions percues de la pandemie sur divers aspects de leur bien-etre et sur leur productivite. Ont repondu au questionnaire 899 personnes de partout au pays, lesquelles ont signale que la pandemie avait eu d'importantes repercussions negatives sur leur sante mentale, leur niveau de satisfaction au travail, le nombre de publications comme premier auteur, l'obtention de subventions et la collecte de donnees. Dans l'ensemble, le nombre d'heures travaillees par semaine a chute de 22 %, comparativement a celui d'avant la pandemie, passant de 45 a 35 heures. Bien que les parents d'enfants de moins de 13 ans aient reussi a maintenir un horaire moyen de 30 heures semaine, jonglant les services de garde et le travail, ils ont des resultats tres inferieurs aux personnes sans enfants ou aux parents d'enfants plus ages pour presque tous les indicateurs de productivite et de bien-etre. De plus, les meres de jeunes enfants ont rapporte avoir un nombre inferieur d'heures de travail ininterrompues et avoir consacre plus de temps comme principaux fournisseurs de soins en comparaison des peres. Ainsi, la pandemie de COVID-19 a eu d'importantes repercussions sur les niveaux autorapportes de bien-etre et de productivite des chercheurs universitaires canadiens, en particulier parmi les parents de jeunes enfants. Les meres de jeunes enfants ont peut-etre particulierement besoin de soutien supplementaire. Ces resultats mettent en relief l'importance d'adopter des politiques federales et institutionnelles visant a egaliser les chances pour ces groupes, de meme que d'etablir des solutions novatrices pour la garde d'enfants qui assurent la sante et la securite, sans desavantager les jeunes parents. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) Impact Statement Public Significance Statement: The current findings suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a considerable negative impact on the self-reported well-being and work productivity of Canadian academics, and even more so among parents of young children. Mothers of young children may be particularly in need of additional support. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Am J Pharm Educ ; : 8985, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689865

ABSTRACT

The increasing levels of workplace stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has caused some members of the Academy to leave their jobs, in part due to levels of distrust between employees and their supervisors. In order to combat distrust and rebuild trust in the Academy, we must first know what the elements of trust are: boundaries, reliability, accountability, vault, integrity, nonjudgement, and generosity. Focusing on generosity, believing that everyone is doing the best that they can, is a first step towards rebuilding trust with students, staff members, faculty members, and members of administration.

17.
Sociologiceskoe Obozrenie ; 20(4):43-65, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1667819

ABSTRACT

The goal of this article is to analyze the challenges faced by social researchers during the first months of the pandemic of 2020 when work-life issues were problematized and academic routine changed. The article is based on a dataset of diaries in which researchers with an academic background in social sciences and humanities were fixing their everyday life and reflecting on its changes. We explore why academicians, a relatively privileged group due to their possibilities of safe remote-working and maintaining professional obligations during the period of lockdown, experienced strong moral emotions related to work. We argue that basic references of space and time lost their routine structure, hindered work productivity, and threatened the "proper", disciplined, and productive academic self. In their written narratives, participants of the project describe different emotional responses to this situation, with a focus on negative feelings including anxiety and guilt. The new reality was characterized by the layering of previously separated tasks at the same time and space boundaries, and therefore, in overload. At the same time, academicians were deprived of routine forms of face-to-face professional communications and networking. Academicians are oriented towards self-discipline and productivity, and self is produced via normative (self) evaluation and the juxtaposition with reference group(s). When the rules are changed, unstable, or constantly violated, it threatens the self. Moral emotions indicate this process until the new social order becomes inhabited and routinized.

18.
Journal of Diversity in Higher Education ; : 15, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1655474

ABSTRACT

Feminist scholars have long documented the complex, multiple ways in which academic institutions reproduce gender inequalities (National Academy of Sciences. National Academy of Engineering. & Institute of Medicine, 2007). In times of crisis, institutional commitments to diversity, equity, and inclusion may be sidelined (Tulshyan, 2020). Academia must enact responses to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that retain and promote diverse women faculty who are already disadvantaged in their institution. This includes ensuring that structural shifts, such as policy changes, lead to deep, cultural change, embedding equity into the fabric of institutional norms and values. In this article, we outline a model for institutional change-the Thinking Ahead, Resource Provision, Evaluation, Equity (TREE) model-with the aim of informing diversity efforts in higher education more broadly during the pandemic.

19.
Journal of Global Responsibility ; 13(1):7-20, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1621774

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis paper aims to investigate how the COVID-19 health crisis could help business schools move towards more responsible management education (RME). Business schools have been extensively blamed in previous crises for not educating their students in a responsible way. The COVID-19 pandemic could be the pivotal opportunity for business schools to regain legitimacy and a wake-up call to accelerate their journey towards RME. The authors aim to outline an illustration of the transition to a hybrid teaching model and how such educational reconfiguration might lead to more sustainable and RME, also beyond COVID-19.Design/methodology/approachA qualitative approach is proposed to analyse and decrypt the challenges and opportunities of a hybrid approach, its implications for the transformation of business schools and RME. This study also includes a state-of-the-art literature review, a specific investigation of the case of ESCP, the European cross-border multi-campus business school, and in-depth interviews with stakeholders impacted by the crisis.FindingsThe health crisis demonstrated the unprecedented capability of higher education to embrace rapid and profound change. Furthermore, the pandemic served as a wake-up call in that it may even have caused the progress of business schools, previously somewhat reluctant, towards more socially responsible and sustainable thinking. Thus, the schools have used the COVID-19 crisis as an opportunity to regain legitimacy and be part of the solution rather than part of the problem.Practical implicationsThe paper pulls together a multitude of suggestions for higher education in general and business schools in particular.Originality/valueCombining two of higher education’s main challenges, namely, digitalisation and sustainability and applying the principles for responsible management education framework to map and analyse the pandemic’s implications, this paper provides a new, compelling and inspiring resource for business schools on their path to a more responsible management approach and education.

20.
Journal of Land Use Science ; : 17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1612267

ABSTRACT

What are patterns of gender and authorship in urban land science? Our bibliometric analysis shows that the proportion of women shrinks among highly productive, impactful, and senior authors, akin to a pyramid shape. First, women are only one in ten researchers with an h-index above the 95th percentile. Second, women are first authors on 20% of all influential papers cited more than one hundred times. Third, women publish less frequently (1.6 papers/year) than men (2.2). Fourth, women have shorter career lengths (9.4 years) than men (11.8). Since the 2000s, citation rates for women and men have converged. For the generation starting careers since 2016, the proportion of women with an h-index above the 90th percentile increased to 25%. During the Covid-19 pandemic, there was a 51% increase in productivity for women. Despite these changes, gender disparities in urban land science are most pronounced among the most productive and impactful authors.

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