Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 762
Filter
1.
Journal of Transport & Health ; 25:101345, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821398

ABSTRACT

Background Over the last two decades, bicycling as a mode for transportation has declined by 64% among 16- to 20-year-old adolescents in Switzerland, the largest decrease of any age group. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of a bicycle training on adolescents’ cycling skills. In addition, the study investigated whether there is a relationship between school distance, mode of transport, bicycle use and cycling skills. Methods 77 adolescents (Mean age = 17.1 ± 0.8 years) were assigned to the intervention group (n = 48) or control group (n = 29). In both groups, a validated practical cycling skills test was performed at baseline and 2 weeks after baseline. The intervention group performed 2 h of bicycle training one week after the baseline test. A questionnaire was used to determine bicycle use, mode of transportation and distance to school. Due to Covid-19 school closures, only an online questionnaire was administered at 6-month follow-up. To analyze the effects of cycling training on cycling skills, multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, gender, and baseline cycling skills were applied. Results Compared to the control group, the total cycling skills increased in the intervention group (β = 4.54, [0.89 : 8.19], p = 0.02), as well as riding over a wooden plank with a ladder profile (β = 1.14, [0.08 : 2.19], p = 0.04) and controlled riding over a step (β = 1.48, [0.63 : 2.33], p ≤ 0.001). An association was found between bicycle use, mode of transportation, and cycling skills (p < 0.05). In contrast, no association could be found for school distance. Conclusion Cycling training improved adolescents’ cycling skills in the short term. Cycling skills correlated with bicycle use and mode of transportation.

2.
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology ; 20(1):43-68, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820643

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The sudden changes in school educational modality due to the COVID-19 pandemic and social isolation have affected the lifestyle, mental and emotional health, and perception of their academic training in students with high intellectual abilities. The aim of this study was to analyze the predictor variables of sleepiness, satisfaction with studies, and emotional exhaustion in students with high intellectual abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method. This study involved 409 third to fifth grade high school students with high intellectual abilities and who receive a free special education associated with talent and high achievement (COAR). Ages ranged from 14 to 17 years (M = 15.26, SD = .89). The Brief Study Satisfaction Scale (EBSE), Emotional Fatigue Scale (ECE), Eating Habits and Physical Activity Scale (EHAAF), Pittsburgh Index, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale-2 (GAD-2) and Epworth Short Sleepiness Scale (ESE) were used. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the normality of the variables was assessed. In addition, a predictive model was analyzed based on goodness-of-fit indices using structural equation modeling. The analyses were performed using SPSS 24.0 and Amos 24.0 statistical software. Results. The descriptive analysis yielded adequate skewness and kurtosis coefficients. The analyses showed that all variables were significantly correlated (p < .01). Likewise, the predictive model of sleepiness, satisfaction with studies and emotional exhaustion presents adequate goodness-of-fit indices (X-2 = 7.427, gl = 6, p = .283, X-2/gl = 1.238, TLI = 0.994, CFI = 0.998, RMSEA = 0.024 and SRMR = 0.186). Conclusion. This study presents a predictive model of sleepiness, study satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion in students with high intellectual abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is concluded that physical activity, eating habits and sleep quality are predictors of sleepiness and, in turn, generalized anxiety, physical activity and sleep quality predict emotional fatigue, which is also a predictor of satisfaction with studies.

3.
Biomedicines ; 10(4):43, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820166

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pandemic has affected the physical health, psychological wellbeing, and mental health of the whole population. Young people are among those most at risk of developing mental health symptoms or disorders related to the pandemic. Purpose: the present narrative review is aimed at providing an updated overview of the current literature concerning the psychological impact of the SARS-CoV-2 infection but also of the COVID-19 outbreak, environmental restriction, and social distancing on mental health outcomes among the youth population aged between 15 and 25 years. Methods: in December 2021, an electronic search on this topic was performed on PubMed. Relevant publications from January 2020 until December 2021 were included. Findings: 53 cross-sectional studies, 26 longitudinal studies, 4 ecological studies, 1 qualitative study, and 1 systematic review were included. We found many methodological limitations in the studies included, especially poor choice of study samples and short follow-ups. Little literature was in support of a strong relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infection and consequences on youth mental health. On the contrary, many studies showed how extraordinary measures to limit the spread of the virus have impacted young people in terms of onset of new mental disorders and symptoms, suicidality, and access to emergency psychiatric services. Depressive and anxiety symptoms and disorders show the greatest increase in incidence, especially in girls and young women. Conclusions: it seems important to pay attention to the mental health of young people in relation to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, studies with more robust methodologies and longer follow-ups are needed to establish precise indications for targeted interventions in this context.

4.
Psychology in the Schools ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819386

ABSTRACT

In the United States, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic necessitated nationwide closures of kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12) schools. Stay-at-home orders and social distancing mandates were also implemented to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize the existing literature on how COVID-19 impacted K-12 students' eating patterns, physical activity, and sleep in the United States. Utilizing the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a literature search was conducted between October and December 2021. Inclusion criteria were studies focused on COVID-19 and eating patterns, physical activity, and sleep in students enrolled in K-12 schools since March 2020. International studies were excluded. Mixed findings were observed for eating patterns whereby the consumption of unhealthful savory and sweet items and healthful snacks (e.g., fruit and vegetables) increased. Reductions in physical activity and disrupted sleep routines were also observed. Heterogeneity in methodological procedures may limit the generalizability of these findings. In the United States, preliminary data suggest that select health-promoting behaviors were negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Given that prolonged unhealthful eating patterns, physical inactivity, and poor sleep contribute to chronic disease risk, initiatives that increase health-promoting behaviors are warranted.

5.
Adolescents ; 2(1):113, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1818036

ABSTRACT

Measures taken to contain the COVID-19 pandemic are particularly stressful for families. Limited data is available regarding the effects of a mandatory quarantine on the psychological stress of children, adolescents and their parents. Quarantined individuals participating in the online-based CoCo-Fakt study had at least one child <3, 3 to <6, 6 to <10, 10 to <14 and 14 to <16 years old (n = 2153). Parents were asked about how often their children felt nervous, anxious, or tense, down or depressed, lonely or physical reactions occur. A relative sum score characterizing psychosocial stress was determined and related to parents’ socio-demographic factors, psychosocial distress, coping strategies and resilience. Parents reported significantly higher psychological stress if at least one child was quarantined. Parents’ relative psychological stress sum score had the strongest influence on the psychological state of the children across all age groups (β = 0.315–0.457) besides male sex of the reporting parent, no partnership, low to medium socioeconomic status, lower resilience and coping scores, and parents quarantined as close contacts. The variance in the linear regression models was between 17.8% and 31.4%. These findings highlight that the entire family system must be considered during official mandatory quarantines.

6.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13:14, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1818010

ABSTRACT

This study used the Social Cognitive Theory and Broaden-and-Build Theory to propose and validate a chain mediation model. In total, 417 Chinese college students were studied to explore the effects of parent-child relationships on their academic performance. In addition, we investigated the chain-mediating roles of gratitude and psychological capital. The results showed that (1) the parent-child relationship significantly and positively affected the academic performance of college students;(2) gratitude partially mediated the parent-child relationship and the academic performance of college students;(3) psychological capital partially mediated the parent-child relationship and the academic performance of college students;and (4) gratitude and psychological capital exerted a chain-mediating effect between parent-child relationships and the academic performance of college students. Based on the results of the study, we conclude that the parent-child relationship not only directly affects the academic performance of college students but also indirectly affects it through the chain mediation of gratitude and psychological capital. Moreover, we proposed reasonable suggestions on how colleges and universities can guide students to deal with parent-child relationships, strengthen gratitude education, and improve psychological capital.

7.
Clinical Infectious Diseases ; : 6, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1816033

ABSTRACT

Background The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disproportionately affected more socioeconomically disadvantaged persons and areas. We sought to determine how certain sociodemographic factors were correlated to adolescents' COVID-19 vaccination rates in towns and cities ("communities") in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Methods Data on COVID-19 vaccination rates were obtained over a 20-week period from 30 March 2021 to 10 August 2021. Communities' adolescent (ages 12-19) vaccination rates were compared across quintiles of community-level income, COVID-19 case rate, and proportion of non-Hispanic Black or Hispanic individuals. Other variables included population density and earlier COVID-19 vaccination rates of adolescents and adults, averaged from 30 March to 11 May to determine their effects on vaccination rates on 10 August. Linear and logistic regression was used to estimate individual effects of variables on adolescent vaccination rates. Results Higher median household income, lower proportion of Black or Hispanic individuals, higher early adolescent COVID-19 vaccination rates, and higher early adult COVID-19 vaccination rates were associated with higher later adolescent COVID-19 vaccination rates. Income per $10 000 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.01 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.02]), proportion of Hispanic individuals (aOR = 1.33 [95% CI: 1.13-1.56]), early adolescent COVID-19 vaccination rates (aOR = 5.28 [95% CI: 4.67-5.96]), and early adult COVID-19 vaccination rates (aOR = 2.31 [95% CI: 2.02-2.64]) were associated with higher adolescent COVID-19 vaccination on 10 August, whereas proportion of Black individuals approached significance (aOR = 1.26 [95% CI: .98-1.61]). Conclusions Vaccination efforts for adolescents in Massachusetts should focus on boosting vaccination rates early in communities with the lowest incomes and greatest proportion of Hispanic individuals and consider targeting communities with a greater proportion of Black individuals. In Massachusetts communities, lower income, early adolescent and adult vaccinations, and higher proportion of Black or Hispanic individuals correlated with lower adolescent vaccination rates. Prior to the roll-out of COVID-19 vaccinations, planners should lay groundwork targeting such communities.

8.
Zeitschrift Fur Entwicklungspsychologie Und Padagogische Psychologie ; 54(2):80-92, 2022.
Article in German | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1815482

ABSTRACT

To improve suicide prevention in schools, we implemented workshops for students in grades 8-10. The students (N=200) were randomly assigned to either a training or a control group and were surveyed regarding their help-seeking and help-giving behavior and their depressive symptoms both before and after the training as well as 3 months later. The results indicate that especially those students assessed to be at a higher risk for suicide benefitted most from the training. Their number of depressive symptoms decreased significantly and remained stable. Participants undergoing the training tended to be more likely to ask a teacher for help and to initiate more crisis counseling interactions with peers in need than did untrained controls;these differences, however, were not statistically significant. Though hampered by high dropout rates because of the Covid-19 pandemic and a restrictive prescreening process. these results indicate the positive effects of an extracurricular suicide prevention program on students' well-being and behavior.

9.
Can J Diabetes ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1814637

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents and young adults living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) involved in the national Improving Renal Complications in Adolescents with T2D through REsearch (iCARE) study. METHODS: The Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) COVID-19 Questionnaire developed by the National Institutes of Health ECHO COVID-19 Task Force was administered to participants (n=85) from the iCARE study between June 2020 and October 2020. Children 12 years old (via parent report) and adolescents and young adults ≥13 years old (via self-report) participated. The questionnaire assessed the impact of the pandemic on health-care appointments, lifestyle, internet use, social connections and mental health. RESULTS: Participants were 17.0±3.1 (range, 12 to 27) years of age and predominantly female (61.3%). During the pandemic, 69.4% were able to attend their health-care appointments by telephone or virtual platforms, 31.7% ate more, 45.1% slept more and 29.3% spent less time on physical activities. There was an increase in internet use for both educational (42.0%) and noneducational purposes (54.9%). Participants felt less socially connected (64.6%). Participants also felt sometimes (59.2%), often (19.7%) and very often (6.7%) satisfied with their lives. DISCUSSION: Our study revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic has had various impacts on the daily lives of adolescents and young adults living with T2D. Future research should include longitudinal studies of the health burden of the COVID-19 pandemic on this population, with a more in-depth evaluation of mental health outcomes and clinical outcomes.

10.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1813836

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the literature on the trends in substance use among youth during the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: The pandemic has given rise to concerns about the mental health and social well-being of youth, including its potential to increase or exacerbate substance use behaviors. This systematic review identified and included 49 studies of use across alcohol, cannabis, tobacco, e-cigarettes/vaping, and other drugs, and unspecified substances. The majority of studies across all categories of youth substance use reported reductions in prevalence, except in the case of other drugs and unspecified drug and substance use, which included three studies that reported an increase in use and three studies that reported decrease in use. Overall, the results of this review suggest that the prevalence of youth substance use has largely declined during the pandemic. Youth substance use in the post-pandemic years will require monitoring and continued surveillance.

11.
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils ; 8(5):12393-12399, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1813129

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on all sectors of life in all age groups, including teenagers. The physical and psychological responses on adolescents due to the COVID-19 pandemic cannot be explained yet. This study aims to explain the physical and psychological responses of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents. This research method was descriptive with a survey approach. The survey was conducted on 219 teenagers in the West Surabaya area. Respondents filled out questionnaires about physical responses (weight, height and use of minus glasses), psychological responses (anxiety, stress and depression), and social responses (social interactions). DASS was used to measure the psychological response. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon sign rank test to measure body weight before and during pandemic COVID-19. The physical responses that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic were an increase in the respondent's weight and the use of glasses due to the online school process. The social response that occurs is adolescent social interaction at a sufficient level. Psychological responses showed stress 57%, anxiety 68.9%, and depression 63.9%;only 7.8% teenagers have good social interaction. The responses of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents can be seen physically, socially and psychologically. Efforts are needed to overcome and anticipate problems resulting from these changes.

12.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ; 70(35):1220-1222, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1813125

ABSTRACT

In this study, a total of 463 school-associated cases were reported among students attending public TK 12 schools in person and 3927 among staff members working on-site from 1 September, 2020 to 31 March, 2021. During the same period, 105,577 cases among children and adolescents aged 5-17 years and 771,409 cases among adults aged 18-79 years were reported in LAC. School-associated case rates remained low among students, ranging from 110 per 100,000 in September to 859 in December 2020. Case rates among all children and adolescents aged 5-17 years in the county were higher during most of the period, ranging from 167 per 100,000 in September to 2938 in December 2020. School-associated case rates among staff members were lowest in September 2020, peaked in December 2020, and fell sharply through March 2021. These rates reflected the trend among all adults aged 18 79 years in the county (319 per 100,000 in September 2020;4624 in December 2020;and 181 in March 2021) but were lower for most of the period. The findings suggest that implementing recommended prevention measures might protect children, adolescents, and adults from COVID-19 in TK 12 schools. The level of protection appears to be higher in children and adolescents than in adults. In schools with safety protocols in place for prevention and containment, case rates in children and adolescents were 3.4 times lower during the winter peak compared with rates in the community. This analysis reflects transmission patterns before the more transmissible SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant became predominant in the United States.

13.
Boletín epidemiológico semanal ; 29(4):35-47, 2022.
Article in Spanish | GIM | ID: covidwho-1813045

ABSTRACT

Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis. IMD has been notifiable since 1901 and must be reported to the National Epidemiological Surveillance Network (RENAVE). This study shows the results obtained during the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 seasons. During the 2018-2019 season, the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease continued the increasing trend observed during the previous five seasons. Mainly due to the increase of cases of serogroup W and Y. The incidence of cases reported during the 2019/2020 season decreased by 31,3% compared to the previous 2018/2019 season. Incidence decreased in all serogroups and in all age groups. This decrease could be due to the addition of several factors. First, this season coincided, in part, with the onset of the COVID pandemic, and measures to contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2 affected its transmission. Second, the tetravalent conjugate vaccine (Men ACWY) was introduced into the vaccination schedule in adolescents (12 years old) and finally, other limitations of surveillance during this year could affect the decrease.

14.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ; 71(9):347-351, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1812759

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic? Adults aged 18 years reported adverse reactions less frequently after receipt of a homologous Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster dose than after the second primary dose. What is added by this report? Among persons aged 12-17 years, reactions after Pfizer-BioNTech booster vaccination were generally mild to moderate and transient;the frequency of local and systemic reactions reported to v-safe after a booster dose were equal to or slightly higher than after the second primary dose. Myocarditis was less frequently reported after a booster dose than a second primary dose. What are the implications for public health practice? Health care providers, parents, and adolescents should be advised that local and systemic reactions are expected among adolescents after a homologous Pfizer-BioNTech booster vaccination and that serious adverse events are rare.

15.
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils ; 8(4):15615-15618, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1812706

ABSTRACT

Relevance: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age. The prevalence rates of PCOS depend on the diagnostic criteria used and the characteristics of the population sample, and in the general population of women of reproductive age, the prevalence of the syndrome ranges from 6-9% to 19.9% [1,2]. According to modern criteria adopted by the consensus in Rotterdam, then systematically updated by ESHRE / ASRM (2014), the presence of two of the three criteria in a patient simultaneously allows to diagnose PCOS if other pathological conditions are excluded (thyroid pathology, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenogenitalsyndrome, androgen-secreting tumors, Itsenko-Cushing syndrome). Modern international diagnostic criteria include the following signs: (1) signs of polycystic ovaries according to information from pelvic ultrasound investigation (the presence of more than 10 follicles in each ovary);(2) oligo-anovulation;(3) clinical (presence of hirsutism) or biochemical (increased androgen levels) development of ovarian hyperandrogenism [3, 4]. Polycystic ovary syndrome is closely related to many diseases, including metabolic syndrome. Although insulin resistance is an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome and other diseases associated with PCOS, hyperandrogenismmay also be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and metabolic syndrome in female patients. Obesity is the most common symptom in PCOS patients (33-88%), which has a large impact on fertility and can lead to adverse effects such as menstrual irregularities, anovulation, infertility and abortion. Therefore, weight management in early PCOS is essential to improve fertility and quality of life. Hyperandrogenism plays a decisive role in abdominal obesity in obese women during adolescence, adulthood and menopause [5]. Although some studies have shown a negative association between plasma androgen levels (A4, DHEA and DHEAS) and obesity [6,7]. But the mechanism of how androgens affect fat cells in women is poorly understood. A number of observations show that among obese women with PCOS, metabolic disorders associated with insulin resistance and obesity, in many cases, play a more important role in the mechanism of anovulation in PCOS than excess androgens. In recent years, it has been established that in PCOS there is a frequent combination of hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. With insulin resistance, there is a decrease in the response of insulin-sensitive tissues to the hormone insulin with its sufficient level in the blood. Insulin resistance is found in 30-70% of patients with PCOS who are overweight or obese, and in patients with normal body weight it occurs in 20-25% of cases. The above facts, as well as our own observations, prompted us to analyze the studied women of fertile age with impaired reproductive system against the background of overweight and obesity. Considering the above, the aim of this study was to identify the relationship between insulin resistance and reproductive disorders in women with overweight and obesity. Material and research methods. The study included 123 women with clinical development of HA and impaired reproductive function, who consulted the consultative clinic of the RSSPMC of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Uzbekistan. The criteria for inclusion in the main group were: age of women from 18 to 35 years (average age was 25.8 .. 3.28 years), absence of pregnancy, body mass index over 25 kg / m2. Exclusion criteria from the main group: type 1 and 2 diabetes, pituitary tumors, hypogonadotropichypogonadism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, hypothyroidism, severe somatic pathology. All patients who applied for the consultation underwent: (1) Collection of anamnestic information. (2) Measurement of anthropometric indicators (height, weight, waist and hip circumference) and assessment of body hair growth using the Ferriman-Hallway scale. (3) Body mass index was

16.
R I Med J (2013) ; 105(4):9-15, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1812674

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: This study aimed to understand how the COVID-19 pandemic affected youth presentations to the Emergency Department's psychiatric service and how many warranted an inpatient and acute residential admission. METHODS: This cross-sectional study examined the patients (youth ages 3 to 18 years) evaluated at Hasbro Children's Hospital's Emergency Department by Lifespan's Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Service (LPBHES) over four months, March through June, of years 2019, 2020, and 2021. The sample was categorized into two groups: Children ages 3 to 11 years and adolescents ages 12 to 18 years. RESULTS: Youth evaluated by LPBHES showed an increase in acuity, where 11% more children and 12% more adolescents met criteria for inpatient and acute residential admission from years 2019 to 2020. This increase was observed despite fewer overall LPBHES evaluations. CONCLUSION: Future directions include prospective studies that explore the barriers to youth receiving the appropriate level of outpatient mental health services to prevent acute mental health crises.

17.
Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal ; 28(3):242-243, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1812016

ABSTRACT

Summary of discussions Factors that influence body weight and promote the development of childhood overweight and obesity include a long-lasting positive energy balance (often as a result of increased consumption of energy dense foods), physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and food marketing. The Regional implementation framework on ending preventable newborn, child and adolescent deaths and improving health and development (4), adopted in 2019, proposes key actions in three areas: promoting equitable access to quality newborn, child and adolescent health services in the context of universal health coverage;protecting newborns, children and adolescents from the impact of health emergencies;and strengthening the integration of health programmes and multisectoral coordination and partnerships for the promotion of healthier newborns, children and adolescents. Recommendations A number of areas where Member States require technical support were identified, including: restricting food marketing to children;surveillance of childhood overweight and obesity;school feeding programmes and school nutrition;nutrition education in schools;and nutrition in primary health care.

18.
Pathogens ; 11(4):383, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1810059

ABSTRACT

Child and adolescent tuberculosis (TB) has been long neglected by TB programs but there have been substantive strides in prioritizing TB among these populations in the past two decades. Yet, gaps remain in translating evidence and policy to action at the primary care level, ensuring access to novel tools and approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention for children and adolescents at risk of TB disease. This article describes the progress that has been made and the gaps that remain in addressing TB among children and adolescents while also highlighting pragmatic approaches and the role of multisectoral partnerships in facilitating integration of innovations into routine program practice.

19.
Healthcare ; 10(4):712, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1809823

ABSTRACT

Background: Rhythm step training (RST) for sensorimotor dual tasks is in the spotlight as it provides physical activity that is fun and allows participants to express various and creative movements, although it lacks a scientific evidence base. Therefore, this study was to investigate how RST affects the physical and cognitive functions of adolescents. Materials and Methods: A total of sixty-six female middle-schoolers were divided into non-exercise group (control group, CON, n = 22), step training group (STG, n = 22), and rhythm step training group (RSTG, n = 22). To verify the combined effects of music-based rhythm and exercise, the program was conducted for 45 min/session a day, three times a week for 12 weeks. Results: RST scores increased significantly in the STG and RSTG compared to the CON after 12 weeks. Specifically, the Δ% of RST scores in the RSTG (11.44%) was higher than those of STG (9.01%) and CON (3.91%). By the end of the experiment, the power (p < 0.001), agility (p < 0.001), muscle endurance (p < 0.001), dynamic or static balance (p < 0.001), and gait velocity (p < 0.001) of RSTG were significantly improved compared to the others. The Δ% of all variables in RSTG was higher than those of the CON or STG. In addition, the verbal memory (p < 0.001) and attention (p < 0.001) of cognitive function were significantly improved in RSTG. Specifically, there was more of an increase in Δ% of RSTG for verbal memory (7.52%) and attention (10.33%) than in the CON (verbal memory, 3.34%;attention, 5.83%) or STG (verbal memory, 5.85%;attention, 5.43%). Conclusions: This study confirms that RST had a positive effect on the physical and cognitive functions of female middle-schoolers. We propose that rhythmic exercise combined with music is beneficial for adolescents’ physical and cognitive health.

20.
Healthcare ; 10(4):702, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1809822

ABSTRACT

Many side effects of smartphone addiction have been reported, such as a lack of sleep, obesity, and poor concentration. However, the relationship between physical activity (PA) and smartphone addiction has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between physical activity and smartphone addiction among 53,534 Korean adolescents using raw data from the 16th (2020) Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBS). The dependent variables were the general user group, potential risk user group, and high-risk user group for smartphone addiction. The independent variables were moderate PA (over 5 days per week), vigorous PA (over 3 days per week), and strength exercise (over 3 days per week). Sex, body mass index (BMI), school grade, academic achievement, sleep satisfaction, depression, loneliness, and stress were selected as confounding variables. A complex sample logistic regression analysis was performed. Potential smartphone addiction risk users showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.423 (p < 0.001), 1.379 (p < 0.001), and 1.383 (p < 0.001) based on general users participating in moderate PA, vigorous PA, and strength exercise, respectively. High-risk users showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.475 (p < 0.001), 1.484 (p < 0.001), and 1.619 (p < 0.001), respectively. In conclusion, to prevent smartphone addiction among Korean adolescents, participation in moderate PA for more than five days a week, vigorous PA for more than three days a week, or strength exercise for more than three days a week is considered effective.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL