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1.
Agrarian perspectives XXXI ; Proceedings of the 31st International Scientific Conference:Prague, Czech Republic, 14-15 September 2022 2022, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2168783

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has become the cause of one of the greatest crises in the modern history of the global economy, including the agri-food sector. Business suspension and administrative restrictions on movement worsened business conditions and affected both the demand and supply of food products. On the other hand, state aid improved the financial liquidity of enterprises and limited the risk of their bankruptcy. In order to assess the impact of this situation, using the Altman Z-score index, changes in the level of bankruptcy risk in the 1000 largest enterprises in the agri-food sector in Poland in 2018-2020 were examined. The results indicated that during the period of the impact of the pandemic in 2020, the changes in bankruptcy risk were mild. Moreover, the directions of these changes varied depending on the section in which the enterprises operated. In 2020, out of the sixteen examined sections, the Z-score increased in nine and decreased in seven. The risk of bankruptcy decreased the most in the following sections: production of bread and bakery products and production of animal feed. It grew the most in the following sections: processing, preserving fruit and vegetables and refining fats and oils.

2.
Sustainability ; 14(10), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2200744

ABSTRACT

Food security (FS) is one of the most elusive and sought-after objectives worldwide. Securing a country's self-sufficiency - in the current COVID-19 pandemic era, more than ever - has become a prioritized mission. In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, FS is adversely affected by, among others, the scarcity of freshwater, harsh environment, regional conflicts, and rising temperatures. Following the eruption of the COVID-19 pandemic, exporters placed export restrictions on key food crops, affecting FS in import dependent regions, such as the MENA countries and, more specifically, the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This paper presented a conceptual framework on the key enablers for the UAE agri-food supply chains to obtain the necessary resiliency to achieve FS, through improving policy-making capacity. The proposed approach started with the assessment of the main vulnerabilities of the food system in a global context;from there, the factors that influence vulnerability were investigated, identifying the main global drivers that affect the local food systems, focusing on the UAE. The proposed framework was applied for the design and implementation of an early warning system concerning FS-related incidents.

3.
Scientific Papers Series Management, Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development ; 22(3):743-752, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2147727

ABSTRACT

Due to their characteristics, short food supply chains have an increasingly important role to play in local supply networks as a viable and sustainable alternative to conventional agri-food sector supply chains. They are considered innovative while providing many economic, social, environmental, health, and cultural benefits to small producers and, consequently, local communities. Basing on the specific scientific literature, these benefits are briefly presented in this paper. The contribution of short food supply chains to the improvement of food systems has become relevant in the context of sanitary crisis generated by COVID-19. More precisely, even if the global chains managed to overcome this unforeseen shock, the vulnerabilities appeared and were evident. Accordingly, in our opinion, the development philosophy of local agri-economy needs to change: the conventional agriculture has to coexist nearby the alternative agriculture, while not provoking damages each other. The chains interconnecting final producers and consumers have to be integrated into a socio-economic ecosystem with durable and sustainable basis, while the agri-food market needs to adapt to these new requirements.

4.
Non-conventional in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2124816

ABSTRACT

The Covid19 pandemic that started in early 2020 has affected the whole world and affected the way we live, work, travel etc. Like this, there have also been big influences on the whole agri-food value network and hence on agri-food clusters in the Danube Region. A major objective of the DS3C project is to foster transnational cluster cooperation in agri-food and providing policy recommendations in that regard, which must reflect and consider all the developments initiated or promoted by the global pandemic. Hence, it was conducted a transnational analysis of Covid19 impacts on agri-food clusters.

5.
Economia Agro Alimentare/Food Economy ; 24(2), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2124382

ABSTRACT

Four studies from the 29th Annual Conference of the Italian Association of Agri-Food Economics are presented. These studies analyse the Italian agri-food system from four different angles: the circular economy, retailer supply of sustainable food, food consumer preferences, and transaction costs. They are complementary in dealing with sustainability and the COVID-19 impact on the agri-food supply chain, and offer interesting new perspectives on these topics.

6.
Land ; 11(6), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2055289

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the world economy since 2020. This study analyzed the impact of the pandemic on innovative agri-food companies from different branches of agro-industrial activity located in Extremadura (Spain). The main aim of this study was to determine which activities have been most affected. Differences between actions and changes made depending on the nature of the product, process, or services were also evaluated. The information was obtained from an online questionnaire in which the research questions were posed (what consequences, actions, or changes has the pandemic had on the development of firms' activities?). Data were analyzed descriptively, and a statistical study was conducted on the existence or absence of independence between effects and actions based on the branches of activity of agri-food industries. The main results showed that companies' financial (decrease in turnover and reduction/displacement of product demand) and operational functioning (difficulty in marketing activities and standstill/decline in the fiscal year) has mainly been affected. In response, innovative agro-industries have acted regarding their processes (increased ICT use and new marketing strategies) and procedures (implementation of stricter hygienic-sanitary protocols and reorganization of activities and personnel) to deal with the negative effects on their activities. In general, all agro-industrial branches have incorporated changes in their products and services, mainly by providing new and better customer benefits, and improving product formats and forms of payment to suppliers. These findings provide information for the regional public administration in the development of initiatives that mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic and favor the implementation of actions that help the adaptation of agro-industrial activities. Agricultural policies should incorporate specialized measures to ensure the global sustainability of the food and agriculture system and the supply and production.

7.
AgriFutures Australia Publication 2021. (21-129):vi + 16 pp. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2046142

ABSTRACT

What the report is about: The Rice Industry Leadership Program 2017-2020 was extended due to COVID-19. This report outlines all the programs that have been completed. Who is the report targeted at?: The AgriFutures Rice Advisory Panel. Where are the relevant industries located in Australia?: The rice-growing regions of southern NSW. Background: For the past decade, the rice industry has been evolving and growing to understand the importance of strong leadership. It does this through becoming an industry that truly believes in its people and their ability to innovate, grow and adjust to changes brought about by water reform, pressure from other crops and permanent horticulture, climate variability and market pressures. Our leaders are not only seen as leaders in the rice industry, but also as leaders within their communities, of which the rice industry is very proud. It hopes these leaders continue to influence not only industry but also regional communities. Recognising the opportunity to continue the great work in leadership, the Ricegrowers' Association (RGA) applied for and received $367,960 in funding from the Australian Government's $5 million Leadership in Agricultural Industries Fund. In addition to federal funding, the RGA was also supported by key organisations in the rice industry: AgriFutures Australia, SunRice, the Rice Marketing Board of the State of NSW, and Rice Extension. This $662,760 funding enabled the Rice Industry Leadership Program 2017-2020 to be established. Aim/objectives: The RGA believes that developing leaders is an investment in the future of our industry. The objective of the Rice Industry Leadership Program 2017-2020 was to provide an opportunity for potential leaders of our industry to undertake training to develop their leadership skills. The development of strong and effective industry leaders helps the rice industry to structurally adjust to the many drivers of change influencing the industry, and to continue its economic, environmental and innovation success. Through strong leadership, the industry is better positioned to embrace the opportunities and challenges facing the industry. Methods used: Methods used through the Rice Leadership Program consisted of residential training workshops, short face-to-face workshops, online learning opportunities, and social networking events. Results/findings: Over the duration of the program, 163 people completed leadership programs. The key findings for this project illustrated a need for professional development opportunities across the rice industry, the broad agricultural sector and, in particular, our regional communities. Because people working in agriculture often find it to be isolating, the social interaction and networking in this program was a key to its success. A limited number of people in the industry are willing to take on leadership roles outside their own business. This finding will affect industry stakeholders because there is a risk of not having the right people to lead the businesses and industry in the future. Implications for relevant stakeholders: Through this program's strong commitment to investing in future leaders, we were able to improve the industry's ability to pursue initiatives in the public interest, and to deliver direct and indirect benefits for community. Throughout the leadership program, a common value that has been reinforced is the important role the rice industry plays economically, socially and environmentally for local businesses, communities, and the broader agricultural and irrigation industries. The Rice Industry Leadership Program has made progress towards addressing the leadership needs of those respective organisations and communities. Recommendations: We strongly believe the Rice Industry Leadership Program has helped to ensure the future success of the rice industry by delivering high-quality leadership development opportunities for growers and industry associates. The RGA has built a strong brand over the past 10 years for delivering leadership programs. We recommend that the RGA continue t

8.
Economics of Agriculture ; 69(2):441-453, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1964484

ABSTRACT

Agroindustry is traditionally an unavoidable category in the analysis of any economy. The objectives of the research are to present a summary of the profit and financial positions of agro industrial companies in the period of COVID-19, and to analyze financial vitality in the context of liquidity of manufacture of food products and beverages, in the year 2020 and 2019, as well as its' average five-year parameters. The findings show that the liquidity indicators are below the desirable norms and overall liquidity assessment is unfavorable. Further analysis by subsectors has revealed differences in profit positions by subsectors, due to different effects of the crisis, so the findings can serve as an incentive to review decisions of all stakeholders, including economic creators' policy.

9.
International Journal of Agriculture Innovation, Technology and Globalisation ; 2(4):351-371, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1923726

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19, the agro-industrial sector continues to prove a significant role in the contribution of Vietnamese economic power. It is essential to be aware of the performance-competition relationship which helps agro-process enterprises improve their business and respond quickly to market changes. We implemented an input-output-performance analysis by employing a qualitative case-study approach at four large manufacturing exporters by adapting the iceberg model and 'philosophy' of technovation performance. As a result, we found that the input-output process of technovation occurs mutually from the export competitive advantages in both direct and indirect ways. Moreover, by assigning four cases to one of four concordant positions, the matrix of technovation performance-competitiveness as an analytical tool was established, helping managers allocate resources and capital to select and build their own business strategy. The implications for theory and managerial practices are explained and presented.

10.
56th Croatian & 16th International Symposium on Agriculture, Vodice, Croatia ; 2021.
Article in Croatian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904944

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper is to contribute knowledge about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on behavior and changes in the food market and to assess the level of resilience of the agri-food sector to the coronavirus pandemic, analyzing its impact on commodity prices and focusing on supply chain and values. The paper presents an overview of literature data related to the topic of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the food market, ie the food chain. Analyzing FAO Food Price Index (ICH) from 2015 to 2020, the average ICH is growing slightly on average in 2020 (5.3%) compared to 2015. Looking at individual commodity groups, more or less oscillations were observed in all of them, and the increase in the price index refers to dairy products, vegetable oils and cereals, while a decrease was observed in meat and sugar. If we analyze more closely the movement of ICH and commodity groups in the period from March 2020 to March 2021, we can see an increase in the ICH average and all individual commodity groups. The increase is most significant in vegetable oils and sugars. The trade of purchased and sold agricultural products in Croatia from 2018 to 2020 slightly increased in 2020 compared to the previous (non-pandemic) year. Unlike other sectors, the food sector, as part of the national critical infrastructure, remained operational throughout the supply chain during the pandemic. As this crisis is unlikely to remain a one-off, further research efforts should focus on considering its long-term impacts, such as negative impacts on job security, supply chains and globalization.

11.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):1-2, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904450

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the operations of many farm and food businesses across Louisiana. Producers had to adapt to changes or closures of market outlets, including farmers markets, farm-to-school programs, and restaurants. Using data collected from an online survey, this research examines pre- and post-pandemic marketing channels and challenges faced by food producers.

12.
New Medit ; 21(1):149-160, 2022.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904161

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 had a negative effect economically and socially in Tunisia, as illustrated by the highest mortality rate recorded in Africa in March 2020 and the economic growth rate estimated at -9.3% by the Central Bank of Tunisia in 2020. The main cause of this situation is the quarantine and the sudden halt of several activities resulting in the drop in domestic demand and the loss of Tunisia's main trading partners. The agricultural sector, and particularly small and family farms, forced to align with the quarantine measures since March 2020, have suffered the full impact of Covid-19. Indeed, the pandemic crisis put a strain on food supply chains: a complex network of interactions involving farmers, agricultural inputs, processing plants, retailers, and others. This study proposes to analyze the impact of the sanitary crisis, and of the national lockdown measures imposed since March 22, 2020, on small farms in the most vulnerable rural areas of Tunisia and on the functioning of small local chains. A survey based on the approach of the Participatory Systemic Rapid Diagnosis (PSRD) was conducted during the month of June 2020 just after 2 months of containment, with a sample of 240 farmers operating in local channels and distributed from north to south of Tunisia on 6 governorates the poorest and most vulnerable, according to the economic development indicator and poverty line. The results of this survey have shown that the health crisis has resulted in major disruptions to agricultural activities mainly at the level of supply chains of raw materials (treatment products, fertilizers, seeds, animal feed, ... etc.), and marketing channels due to the closure of weekly markets (leafy vegetables, small livestock, ... etc.). This dysfunction of the production system and local agricultural sectors has not only had an impact on farmers' incomes, which have dropped significantly compared to a normal year, but has also disrupted the functioning of the entire food system at the local level. Consequently, the need for a new model of production, processing, and marketing of food products is necessary.

13.
MAP Newsletter ; 02:1-35, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1887500

ABSTRACT

The year 2020 marked one of the biggest recessions in global economic activity and world trade. During this period, the EU economy contracted by 6% and its international trade followed a similar downward trend - EU exports of goods decreased by 9% and imports by 12%, compared to 2019. By contrast, EU international trade in agri-food reported a slight growth. Over the course of 2020, the value of EU agri-food exports increased to 184.3 billion (a growth of 1.4% compared to 2019), while the value of imports rose to 122.2 billion (a growth of 0.5%). As a result, the EU further reinforced its leading position among the world's biggest exporters. On the import side, the EU has become the third largest importer after the US and China. The contraction in global trade was accompanied by increasing prices of food, including commodities as evidenced by the increases reflected in the FAO Global Price Index. The EU exports a wide range of products from all parts of the value chain which demonstrates the competitiveness of the EU agri-food sector in a variety of product classes ranging from commodities to highly processed food industry products. EU imports, on the other hand, are clearly dominated by basic agricultural food and feed products, which represent about 75% of all imports. Looking at product categories, exports of pig meat and wheat strongly contributed to the increase in EU overall agri-food exports. Conversely, spirits and liqueurs as well as wine are among the sectors that experienced a difficult period for a number of reasons (e.g. the COVID pandemic, US retaliatory tariffs). The growth in EU agri-food imports was mainly driven by increases in import values for oilseeds, other than soya beans;fatty acids and waxes, palm oil, fruit including tropical fruit, and soya beans. China, Switzerland and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region were the major growth destinations for EU agri-food exports in 2020. The value of EU exports fell most to the United States, Turkey, Singapore and Japan. In terms of imports, Canada grew significantly as a source for the EU imports. By contrast, EU imports declined most in value from the United Kingdom, Ukraine and the United States. In 2020, the UK has become the EU's most important partner in agri-food trade, with a share of 23% in total EU agri-food exports and 13% in total imports. With EU exports and imports both decreasing, its trade surplus with the US increased by 2% when compared to 2019, as falls on the imports side were stronger. China became the top destination for US agri-food exports. EU agri-food exports to China were primarily driven by continued record high sales of pig meat which increased by 74%. Pig meat and meat offal - the latter mainly comprised of products originating from pigs - accounted for over 40% of EU exports to China in 2020, demonstrating the importance of this market for the pig meat sector. Brazil's exports to China continued to increase in 2020, absorbing 35% of its total agri-food exports. Combined agri-food exports from Brazil to the EU and the US now account for half of Brazilian exports to China. In 2020, Brazil supplied 50% of extra-EU demand for soya beans and 40% for oilcakes. Wheat continued to be the leading EU export product to Africa with a 23% share of the EU's total export basket, whereas cocoa beans dominate in the EU imports from Africa, with the same share of 23%. Most African countries benefit from duty-free, quota-free access to the EU market under the "Everything But Arms" scheme and for many of them Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) or other trade agreements with the EU are applied, encouraging regional cooperation and trade. In 2020, the EU applied 45 free trade agreements (FTAs) with 77 partners. The share of agri-food trade under preferential agreements is also expanding and in 2021, it accounted for 31% and 41% of total EU agri-food exports and imports, respectively. The value of EU agri-food trade under preferential agreements expanded more in relative terms compared to total EU agri-food trade. EU agri-food ex

14.
Policy Brief - PLAAS|2021. (58):5 pp. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1870808

ABSTRACT

This policy brief draws from a study of agri-food system responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in Ghana. We examined how the pre-COVID-19 stresses in the agri-food system have interacted with the fallouts of the pandemic to reshape relationships among the key state and non-state actors and interest groups, and the implications for the agri-food system as a whole.

15.
Proceedings of the Crawford Fund ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1864062

ABSTRACT

Global food systems have gone through periodic transformations over the past sixty years: the Green Revolution, the Livestock Revolution, and the globalisation of food trade are some of the epochal events observed. The nature and magnitude of biosecurity risks have evolved with the rising intensity and complexity of agriculture and food systems. While transboundary crop pests continue to challenge global food security, zoonotic diseases are rising as risks to human health. The global movement of goods and people has further expanded biosecurity risks, in terms of scale and intensity of impacts. Rising global temperatures will further exacerbate the risks associated with transboundary pest and zoonotic diseases. COVID-19 provides an important example of food systems impacts from a global health shock. Policy and management opportunities for managing biosecurity risks and rebuilding food system resilience need urgent assessment and global action.

16.
Economic Insights Trends and Challenges ; 3:73-82, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1836670

ABSTRACT

In the last few years, but even more so given the context the COVID-19 pandemic, a large series of global and local changes have occurred in all areas of life, including the way food is perceived and procured. The orientation towards local food as a preferred choice has gained more followers which are interested in economic, social and environmental effects of the way the world uses all kinds of resources to meet its nutritional needs. Local food involves a special kind of food systems approach in terms of determining factors and resulting implications for all actors involved. The paper deals with emphasizing different aspects of local food systems, including both agri-food producers and consumer's drivers together with the effects of rethinking the way people choose to procure their food. The link to sustainable development is clearly highlighted using the multiple implications of this agri-food system upon different sectors and dimensions.

17.
Textual Analisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano ; 77(26), 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1835448

ABSTRACT

The agri-food system depends on global variations such as economic changes that generate insecurity or food shortfall, in addition to the current health emergency that mainly affects small producers in rural areas. This work reviews the conditions of rural producers of Xochimilco in Mexico City and proposes a structure that promotes the viability of the agri-food system. The study was carried out in two stages, the ethnographic method was first used and, then from the Systemic Approach, the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) in complementarity with Viable System Model (VSM) was applied to contextualize the effects of the current health emergency in this area. The results show that these communities are facing the pandemic from their limited capacities, so mechanisms and organizational structures are needed to make food systems robust to meet the challenges that their environment presents. It is proposed that the necessary linkage should be based on systemic models capable of managing the complexity of rural systems, such as the joint use of SSM and VSM, which through its systemic functions process environmental complexity and improve adaptation to the environment to ensure their survival.

18.
Textual Analisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano ; 77, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1835445

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic destructured global agrifood supply chains, affecting all local rural enterprises. This paper proposes to redefine them as social structures that generate hetero-reactive capacities for linkage and social innovation, with the aim of seeking strategies for the recovery of the social fabric of local rural economies. For this purpose, social network analysis was used. The results showed different compositions in the funding of resources and social inputs. It was concluded that these linkage structures allow the identification of resilience strategies for the Mexican agrifood sector.

19.
Aqua Culture Asia Pacific ; 18(2):40-40, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1812559

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic has had major impacts on the agri-food sector, contributing to supply chain challenges and accelerating the adoption of new technology and environmental sustainability practices. The results within our 2022 Alltech Agri-Food Outlook reinforce our confidence and optimism about the future of the agri-food sector. We see the resilience of the agri-food sector against the challenges of COVID-19, such as disease and supply chain disruption, and even more importantly, there is evidence of growth, modernisation and the adoption of more sustainable practices occurring in parallel.

20.
MECAS Studies - International Sugar Organization|2020. ((20)08):ii + 43 pp. ; 2020.
Article in English, French, Spanish, Russian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1786960

ABSTRACT

China is one of the largest economies in the world, second only to the US, with exponential growth over the past few decades, its annual GDP growth rate between 2008 and 2018 averaged 8.1%. Although, the pace of growth has slowed in recent years, it remains on a high level compared to many other developing countries in the world. China's economy has experienced a number of structural changes during recent years which have also had an impact on the food and agricultural sector. The decline of the working age population in rural areas, which started in 2015, together with increasing real wages requires a different approach when it comes to rural labour. China, in its drive towards self-sufficiency has achieved remarkable results in the expansion of agricultural production. But some of this increase has been at the expense of the sustainable use of the country's natural resources. Agriculture is the biggest user of natural resources such as land and water. These factors could affect the further growth and development of the agricultural sector. New policies, including new qualitative approaches, such as mechanisation, fertilisation of exhausted arable lands and innovations in agriculture could be a positive driver for future development. Globally, China is a substantial growth market, including its domestic sugar market. Domestic production, consumption, imports and policy dynamics are all key to the outlook for the Chinese sugar balance. This study aims to uncover China's importance in the world sugar economy and explore the latest developments in the industry in order to make forward projections of the country's sugar balance. In 2018, China cemented its position as the world's largest sugar net-importer, being the largest importer with total purchases of 5.2 mln tonnes of sugar from the world market. Although per capita consumption remains low, at 11.3 kg in 2018, as against a world average of 22.6 kg, China's sugar consumption demonstrated sustainable growth during ten consecutive years, from 2008 to 2018, averaging 2% annually. Declining production during the same ten years period by 2% annually was offset by higher imports with a growth rate (2008-2018) averaging 26% annually. In 2020, the new uncertainty owing to the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted global market developments in different areas, as separate reports have shown. This study will present a general overview of China's sugar market, with an update on the recent market situation, the country's policy on sugar production and governmental support of the sugar industry, to demonstrate its importance in the world sugar economy, and show principal changes of its position on the world sugar map. A major aspect of the study will consist of the latest update on China's position in the global sugar market, an assessment of the recent policy trends with regards to domestic sugar production, the dynamics of sugar consumption, including recent trends and prospects in the use of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners, development in sugar trade, and finally, discover the main country's policy changes in terms of sugar market support.

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