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1.
Pharmaceutical Journal ; 309(7966), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2196676
2.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 9(Supplement 2):S639-S640, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2189865

ABSTRACT

Background. Effectively interrupting the source of transmission is a critical step in ending the HIV epidemic. COMEBACK (NCT04519970) is a 48-week single-center study in Chicago implemented in September 2020, with its main objectives to reengage lost-to-care patients and rapidly reinitiate ART to promote VS and favorable PROs. Methods. Adults off ART >=2 weeks, without history of significant B/F/TAF resistance or renal impairment, were rapidly started on B/F/TAF upon reengagement after same day collection of baseline labs and PROs. A retention screening assessment was used to stratify participants into case management (CM) tiers: Minimal, Moderate, or Advanced. An acuity assessment tool was adapted to determine whether participants needed additional support based on retention and VS. Currently, 80 of the expected 100 subjects are enrolled and 55 have reached the 24-week timepoint. Baseline and 6-month endpoints were analyzed for these participants. Results. At baseline (N=55), median age was 34 years (range, 24-62), with 92.6% Black and 72.2% cisgender male. Median CD4+ was 338 cells/mm3, with a median viral load 7,402copies/mL, (range, < 40-333,350, 16.3% VS). Median time off ART was 2.6 months (range, 0.5-243). For CM, participants were stratified into Minimal (71%) and Moderate (29%) tiers;none were identified as Advanced. Table 1 reflects tier shifts through 24 weeks. Shifts inCMintensity differs from the HIV adherence self-efficacy PRO completed within 24 weeks, indicating that at least 50% underestimated their need to integrate and maintain adherence to ART treatment. Forty of 55 participants (72.7%) were retained-in-care at 6 months, with VS in 61.8% (N=34/55) by intention-to-treat and 85% (N=34/40) by observed analysis. No resistance to B/F/TAF was detected through 6 months. Note: The table reflects patients retained on study at their week 24 endpoint. Conclusion. VS was high for participants retained-in-care, but lapses in retention and shifts toward more intense CM were likely due to social determinants of health challenges, including incarceration, housing insecurity, and COVID-19-related disruptions in healthcare.

3.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 9(Supplement 2):S599-S600, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2189847

ABSTRACT

Background. People living with HIV (PLHIV) suffer from adverse outcomes of metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly with the stay-at-home status in 2020, resulted in physical inactivity and dietary changes leading to increases in weight and body mass index (BMI). Methods. This retrospective observational chart review evaluated PLHIV at an infectious diseases clinic with a documented BMI from 2017 to 2020. Data on patients' demographics, comorbidities, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) as of 2020 and the yearly values of BMI, A1c, and LDL from 2017 to 2020 were collected. Results. Among 256 HIV-infected persons, mean age+/-SD was 48.5+/-13.1 (median= 51;Q1-Q3: 39.5-57.5;range: 20-78) and 95 (37%) were female. Mean BMI were 28.19+/-6.32, 28.44+/-5.95, 28.57+/-5.91, and 29.00+/-6.09 for 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 respectively. Unadjusted and adjusted analysis showed a significant difference in BMI across time, where the mean BMI in 2020 was significantly higher than in 2017 (p< 0.0001), 2018 (p< 0.0001), and 2019 (p< 0.0001). Furthermore, for each consecutive year prior to 2019, there was no significant difference in mean BMI (2017 vs. 2018, p< 0.3464;2018 vs. 2019, p< 0.4671;2017 vs. 2019, p< 0.0861). There was a significant difference in A1c when adjusting for age, sex, race, and ART (Geometric Mean: 5.64, 5.68, 5.68, 5.78 for 2017 through 2020), with the visit year 2020 being significantly higher than 2017 (p< 0.003) and 2019 (p< 0.023) but not 2018 (p< 0.092). There were no significant differences in annual LDL using the same variables for adjustment. Body mass index (BMI) increased over time from 2017 to 2020 Mean BMI were 28.2+/-6.3, 28.4+/-5.9, 28.6+/-5.9, and 29.0+/-6.1 for 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 respectively. Pairwise comparison of BMI from 2017 to 2020 Unadjusted and adjusted analysis showed a significant difference in BMI across time, where the mean BMI in 2020 was significantly higher than in 2017 (p<0.0001), 2018 (p<0.0001), and 2019 (p<0.0001). Furthermore, for each consecutive year prior to 2019, there was no significant difference in mean BMI (2017 vs. 2018, p<0.3464;2018 vs. 2019, p<0.4671;2017 vs. 2019, p<0.0861). Conclusion. Among PLHIV at our clinic, there was a substantial BMI increase in 2020, possibly due to the stay-at-home status in early 2020. A previous study utilized questionnaires to estimate the weight change in this patient population but this is the first report of documented BMI in the clinic setting. It is important to note that the magnitude of these differences was small and should be interpreted with caution. On the other hand, depending on a person's initial height and weight, a one-unit change in BMI may translate to a substantial weight gain, which can be meaningful.

4.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 9(Supplement 2):S540, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2189826

ABSTRACT

Background. Multi-month dispensing (MMD) of antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases logistical burdens on HIV clinics and patients, which is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic. HIV programs are scaling-up 6-month dispensing (6MD), but the impact on viral suppression (VS) has not been well-documented in programmatic settings. Methods. The African Cohort Study (AFRICOS) is an international observational study of people living with HIV (PLWH) receiving HIV care. In Nigeria and Kenya, this includes 6MD. Participants undergo semiannual viral load quantification and were included in analysis if they had complete data, documentation of MMD (self-reported) and at least two follow-up visits after initiating MMD. In stratified analyses for each country, we used multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) comparing VS < 50 copies/mL among those who received 6MD to those given 3-5 months dispensing (3-5MD) of ART. Analyses were adjusted for age, education, employment, distance to clinic, duration on ART, ART regimen (TLD vs other) and self-reported ART adherence (>= 1 missed dose in past 30 days). Results. Between January 30, 2020, when MMD data was first collected, and September 1, 2021, 1176 PLWH in Kenya and 272 in Nigeria had at least one visit;285 participants from Kenya, totaling 442 visits, and 177 participants from Nigeria, totaling 382 visits, met criteria and were included in analysis. At most recent visit, VS < 50 copies/mL was documented in 266 (93.3%) participants from Kenya and 125 (70.6%) participants from Nigeria. Among the 35 participants given 6MD in Kenya, compared to 250 participants given 3-5MD, the aOR for VS was 0.42 (95% CI: 0.13-1.37);among the 91 participants given 6MD in Nigeria, compared to the 86 participants given 3-5MD, the aOR was 3.01 (95%CI: 1.70-5.31). Conclusion. The positive association between 6MD and VLS in Nigeria, as compared to 3-5MD, should prompt more aggressive scale-up of 6MD. The lack of an association in Kenya merits further investigation, but likely relates to high overall VS and few participants on 6MD. Updated data from specific geographic and demographic sub-populations is needed to inform programming as 6MD is scaled.

5.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 9(Supplement 2):S535-S536, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2189825

ABSTRACT

Background. Long-acting injectable antiretroviral therapy (LAI) is an exciting alternative to daily oral ART. Less frequent dosing afforded by LAI may be especially pertinent for persons who inject drugs (PWID), who experience more HIV-related mortality largely driven by inadequate ART adherence. We used the Consolidated Framework on Implementation Research (CFIR) to characterize determinants of LAI implementation, focusing on use among PWID, in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods. We conducted in-depth interviews with HIV-infected PWID, ART providers, and policymakers using purposive sampling, recruiting respondents with diverse ART experience from public HIV/ART clinics and national regulatory agencies. Participants were briefed regarding LAI ART, including administration, effectiveness, side effects, and dosing frequency.Datawere coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results. We interviewed 19 PWID, 14 providers, and five policymakers (February-November, 2021). We identified recurrent themes in CFIR domains. Intervention(s): All informants were excited about LAI, citing convenience and discrete dosing as major facilitators. Surprisingly, provider concerns, including more frequent clinic visits and injection reactions, were rarely voiced by PWID who described monthly injections as similar to current visit frequency and cited 'high pain tolerance.' Outer: Providers and policymakers were eager to offer patients ART choice but were divided as to if LAI distribution should proceed with sub-population prioritization. Inner: Providers described personnel and clinic logistic concerns but were confident these could be addressed. Individual: Providers were motivated and confident in their ability to deliver LAI. Process: Transitions to new ART and provision of COVID-19 vaccines were frequently invoked by providers and policymakers as interventions informing LAI implementation. Figure Determinants of LAI ART implementation in Vietnam using the domains of the Consolidated Framework on Implementation Research Conclusion. Using CFIR, we identified multiple determinants of LAI implementation in Vietnam. Stakeholders agreed that LAI was feasible and acceptable. Medication tolerance and efficacy concerns highlight the importance of patient and provider education. Areas where stakeholders diverge should be considered in designing LAI implementation strategies.

6.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 9(Supplement 2):S468-S469, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2189756

ABSTRACT

Background. It is known that the pandemic increased the risk of severe illness from SARS-CoV-2 infection in immunocompromised patients as compared to the general public. To combat this issue, telemedicine was utilized in various settings, but there is very little data on the adequate continuity of care (COC) and sustainability of telehealth throughout the pandemic. There is even less data on the effects of the pandemic in special populations, such as people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH) and within the correctional setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate rates of HIV virologic suppression (VS) and the sustainability of telemedicine throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Methods. This was a retrospective, pre-post cohort study of PLWH who received antiretroviral therapy (ART) within Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) / University of Illinois Chicago telemedicine clinic between 3/2019 and 3/2021. Patients who were released from IDOC or reincarcerated during the study period were excluded. The primary endpoint compared the rate of HIV VS pre-, peri- and post-SARS-CoV-2 restrictions. Secondary endpoints included change in immunologic function pre-, peri- and post-SARS-CoV-2 restrictions, incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, number of hospitalizations, development of virologic failure, and change in ART post-pandemic. Other factors known to influence COC were also collected. Results. Of 320 patients screened, 225 were included. The majority were Black males (73.7%) and 95.1% had a CD4 T-cell count > 200 cells/mm3 at baseline. Approximately 88% of patients were on a single tablet regimen, with most receiving bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide. Rates of HIV VS are summarized in Figure 1 and secondary outcomes are summarized in table 1. Factors associated with disruption of COC included non-adherence to appointments (62.6%) and ART (4.4%). Conclusion. Results demonstrated that PLWH within IDOC had sustained VS and COC throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic with telemedicine. These results describe how the pandemic impacted PLWH in a correctional setting and future studies could contribute to creating national guidance for telemedicine models to streamline clinical practice.

7.
The Lancet Global Health ; 11(1):e16-e17, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2184814
8.
New Microbes and New Infections ; 51 (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2181855
9.
Journal of Virus Eradication ; 8(4) (no pagination), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2181184
10.
Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection ; Part 1. 55(6):1005-1012, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2180782

ABSTRACT

Background: To contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic, non-pharmacologic interventions, including lockdown and social distancing, may have adverse impact on access to HIV testing and care. This study investigated the impact of Covid-19 on HIV testing and care at a major hospital in Taiwan in 2020-2021. Method(s): The numbers of clients seeking anonymous HIV voluntary counseling and testing were compared 2 years before (2018-2019) and 2 years after Covid-19 outbreak (2020-2021). People living with HIV (PLWH) who sought care at the hospital during 2018-2021 were included to examine the status of HIV care delivery and disposition. Result(s): The annual number of HIV screening tests performed had significantly decreased from 2507 to 2794 in 2018 and 2019, respectively, to 2161 and 1737 in 2020 and 2021, respectively. The rate of discontinuation of HIV care among PLWH was 3.7% in 2019, which remained unchanged in 2020 (3.7%) and 2021 (3.8%). The respective percentage of annual plasma HIV RNA testing <2 times increased from 8.4% to 7.8% in 2018 and 2019 to 7.0% and 10.7% in 2020 and 2021, so was that of annual syphilis testing <2 times (10.1% and 8.8%-7.9% and 12.0%). The rates of plasma HIV RNA <200 copies/ml ranged from 97.0% to 98.1% in 2018-2021. Conclusion(s): During the Covid-19 pandemic, access to HIV counseling and testing was significantly limited. While the number of HIV-related testing decreased, the impact of Covid-19 on the continuity of antiretroviral therapy and viral suppression among PLWH appeared to be minimal in Taiwan. Copyright © 2022

11.
Rossiiskii Oftal'mologicheskii Zhurnal ; 15(4):121-125, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2204932

ABSTRACT

A clinical case of retinovasculitis with coronavirus infection COVID-19 involving a female patient in the late stage of HIV infection is reported. The patient had no antiretroviral therapy. Clinical features of eye changes, their severity and dynamics influenced by the ophthalmic therapy were revealed. A relationship between the course of COVID-19 and the state of immunodeficiency causes by HIV was found. As a result of the long disease duration and the complications, the patient died. © 2022, Real Time LLC. All rights reserved.

12.
J Infect Dis ; 2022 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2189156

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection may be associated with worse clinical outcomes in people with HIV (PWH). We report anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses in COVID-19 hospitalized patients in Durban, South Africa during the second SARS-CoV-2 infection wave dominated by the Beta (B.1.351) variant. METHODS: Thirty-four participants with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were followed up with weekly blood sampling to examine antibody levels and neutralization potency against SARS-CoV-2 variants. Participants included 18 PWH, of whom 11 were HIV viremic. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 specific antibody concentrations were generally lower in viremic PWH relative to virologically suppressed PWH and HIV-negative participants and neutralization of the Beta variant was 4.9-fold lower in viremic PWH. Most HIV-negative participants and ART-suppressed PWH also neutralized the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant, whereas the majority of viremic PWH did not. CD4 counts <500 cells/µL were associated with lower frequencies of IgG and IgA seroconversion. In addition, there was a high correlation between a surrogate virus neutralization test and live virus neutralization against ancestral SARS-CoV-2 virus in both PWH and HIV-negative individuals, but correlation decreased for the Beta variant neutralization in PWH. CONCLUSIONS: HIV viremia was associated with reduced Beta variant neutralization. This highlights the importance of HIV suppression in maintaining an effective SARS-CoV-2 neutralization response.

13.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2180762

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the impact of the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV services in Taiwan. METHODS: An online, cross-sectional survey was conducted among people living with HIV (PLWH), individuals at risk of HIV infection (IAR), and service prescribers between 20th October and 30th November, 2020. Representatives from patient advocacy groups were interviewed. RESULTS: In total, 66 PLWH, 104 IAR, and 32 prescribers from Taiwan completed the survey. Mild to moderate disruptions to HIV-related services (including medical consultation, HIV-related testing, and medications) were found by the survey, with IAR appearing more affected than PLWH. Nine (13.6%) PLWH and 31 (29.8%) IAR reported disruptions in hospital/clinic visits and two (3.0%) PLWH and 25 (24.0%) IAR reported decreased frequency of HIV testing. Similar observations were also made by four patient advocacy group representatives interviewed. Telehealth services were received by only limited proportions of PLWH and IAR who participated in the survey. CONCLUSION: HIV services in Taiwan were not severely affected by the initial wave of COVID-19, but notable disruptions were still observed in HIV screening and prevention services. Multi-pronged strategies, including telehealth services, are warranted to overcome new challenges in HIV care in the COVID-19 era.

14.
Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies ; 34(1/2):73-96, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2124619

ABSTRACT

Can visual interaction with artwork prompt healing? Can the brain recover from traumatic experiences and help heal the whole body? Since the 1940s, art therapists have claimed that the production of art can help heal past traumas. Similarly, occupational therapists have employed techniques from arts and crafts since the end of World War II to retrain soldiers helping them recover from the trauma of war. The global Covid-19 pandemic has caused health-related and psychological problems-isolation, increased anxiety, and fear-for people of all ages, with the rates of such traumas affecting children tripling over the past two years. According to the Nebraska-based quilting company, Accuquilt, during the first six months of pandemic isolation in 2020, sales more than doubled as new customers showed a desire to participate in arts and crafts from home. This essay explores various approaches to the arts to determine how art may restore dignity and health following traumatic experiences.

15.
Discoveries (Craiova) ; 10(2): e150, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145539

ABSTRACT

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) poses a major health problem around the globe, resulting in hundred-thousands of deaths from AIDS and over a million new infections annually. Although the standard treatment of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, has proven effective in preventing HIV transmission, it is unsuitable for worldwide use due to its substantial costs and frequent adverse effects. Besides promoting HIV/AIDS awareness through education, there is hardly an alternative for inhibiting the spread of the disease. One promising approach is the development of an HIV vaccine. Unfortunately, the high variability of envelope proteins from HIV subtypes, their frequency of mutation and the lack of fully understanding the mechanisms of protection against the virus constitute an obstacle for vaccine development. Efforts for developing successful anti-HIV vaccines have been underway for decades now, with little success. Lately, significant progress has been made in adopting the novel mRNA vaccine approach as an anti-HIV strategy. mRNA vaccines received a great thrust during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, several mRNA-based HIV vaccines are undergoing clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy. This review offers an overview of the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV / AIDS, previous efforts of HIV vaccine development and introduces mRNA vaccines as a promising and potential game changing platform for HIV vaccination.

16.
Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases ; 100(4):14-21, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2120517

ABSTRACT

The objective: to study clinical and laboratory specific parameters of the COVID-19 course in patients with TB/HIV co-infection, to analyze changes in the lungs caused by COVID-19 in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and concurrent HIV infection. Subjects and Methods. 68 HIV-infected patients aged 18-66 years old were included in the study, they all were admitted to the Novosibirsk State Regional Clinical Tuberculosis Hospital, Novosibirsk, with confirmed COVID-19 from May 2020 to May 2021. Clinical manifestations, CD4 count and HIV RNA level, and the presence of secondary infections were assessed. Results. In patients with severe and profound immunodeficiency, coronavirus infection was more often mild to moderate, and in immunocompetent patients - moderate to severe. However, patients with profound immunodeficiency were at greater risk of an adverse outcome due to lymphohematogenic progression of tuberculosis and concurrent opportunistic infections. Conclusion. When diagnosing and treating COVID-19 in patients with comorbid HIV infection and tuberculosis, it is important to consider the form of tuberculosis and CD4+ count. © 2022 New Terra Publishing House. All rights reserved.

17.
Social Science & Medicine ; : 115567, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2120379

ABSTRACT

Rationale In 2020, nearly 40 million people lived with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) worldwide, of whom 70% were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Two-thirds of PLWHA reside in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of viral load suppression are often suboptimal and frequently attributed to low ART adherence. Strong pill-taking habits are often reported as a key strategy among those who successfully maintain medication adherence, yet not enough is known about the barriers and facilitators in SSA to pill-taking in response to the same contextual cue, which is a necessary step in the habit formation process. Objective To address this knowledge gap and to inform a subsequent intervention to promote context-dependent repetition, called anchoring, we used a formative qualitative approach to collect in-depth narratives about barriers and facilitators of the anchoring intervention for establishing ART pill-taking habits at the Mildmay Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Methods We conducted interviews with 25 randomly selected patients starting ART, 5 expert patients, and 10 providers at Mildmay, and performed a rapid analysis to inform the intervention in a timely manner. Results We found that pill taking in response to the same contextual cue, or anchor, was threatened by stigma and food insecurity and that the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated these barriers. We also determined that important linguistic changes were needed to the instructional materials and reminder messages in the subsequent intervention to avoid words and phrases with negative connotations for this target population. Conclusions Several important barriers and facilitators to context-dependent pill taking in Uganda were identified through our formative research that helped to inform important revisions to our subsequent intervention. These findings underscore the importance of understanding local barriers and facilitators when designing and planning interventions, particularly when implementing theory-based intervention approaches that have yet to be tested in a new setting.

18.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 25(10): e26018, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085050

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 stretched healthcare systems to their limits, particularly in settings with a pre-existing high burden of infectious diseases, including HIV and tuberculosis (TB). We studied the impact of COVID-19 on TB services at antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics in low- and middle-income countries. METHODS: We surveyed ART clinics providing TB services in the International Epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) consortium in Africa and the Asia-Pacific until July 2021 (TB diagnoses until the end of 2021). We collected site-level data using standardized questionnaires. RESULTS: Of 46 participating ART clinics, 32 (70%) were in Africa and 14 (30%) in the Asia-Pacific; 52% provided tertiary care. Most clinics (85%) reported disrupted routine HIV care services during the pandemic, both in Africa (84%) and the Asia-Pacific (86%). The most frequently reported impacts were on staff (52%) and resource shortages (37%; protective clothing, face masks and disinfectants). Restrictions in TB health services were observed in 12 clinics (26%), mainly reduced access to TB diagnosis and postponed follow-up visits (6/12, 50% each), and restrictions in TB laboratory services (22%). Restrictions of TB services were addressed by dispensing TB drugs for longer periods than usual (7/12, 58%), providing telehealth services (3/12, 25%) and with changes in directly observed therapy (DOT) (e.g. virtual DOT, 3/12). The number of TB diagnoses at participating clinics decreased by 21% in 2020 compared to 2019; the decline was more pronounced in tertiary than primary/secondary clinics (24% vs. 12%) and in sites from the Asia-Pacific compared to Africa (46% vs. 14%). In 2021, TB diagnoses continued to decline in Africa (-8%) but not in the Asia-Pacific (+62%) compared to 2020. During the pandemic, new infection control measures were introduced or intensified at the clinics, including wearing face masks, hand sanitation and patient triage. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic led to staff shortages, reduced access to TB care and delays in follow-up visits for people with TB across IeDEA sites in Africa and the Asia-Pacific. Increased efforts are needed to restore and secure ongoing access to essential TB services in these contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfectants , HIV Infections , Tuberculosis , Humans , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Developing Countries , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Tuberculosis/drug therapy , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Disinfectants/therapeutic use
19.
Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2069363

ABSTRACT

Background To contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic, non-pharmacologic interventions, including lockdown and social distancing, may have adverse impact on access to HIV testing and care. This study investigated the impact of Covid-19 on HIV testing and care at a major hospital in Taiwan in 2020-2021. Methods The numbers of clients seeking anonymous HIV voluntary counseling and testing were compared 2 years before (2018-2019) and 2 years after Covid-19 outbreak (2020-2021). People living with HIV (PLWH) who sought care at the hospital during 2018-2021 were included to examine the status of HIV care delivery and disposition. Results The annual number of HIV screening tests performed had significantly decreased from 2,507 and 2,794 in 2018 and 2019, respectively, to 2,161 and 1,737 in 2020 and 2021, respectively. The rate of discontinuation of HIV care among PLWH was 3.7% in 2019, which remained unchanged in 2020 (3.7%) and 2021 (3.8%). The respective percentage of annual plasma HIV RNA testing <2 times increased from 8.4% and 7.8% in 2018 and 2019 to 7.0% and 10.7% in 2020 and 2021, so was that of annual syphilis testing <2 times (10.1% and 8.8% to 7.9% and 12.0%). The rates of plasma HIV RNA <200 copies/ml ranged from 97.0% to 98.1% in 2018-2021. Conclusions During the Covid-19 pandemic, access to HIV counseling and testing was significantly limited. While the number of HIV-related testing decreased, the impact of Covid-19 on the continuity of antiretroviral therapy and viral suppression among PLWH appeared to be minimal in Taiwan.

20.
Drugs Context ; 112022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067166

ABSTRACT

The logistical management of an injectable therapy for the treatment of HIV can be expensive, time consuming, frustrating and riddled with barriers. In this Commentary, we describe our experiences to date with acquiring, storing, handling, administering and billing for long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine through four scenarios, each of which have presented their own unique obstacles and learning curves. At the time of writing, we have successfully transitioned four patients from the CUSTOMIZE trial to long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine. In doing so, we encountered a variety of barriers to acquiring, handling and administering the medication for both insured and uninsured patients; it is expensive, on a limited number of insurance formularies, and often requires a prior authorization from the provider. Cold-chain handling of the injectable therapy, along with individual patient characteristics, present barriers to management and administration of this therapy. Whilst a seemingly very attractive option for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults, long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine present a variety of challenges to pharmacists, providers and clinic staff on how to obtain it for and administer it to the patient. We plan to continue documenting our experiences, progress and successes, or lack thereof, in order to fine-tune our process and share with others.

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