Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 631
Filter
1.
Boletin de Malariologia y Salud Ambiental ; 62(2):251-259, 2022.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034476

ABSTRACT

Background: Invasive mechanical ventilation as a therapeutic strategy is not without complications. It is imperative to have protective ventilation parameters in those patients who are subjected to it. We aim to demonstrate whether mechanical power as a ventilatory parameter has prognostic validity for mortality in critically ill patients with prolonged invasive mechanical ventilation. Material and Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out of critically ill patients on prolonged invasive mechanical ventilation due to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome due to COVID-19 who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital Regional de Trujillo during the March 2020 to March 2021 period.

2.
GERMS ; 12(2):298-303, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033515

ABSTRACT

Introduction COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease that remains to be further investigated. Case report Here, we describe a case of COVID-19 in an octogenarian woman with comorbidities who slowly recovered during hospitalization, but died due to sudden cardiac death after 2 weeks of hospitalization. Her nasopharyngeal and anal swabs returned positive for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR on day 7 of hospitalization. The NGS showed possible intraindividual evolution of virus. The sample from the nasopharyngeal swab yielded a B.1470 variant classified as clade GH. This variant showed mutation in the spike gene D614G;N gene;NS3 gene;NSP2 gene and NSP12 gene. The sample from the anal swab showed similar mutation but with additional point mutation in spike gene S12F and was classified as B.1.465 variant. Conclusions The possibility of the gastrointestinal tract that served as reservoir for virus mutation accumulation should also be considered and the potential impact of viral fecal transmission in the environment should be further investigated.

3.
GERMS ; 12(2):292-297, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033514

ABSTRACT

Introduction Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) is one of four common human respiratory coronaviruses. It causes lower respiratory tract infections in young children, elderly and immunosuppressed people, which could result in fatal outcomes. In this time of pandemic, we want to highlight the importance of other coronaviruses infection besides SARS-CoV-2, especially in a patient with underlying conditions like acute lymphoblastic leukemia, receiving immunosuppressive therapy that could result in humoral secondary immunodeficiencies. Case report We present the case of a 44-year-old Colombian man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed HCoV-NL63 pulmonary infection after the first month of treatment with blinatumomab complicated with severe secondary hypogammaglobulinemia. HCoV-NL63 was detected by multiplex PCR, and HCoV-NL63 viral pneumonia was diagnosed. Hypogammaglobulinemia was studied by determining serum immunoglobulins levels and protein electrophoresis. The treatment consisted of supportive therapy and replacement with intravenous immunoglobulins. After therapy, the patient improved his oxygenation, and the infection was resolved in a few days. Conclusions This case highlights the relevance of other coronaviruses infections besides SARS-CoV-2 in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy who develop secondary antibody deficiency, and the importance of replacement therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins at early stage of infection with HCoV-NL63.

4.
GERMS ; 12(2):253-261, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033512

ABSTRACT

Introduction Prior evidence found that bloodstream infections (BSIs) are common in viral respiratory infections and can lead to heightened morbidity and mortality. We described the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of BSIs in patients with COVID-19. Methods This was a single-center retrospective cohort study of adults consecutively admitted from March to June 2020 for COVID-19 with BSIs. Data were collected by electronic medical record review. BSIs were defined as positive blood cultures (BCs) with a known pathogen in one or more BCs or the same commensal organism in two or more BCs. Results We evaluated 290 patients with BCs done;39 (13.4%) had a positive result. In univariable analysis, male sex, black/African American race, admission from a facility, hemiplegia, altered mental status, and a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index were positively associated with positive BCs, whereas obesity and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were negatively associated. Patients with positive BCs were more likely to have severe COVID-19, be admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), require mechanical ventilation, have septic shock, and higher mortality. In multivariable logistic regression, factors that were independent predictors of positive BCs were male sex (OR=2.8, p=0.030), hypoalbuminemia (OR=3.3, p=0.013), ICU admission (OR=5.3, p<0.001), SBP<100 mmHg (OR=3.7, p=0.021) and having a procedure (OR=10.5, p=0.019). Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray on admission were less likely to have positive BCs (OR=0.3, p=0.007). Conclusions We found that male sex, abnormal chest X-ray, low SBP, and hypoalbuminemia upon hospital admission, admission to ICU, and having a procedure during hospitalization were independent predictors of BSIs in patients with COVID-19.

5.
Acta Medica Iranica ; 60(6):338-344, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033505

ABSTRACT

Dyspnea and decreased O2 saturation are the most common causes of hospitalization in noncritical COVID-19 patients. Breathing exercises and chest physiotherapy are used for managing the patients. These treatments are, however, not well supported by scientific evidence. In a randomized controlled trial, 80 patients were randomly assigned to planned breathing exercises (n=40) and control groups (n=40). The participants in the intervention group were instructed to blow into a balloon five times a day while lying down. Other therapies were similar in both groups. The severity of dyspnea at rest/after activity and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) with/without O2 therapy were compared between the two groups on the first, second, and third days. The study findings showed no statistically significant difference in SpO2 with/without O2 therapy on the first, second, and third days between the two groups. Although the severity of dyspnea showed no significant difference between the two groups, the mean score of dyspnea at rest (2.72±2.25 vs. 1.6±1.21, P=0.007) and after activity (4.53±2.04 vs. 3.52±1.66, P=0.017) improved in the intervention group on the third day. Balloon-blowing exercise improves dyspnea in noncritical Covid-19 patients, but it does not significantly improve oxygenation.

6.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(8):DC33-DC38, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033411

ABSTRACT

Introduction: It is crucial to determine possible factors associated with exacerbation of the disease due to the alarming global spread, morbidity and mortality associated with Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). It is important to determine the co-morbidities associated with this disease which will help in better treatment of patients in time and to make amendments to management policy. Aim: To compare the clinical features, and predisposing factors (socio-demographic factors and co-morbidities) influencing the outcome in COVID-19 infected patients admitted in a tertiary care centre in the first and second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Microbiology, Dr. Shankarrao Chavan Government Medical College, Nanded, Maharashtra, India. The data was collected from the electronic resource which was maintained by the institute Integrated Disease Surveillance Program (IDSP) health record reporting database for the duration of June 2020 to August 2021. This data included patient’s demographic details (age, sex, address, contact number), other details (history of close contacts, international travel) clinical history, different types of symptoms (ICMR patient category), co-morbidities, number of patients requiring ICU admission, type of sample, the outcome in terms of death and discharge, cause of death. The analysis was done for the complete data and then for two separate durations of the first and second wave which were compared later with Chi-square test (Bivariate analysis). Results: A total of 8841 patients were involved and the majority of patients in the study were between the age group of 30-75 years, there was a predominance of males in first and second waves with 6514 (73.7%) and 5795 (58.6%) respectively. The paediatric patients had a mortality rate of 100% (n=7) found in the second wave. Fever (39%) and dyspnea (22%) were found as the commonest presentation in both waves. Gastrointestinal manifestations were observed relatively more in the second wave. The serious patients on ventilator were found to have (>91%) the highest mortality. It appeared that the highest attributable risk to severity and mortality (eight to ten times increased) was due to hypertension, diabetes and other co-morbidities. Pregnancy did not predisposed to be as a risk factor. Conclusion: Prompt management and preventive care are needed for patients with co-morbidities to avoid the exacerbation of COVID-19 as well as drug cross interactions.

7.
Flora ; 27(2):317-323, 2022.
Article in Turkish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033380

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Although there is limited data on the frequency of nosocomial infections in patients followed up in the intensive care unit due to COVID-19, the rate of empirical antibiotic use in these patients is quite high. In our study, it was planned to determine the frequency of nosocomial infections in patients hospitalized in intensive care units due to COVID-19, the pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, and to investigate the characteristics of these infections. Materials and Methods: Our study is a retrospective study in which the records of 590 adult patients hospitalized in the COVID-19 intensive care unit and followed prospectively between April 1, 2020 and December 31, 2021 were examined. Results: In our study, nosocomial infection developed in 7.28% of patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit due to COVID-19, and mortality was 93% in patients who developed nosocomial infections. Of these infections, 67.44% were lower respiratory tract infections, 25.58% were bloodstream infections, and 6.97% were urinary tract infections. While the median number of toatl hospital stay was 20 days, the median time since admission to infection was 12 days. Infections often developed with a single microorganism, and the most frequently isolated microorganisms are A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae. Conclusion: Nosocomial infections that develop in patients followed in the intensive care unit due to COVID-19, are seen in approximately 7% of patients, but are mortal. In this patient group, regular microbiological follow-up and implementation of strict infection control measures especially for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia;It is recommended to review the antibiotics frequently used in the follow-up and treatment of COVID-19 and to be selective in the decision to start empirical antibiotics in order to prevent the development of antimicrobial resistance.

8.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(T7):176-179, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pneumomediastinum is a rare disease associated with barotrauma and uncommonly occurs in viral pneumonia. Although the underlying mechanism of the incidence of pneumomediastinum in COVID-19 patients is not fully understood, barotrauma is the most probable cause. CASE REPORT: We reported a case of a 27-year-old woman with the chief complaint that was shortness of breath and diagnosed with COVID-19 based on reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction examination. On the 6th day after being admitted to the hospital, suddenly, the intensity of dyspnea was increased with the decrease of oxygen saturation. Computerized tomography of the chest confirmed pneumomediastinum and pneumonia COVID-19. There was no improvement of symptoms after oxygen and steroid administration. Emergency thoracotomy was not performed;yet, and the patient has died. CONCLUSIONS: Although pneumomediastinum is benign disease and self-limited disease, the presents of pneumomediastinum may relate to worse outcomes in COVID-19 infections.

9.
Anaesthesia ; 77:19, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032358

ABSTRACT

Sedation is integral to facilitating interventions on the intensive care unit (ICU), which would otherwise be intolerable;however, in excess it may prolong intubation and lead to brain dysfunction such as delirium [1]. This is a frequently under-diagnosed problem in the ICU, shown to result in worsened neurological outcomes [2]. The Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT), Richmond Agitation- Sedation Score (RASS), Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAMICU) are validated to assess for pain, over-sedation and delirium, respectively. We explored how effectively these were used in a hospital in the Northeast of England to address over-sedation and delirium. Methods Adults intubated and ventilated on critical care were identified, and the most recent 24 h of bedside observation charts examined for completion of 4-h RASS, 4-h CPOT and 12-h CAM-ICU assessments. For those over-sedated during this time, we assessed whether sedation was appropriately titrated or held. Patients on neuromuscular blocking agents, with acute brain injury or with specific indication for deep sedation were excluded. Results Fifty-five patient-days were audited, during which sedation was utilised in 71% (n = 39). Overall, pain and RASS were monitored well, assessed at 88% and 91% of 4-h opportunities, respectively;however, CAM-ICU was recorded at only 15% of opportunities. Where documented, RASS scores were within target (-2 to 1) 45% of the time. Where out of range, this was almost exclusively due to oversedation (RASS ≤ -3). Eighty-five per cent (n = 33) of patients were over-sedated on at least one occasion in the last 24 h. Of these, 39% (n = 13) had their sedation neither titrated nor held during this time. Notably, this was the case for 55% (n = 11) of the 20 patients intubated for COVID-19, in contrast to only 15% (n = 2) of the 13 patients intubated for other reasons. Discussion Over-sedation in ICU remains prevalent despite adequate RASS surveillance. This is particularly true among COVID-19 patients. Further, infrequent CAM-ICU use may result in delirium being missed, carrying risk of adverse neurological outcomes and mortality [2]. We have implemented protocolled PAD pathways within each bed space, to empower nurses to titrate sedation and improve awareness of CAM-ICU. Additionally, we have disseminated education on the harms of over-sedation and unrecognised delirium, and we are evaluating re-audit data to ascertain if there has been a resulting improvement in PAD management for sedated patients.

10.
Anaesthesia ; 77:19, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032357

ABSTRACT

Intensive care unit (ICU) admission has significant long-term sequelae, affecting both physical and mental health [1]. Long-term respiratory outcomes in COVID- 19 ICU patients has been of concern and the British Thoracic Society recommends a post-hospital-discharge chest X-ray (CXR) and clinic follow-up [2]. We aimed to establish the long-term health outcomes of patients with COVID-19 following admission to ICU. Methods All patients admitted to ICU at University Hospital Crosshouse with COVID-19 from 01/03/2020-31/08/2021 were identified retrospectively. A comparator prepandemic dataset of patients admitted with pneumonia from 01/07/2018-31/12/ 2019 was also identified. Re-admissions were excluded in both cohorts. Electronic notes were interrogated for demographics, outcomes and follow-up. This included attendance at our post-ICU recovery programme, InS:PIRE. Statistical analysis was by Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results A total of 135 patients were admitted during the COVID-19 period, with 52 patients admitted in the pre-pandemic period. Comparisons between the groups are shown in Table 1. Of the 78 COVID-19 survivors, 48 (61.5%) had a CXR after hospital discharge. In 50%, this was abnormal. Thirty patients (38.5%) had evidence of outpatient respiratory follow-up, with four (13.3%) were now receiving long-term oxygen therapy. Of the 37% who had completed InS:PIRE by the time of data collection, most did not feel back to baseline, with best health scores averaging 66% of normal. Impairment in usual daily activities was the main issue. (Table Presented) Discussion We demonstrate admission to ICU with COVID-19 is associated with prolonged ventilation, high mortality and significant ongoing morbidity among survivors. Chest X-rays remain abnormal in half of patients after hospital discharge and many remain significantly functionally impaired. The low rates of respiratory follow- up is concerning and may mean our study underestimates the problem. Continued follow-up of survivors of severe COVID-19 is, therefore, crucial and will allow us to identify ongoing clinical and rehabilitation needs as well as enable access to appropriate support.

11.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50(9):1411-1415, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032195
12.
ASAIO Journal ; 68:141, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032191

ABSTRACT

Studies have shown that SARS-CoV2 can infect the vagal nerve and its connections to the brain stem. This neuronal involvement is seen mostly in the delayed inflammatory phase. It is associated with autonomic nervous system dysfunction, resulting in decreased respiratory ventilation and impaired blood pressure as well as heart rate regulation. The dysautonomia seen in SARSCoV-2 infection can be measured, and heart rate variability (HRV) measurement is one method. Our study explores the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and mortality in patients with COVID- 19 using HRV measurement. In a prospective design, data of consecutive patients with SARS-CoV-2 positive infection admitted to Banner university of Arizona, Tucson, and whose telemetry information was available was collected between August 2020 to November 2021. We attempted to use the telemetry data to measure diurnal heart rate variation by obtaining mean average hourly heart rates, divided into 12-hour day/night periods. The primary outcome measure was mortality. The secondary outcome measured includes incidence of acute kidney injury, transfer to ICU, need for mechanical ventilation, and live discharge from hospital. 334 patients were included in the study. The baseline demographic characteristics, medical history, radiological data, laboratory data, details of medications, and hospital course were reported. Diseases associated with an autonomic dysfunction like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, a history of alcohol abuse, clinical evidence of autonomic neuropathy, or a recent myocardial infarction, documented constrictive or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, sustained non-sinus dysrhythmias, atrioventricular conduction defects will be excluded in the final analysis. Mortality was high in patients with lower heart rate variability. Compared with survivors, non-survivors were older, were less frequently women, had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, longer stay in the hospital, received an organ transplant, smoking, and higher level of calcitonin. Lower heart rate variability was associated with a higher incidence of acute kidney injury, need for mechanical ventilation, and need for ECMO. This study suggests that analysis of the variability of heart rate may have prognostic implications in patients with COVID19.

13.
ASAIO Journal ; 68:63, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032181

ABSTRACT

Background: In patients with COVID-19 and respiratory failure, class 3 obesity (body mass index > 40 kg/m2) has been associated with worse survival. Obese patients on mechanical ventilation with progressively more severe acute respiratory syndrome (ARDS) may be offered venovenous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy. The impact of morbid obesity on the outcome of COVID-19 patients supported with VV ECMO has been underexplored. Methods: This is a multicenter, retrospective observational cohort analysis of critically ill adults with COVID-19 ARDS requiring advanced mechanical ventilation with or without VV ECMO. Data was collected from 236 international institutions forming the COVID-19 Critical Care Consortium international registry. Patients were admitted between January 2020 to December 2021. Included patients were stratified by ECMO status and a BMI threshold at 40 kg/m2. Median values with interquartile range (IQR) were used to summarize continuous variables and multi-state analysis was used to explore the effect of Class 3 obesity on the study endpoints of patient survival to discharge or death. Results: Complete data was available on 8851 of 9059 patients on mechanical ventilation, of which 767 patients required VV ECMO. For the entire study group, older age and male gender were associated with an increased risk of death. The demographics and comorbidities of the higher BMI (H >40 kg/m2) and lower BMI (L ≤40 kg/m2) cohorts were similar with the exception of age and weight. Patients with a higher BMI were younger. The median age of the H, non-ECMO cohort was 56 years (46-64), and the H, ECMO cohort was 41 years (35-51) versus the L, non-ECMO cohort of 64 years(55-71), and the L, ECMO cohort of 53years (45-60). Patients requiring VV ECMO had higher SOFA scores, experienced longer ICU and hospital lengths of stay, and a longer duration of total mechanical ventilation. Table The median time to intubation was longer in the mechanical ventilation only group (2 versus 0 days). Predictors for requiring ECMO included younger age, higher BMI and male gender. Risk factors for death included advancing age (every 10 years), male gender and increasing BMI (every 5kg/m2). The association between BMI and a higher rate of death was reduced in the mechanical ventilation only group (HR 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 0.99). Conclusion: In patients with severe ARDS due to COVID-19 requiring mechanical ventilation, the likelihood of progressing to VV ECMO therapy or experiencing death is impacted by age, gender and higher BMI. The cohort of COVID-19 patients that ultimately required ECMO appear to be sicker at time hospital admission owing to the shorter time until mechanical ventilation. It appears the association between increasing BMI and death differs among the ECMO and mechanical ventilation alone cohorts. We would advocate for a prospective study to determine the benefit of VVECMO for the obese patient requiring VV-ECMO for COVID-19 ARDS. (Figure Presented).

14.
HemaSphere ; 6:2388-2389, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032150

ABSTRACT

Background: Intensive care unit (ICU) admission during hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is associated with poor prognosis1,2. Published series report a range of ICU admission rates from 24-40% of transplant patients, most frequent reasons involving septic shock, respiratory failure and veno-occlusive disease3. In addition, patients undergoing HSCT are at a high risk of severe morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-194. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze outcome of HSCT patients requiring ICU admission in our center. Methods: We retrospectively analysed outcome of 752 patients who underwent HSCT in our centre from January/2008 to June/2021. Data were collected from patients' clinical histories. Results: 103 (14%) patients required ICU admission (baseline and HSCT characteristics on table). Median time to ICU admission was 42 days (-2-1765). Seven of these patients were admitted to ICU on two occasions giving a total of 110 consecutive ICU admissions available for analysis. Main reason for ICU admission was respiratory distress (74;67%), mainly due to pneumonia (53%) including a 3% caused by COVID19, pulmonary edema (26%) and pulmonary haemorrhage (8%). Septic shock was second most common cause for ICU admission (26;24%) due to gram-negative bacilli (47%), fungal (15%) gram-positive bacteria (13%), virus (10%) and others/idiopathic (16%). Other less frequent causes were veno-occlusive disease (11;10%), hepatic failure/encephalopathy (8;7%), haemorrhagic complications (6;5%), cardiorespiratory arrest (2%), GVHD (2%), cardiogenic shock (2%). Of the 110 ICU admissions, 37 (34%) required hemofiltration, of which 30 (81%) died;and 77 (70%) required orotracheal intubation, of which 59 (77%) died. During the 110 ICU admissions, 67 patients (61%) died in the ICU;of these, 40 (37%) received unrelated donor HSCT, 36 (33%) sibling donor, 16 (15%) haploidentical and 17 (16%) autologous. Median ICU length of stay of these patients was 13 days (range 1-76). The cause of death was the same reason for ICU admission. Eighteen (16%) patients were discharged from ICU and died prior to Hospital discharge and 24 (22%) survived to Hospital discharge and were classified as post-discharge survivors. Of these 24 cases, 19 (79%) remain alive while the others (5;21%) succumbed to underlying disease or complications post-HSCT. Off note, both patients with COVID19 pneumonia (haploidentical and autologous HSCT respectively) were discharged from ICU and remain alive to date, without major complications. Summary/Conclusion: In our study 14% of transplant recipients required ICU admission, slightly lower than previous reports. Most common cause of admission was respiratory failure, consistent with reported. Mortality rate during ICU admission was 61%;higher death rate observed in allogeneic transplantation and those requiring aggressive ICU treatments such as mechanical ventilation or hemofiltration. Although patients with COVID19 pneumoniae who require ICU admission are usually associated with adverse outcome, in our series they responded successfully to intensive treatment. ICU admission following HSCT is associated with poor prognosis, but should not be considered futile. (Table Presented).

15.
HemaSphere ; 6:1038, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032104

ABSTRACT

Background: Vulnerability of patients (pts) with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and their susceptibility to Covid-19 infection is documented in several studies with reported case fatality rates (CFRs) up to 40%, but there is still paucity of data on identifying risk factors of their adverse outcome. Aims: To evaluate demographic, patient-related, CLL-related and Covid-19 related risk factors in hospitalized pts with concurrent CLL and Covid-19. Methods: Total of 81 CLL pts were identified in medical records of three University centers in Belgrade: Clinical Hospital Center (CHC) Zemun, CHC Bezanijska kosa and CHC Zvezdara dedicated to treatment of Covid-19 pts during pandemic (from 15 March 2020 to 31 December 2021). Results: For all 81 pts CFR was 32.1%. Age (median age 68 yrs;range 45-90 yrs) and sex (apparent male prevalence: 61 male and 20 female;M:F=3.05) had no influence on outcome. Pts with Charlson comorbidity index >4 (29/81;35.8%) had significantly higher CFR (38% vs 9.5%, p=0,025). Concerning CLL-directed treatment: 26/81(32.1%) pts were on active treatment (5 pts were on Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 21pts receiving imunochemotherapy), 11/81(13.6%) pts were in remission on previous lines of therapy, while 44/81(54.3%) pts were treatment naive. CLL treatment history had no impact on CFR, as well as anemia (Hb<100g/l) that was present in 29/81(35.8%)pts, hipogammaglobulinemia (21/81;26%pts) and hiperferritinemia>450ng/mL (50/81;61.7%pts). Of evaluated laboratory parameters, high levels of lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH>2xUNL:6/81;7.4%pts), D-dimer (>1000ng/mL:36/81;44.4%pts), and C-reactive protein (CRP>100mg/L: 31/81;38.3%pts) proved to be associated with adverse outcome;p-values 0.002, 0.039 and <0.001, respectively. According to Covid-19 clinical course, the severe Covid-19 score had 35(43,2%)pts, and critical 19(23.5%)pts. Covid-19 infection was treated according to current National guidelines. Corticosteroids were administrated to 81.5% of pts, antiviral agents to 38.3%, IL-6 receptor inhibitor to 11.1%, antiviral monoclonal antibodies to 7.4% and intravenous immunoglobulin to 19.8% of pts. None of listed therapeutic approaches had impact on CFRs. Antibiotics were administrated to 43/81 (53.1%) of pts with documented or highly suspected concomitant bacterial infection (procaltitonin level>0.5ng/mL and/or chest X-Ray image corresponding to bacterial pneumonia), and the bacterial coinfection had adverse impact on CFR (51.2% vs.10.2%;p<0.001). Significantly higher mortality was documented in pts who needed supplemental oxygen (58/81;71%) (CFR 43.1 vs.4.3%;p<0.001), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (25/81-30.9%;19/25 needed mechanical ventilation) (CFR 88% vs.7.1%;p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, bacterial coinfection and ICU admission proved to be the most significant adverse parameters influencing outcome (p=0.012). Summary/Conclusion: Our study proved the dismal outcome of CLL pts with concurrent Covid-19. That could be mainly attributed to the high proportion of bacterial coinfections reflecting their frailty and sucessibility to both viral and bacterial infections.

16.
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031578

ABSTRACT

Mechanical ventilation is a crucial supportive intervention that allows time to facilitate investigations and provide definitive treatment in critically unwell patients. This article focuses on the various modes of respiratory support available, and the mechanical ventilation strategies used in specific disease processes. It also highlights the possible complications associated with mechanical ventilation and the adjuncts that can be used to aid oxygenation.

17.
Journal of Thoracic Oncology ; 17(9):S305-S306, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031523

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2020 the COVID19 pandemic erupted resulting in significant burden on critical care capacity and profound disruption on lung cancer surgery.Despite the reduction in capacity, staff, and resources, we agreed locally to try and maintain full surgical services for lung cancer by adapting the surgical pathway to one less resource intense without compromising patient safety. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of thoracic surgery patients from 16th March 2020 to 1st May 2020 which coincided with the first COVID19 peak (Group A). We compared activity, outcomes, peri-operative course, and histology with a group of patients operated on during the same period in 2019 (Group B). Results: 53 patients in Group A were compared to the 69 patients in Group B.There was no significant different in pulmonary function, mortality, mechanical ventilation, length of inter-costal drain or hospital stay between each group. There was less use of high dependency care in Group A (57% Vs 75%) and more patients in Group A (72%) were part of the Lung Cancer Pathway compared to Group B (59%) (TABLE 1). Malignant histology was confirmed in 64% of Group A compared to 34% of Group B. Two-week post-operative outpatient follow up in Group A, did not identify any patients with symptoms consistent of, or with a confirmation test for COVID19. There were differences in confirmation of malignant histology, tumour size and usage of high dependency care between the groups for patients on the Lung Cancer Pathway (TABLE 2).After 2-year follow up, 85% of Group A and 88% of Group B remain alive. Conclusions: Despite previously unfaced challenges, with careful peri-operative planning we were able to maintain thoracic cancer services and minimise the use of Critical Care resources without increasing complications. During this time tumours were larger in nature and histology was universally malignant. [Formula presented] Keywords: Lung Cancer, Uniportal VATs, COVID19

18.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:1252-1256, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2015, approximately 350,000 adults in the United States experienced nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were treated by the emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Despite recent increases, <40% of adults receive layman-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and <12% apply an automated external defibrillator before EMS personnel. AIM: To know the ability of the Medan city community in handling cardiac arrest for the first time and implementing the 2020 AHA basic life support (BLS). METHODS: This study used a descriptive method with a cross-sectional approach and was conducted in the city of Medan in the period July–October 2021. Sampling used cluster sampling and purposive sampling with inclusion and exclusion criteria. RESULTS: In this study, it was found that the majority of the people of Medan City had less knowledge about CPR in BLS. In this study, only respondents from Medan Marelan District were dominated by good knowledge by 80%. It was found that the people of Medan City have a good level of knowledge about these cardiac events, and the people of Medan City have a low level of knowledge about BLS and CPR. CONCLUSION: The ability of the people of Medan City in implementing BLS and CPR in BLS for cardiac events outside the hospital is still lacking.

19.
Frontiers in Pediatrics ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009893

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) in December 2019 and has since unleashed a global pandemic, with over 518 million cases as of May 10, 2022. Neonates represent a very small proportion of those patients. Among reported cases of neonates with symptomatic COVID-19 infection, the rates of hospitalization remain low. Most reported cases in infants and neonates are community acquired with mild symptoms, most commonly fever, rhinorrhea and cough. Very few require intensive care or invasive support for acute infection. We present a case of a 2-month-old former 26-week gestation infant with a birthweight of 915 grams and diagnoses of mild bronchopulmonary dysplasia and a small ventricular septal defect who developed acute respiratory decompensation due to COVID-19 infection. He required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for 23 days. Complications included liver and renal dysfunction and a head ultrasound notable for lentriculostriate vasculopathy, extra-axial space enlargement and patchy periventricular echogenicity. The patient was successfully decannulated to conventional mechanical ventilation with subsequent extubation to non-invasive respiratory support. He was discharged home at 6 months of age with supplemental oxygen via nasal cannula and gastrostomy tube feedings. He continues to receive outpatient developmental follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a preterm infant during their initial hospitalization to survive ECMO for COVID-19.

20.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 40(16), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009641

ABSTRACT

Background: Prognosis of COVID-19 is poor in the setting of immunosuppression. Casirivimab/imdevimab (REGEN-COV), bamlanivimab, and sotrovimab are investigational monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) authorized for treatment of mild/moderate COVID-19 for patients (pts) 12 years or older and who are at high-risk for progression to severe COVID-19. These neutralizing antibodies, against SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins, have been shown to decrease risk of progression to severe disease. Recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants (allo-SCT) or chimeric antigen T cell therapy (CAR T cell) represent a high risk population. However, treatment outcomes with these MoAbs in these pts are not well described. Methods: This retrospective study included 33 consecutive adult pts who developed mild/moderate COVID-19 and received anti-spike SARS-CoV-2 MoAbs between December 2020 and November 2021. Allo-SCT (N=27) or CAR T cell (N=6) recipients were included, and outcomes were analyzed separately. Pts received REGEN-COV (N=19), bamlanivimab (N=11), or sotrovimab (N=1), missing (N=2). Results: In the allo-SCT cohort (N=27), median age at time of COVID-19 was 55 (23-76) years. Median time from allo-SCT to COVID-19 was 31 (22-64) months. Two pts received CAR T-cell therapy prior to allo-SCT. Diagnoses included leukemia or myeloid diseases (82%), lymphoma (11%), or myeloma (7%). Transplant characteristics are summarized (Table). Thirteen pts were vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 prior to breakthrough COVID-19. Events considered included hospitalization due to COVID- 19, disease progression, or death from any cause. The 6-month event-free and overall survivals were 81% and 91%, respectively. In the CAR T cell recipients cohort (N=6), 4 pts received axicabtagene ciloleucel for diffuse large B-cell or follicular lymphoma and 2 received brexucabtagene autoleucel for mantle cell lymphoma. The median follow-up was 8 (1-11) months. Two pts received autologous SCT prior to COVID-19. Median time from CAR T cell therapy to COVID-19 was 10 (3-24) months. Three pts were vaccinated prior to COVID-19. Only 1 pt was hospitalized due to severe COVID- 19 requiring mechanical ventilation leading to death. Conclusions: These results show a potential benefit of MoAbs in high-risk pts, namely allo-SCT or CAR T cell recipients. Future studies should evaluate the role of prophylactic use MoAbs in these populations. A comparative analysis with a matched control cohort (who did not receive MoAbs) will be provided at the meeting.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL