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1.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 93: 103797, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239546

ABSTRACT

This article analyses the suite of policies and measures enacted by the Indian Union Government in response to the COVID-19 pandemic through apparatuses of disaster management. We focus on the period from the onset of the pandemic in early 2020, until mid-2021. This holistic review adopts a Disaster Risk Management (DRM) Assemblage conceptual approach to make sense of how the COVID-19 disaster was made possible and importantly how it was responded to, managed, exacerbated, and experienced as it continued to emerge. This approach is grounded in literature from critical disaster studies and geography. The analysis also draws on a wide range of other disciplines, ranging from epidemiology to anthropology and political science, as well as grey literature, newspaper reports, and official policy documents. The article is structured into three sections that investigate in turn and at different junctures the role of governmentality and disaster politics; scientific knowledge and expert advice, and socially and spatially differentiated disaster vulnerabilities in shaping the COVID-19 disaster in India. We put forward two main arguments on the basis of the literature reviewed. One is that both the impacts of the virus spread and the lockdown-responses to it affected already marginalised groups disproportionately. The other is that managing the COVID-19 pandemic through disaster management assemblage/apparatuses served to extend centralised executive authority in India. These two processes are demonstrated to be continuations of pre-pandemic trends. We conclude that evidence of a paradigm shift in India's approach to disaster management remains thin on the ground.

2.
RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences ; 8(8):245-262, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2253339

ABSTRACT

Pandemics do not exist in isolation and COVID-19 is no exception. We argue that existing health crises, notably substance use disorder (SUD), developed syndemic relationships with COVID-19 that produced compounding deleterious effects. Combining Merrill Singer's theory of syndemics and assemblage theory, we analyze the combinatory impact of overdose and COVID-19 within a localized context. We focus on Sandusky, Ohio, where we combine police reports, in-depth interviews with area residents, and ethnographic data to compare conditions before and after the emergence of COVID-19. We find dramatic shifts in relevant local contexts due to COVID-19, inhibiting existing systems of law and public policy aimed at overdose prevention and SUD treatment. Further, our findings provide evidence of complications in the COVID-19 response originating from the overdose epidemic.

3.
Rsf-the Russell Sage Journal of the Social Sciences ; 8(8):245-262, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2217535

ABSTRACT

Pandemics do not exist in isolation and COVID-19 is no exception. We argue that existing health crises, notably substance use disorder (SUD), developed syndemic relationships with COVID-19 that produced compounding deleterious effects. Combining Merrill Singer's theory of syndemics and assemblage theory, we analyze the combinatory impact of overdose and COVID-19 within a localized context. We focus on Sandusky, Ohio, where we combine police reports, in-depth interviews with area residents, and ethnographic data to compare conditions before and after the emergence of COVID-19. We find dramatic shifts in relevant local contexts due to COVID-19, inhibiting existing systems of law and public policy aimed at overdose prevention and SUD treatment. Further, our findings provide evidence of complications in the COVID-19 response originating from the overdose epidemic.

4.
Learning, Media & Technology ; : 1-15, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2062742

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the move to remote education exposed old and new inequities, yet it also represented anopportunity to rethink inclusive education. This paper presents findings from a one-year project DIGITAL in a time of Coronavirus anddraws upon policy analysis and interviews with teachers, principals, and community leaders from six countries in the Global North andSouth (Italy, England, Malaysia, Australia, United States and Chile). By mobilising education assemblage theory to challenge binarydivisions (included/excluded, modern/colonial, local/global), it presents five concepts to rethink inclusion and its relationship withtechnologies. It illustrates how during the pandemic alternative entanglements of digital and non-digital technologies challengednarrow and Eurocentric constructions of the digital divide enabling inclusive subjective experiences. Drawing upon local possibilitiesand histories, re-habilitating non-scientific knowledges, especially in view of future experiences of blended education, the paper seeksto provide policy tools to rethink current understandings of inclusive education. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Learning, Media & Technology is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
ArchNet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research ; 16(1):172-183, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1684964

ABSTRACT

PurposeOver the coming decades, the widespread application of social distancing creates challenges for the urban planning and design profession. This article aims to address the phenomenon of boredom in public places, its main influences that generate change in repetition, monotony and everyday lifestyle, whether positive, negative or both – depending on the binding and governing rules of urban shape variations and daily lifestyles.Design/methodology/approachThis viewpoint relied on literary narration to discuss the phenomenon of boredom vis-à-vis urban design and placemaking solutions in the face of social distancing. It builds its orientation by analyzing the works of nine scholars and five of their relevant theories.FindingsEvidence from previous studies helped develop three-pillar guidelines that can produce better results for post-pandemic development in the face of boredom. These pillars include recommendations for the trinity of heterogeneity for metamorphosis in urban form, changes in public life and digital transformation in a time of uncertainty on how to confront (un)seen boredom in public spaces. Practitioners should develop new insights into the relationship between people and place by reviewing existing paradigms in urban studies to avoid repetition, monotony and change in everyday life after a pandemic.Originality/valueThe added value here is in underlining boredom as one of the consequences of social distancing and lockdown applications building on the phenomenon's theorizers. The key contribution of this work is the three-pillar recommendation for confronting the boredom in public spaces that happens because of social distancing and lockdown.

6.
Res Publica-Revista De Filosofia Politica ; 24(3):467-480, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1614175

ABSTRACT

Historically, disaster studies have been confronted with two antagonistic, but not exclusive, conceptualizations of catastrophes: first and foremost, extreme singularities that produce history, but also processes that perpetuate sociopolitical structures and inequalities. By exploring how the 1970 earthquake in Ancash, Peru was the scenario for implementing discourses of acceleration and deceleration amid strong transformations in Peruvian society, this article presents an alternative understanding of disasters beyond disruption and continuity by focusing on the temporal articulations they induce. When conceived as temporal devices, disasters have the capacity of restructuring rhythms, scales, and temporalities heterogeneously and manifoldly. This paper aims to bring forward arguments that, although grounded in the 1970 Ancash earthquake, can be applied to other discussions of disasters, catastrophes, and crises as triggering scenarios of economic, social, or cultural acceleration and deceleration.

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