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1.
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol ; : 306624X221124834, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053528

ABSTRACT

Previous research on workplace victimization has often disregarded forensic psychiatric populations and not yet been extended to the coronavirus pandemic. The present study expected the isolation of the government-issued lockdown to increase aggressive behavior in forensic patients, ultimately decreasing the general well-being of victimized forensic workers. Possible buffering protective factors (resilience and active coping) and enhancing risk factors (avoidant coping and passive coping) were investigated with the intention of optimizing the general well-being of at-risk forensic workers. The valid sample (N = 311) consisted of Dutch and Belgian forensic workers (74.6% females) with at least 9 hours of weekly patient contact, and with a mean age of 37.99 (SD = 12.20). Participants reported the number of violent incidents in the past 2 months, as well as completed a questionnaire battery including measures of well-being, resilience, and coping strategies. A significant increase of victimization during the lockdown compared to after it was lifted was found, however, the study did not find evidence to support that this negatively influenced the worker's general well-being. Active coping was found to be a significant moderator and protective factor for the general well-being of victimized forensic workers. In contrast, resilience, avoidant and passive coping were not significant moderators in this association. The present study has valuable clinical implications that could lead to preparatory and preventative measures for forensic workers at risk of being victimized. Future research may investigate constructs such as life satisfaction and post-traumatic growth, as well as be broadened into prison populations.

2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2006035

ABSTRACT

Despite known links between men's avoidant coping behaviours (e.g., distraction, denial, substance use) and suicide risk, little research has explored the mechanisms underpinning this relationship. This study sought to examine whether male-type depression symptoms (e.g., anger, aggression, emotion suppression), assessed by the Male Depression Risk Scale, mediate the association between avoidant coping and suicide/self-harm ideation in men. Data were drawn from an online survey of a community sample of 606 Australian men (M age = 50.11 years; SD = 15.00), conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mediation analyses were applied to examine the effect of male-type depression on the association between avoidant coping and suicidal/self-harm ideation, controlling for age, resilience and the experience of two psychosocial stressors during the COVID-19 pandemic (financial stress and government restrictions). Avoidant coping was associated with suicidal/self-harm ideation, r = 0.45, p < 0.001. Results supported a mediating role of male-type depression symptoms in this relationship, R2= 0.29, PM = 0.36, p < 0.001, underscoring the importance of screening for male-type depression symptoms to better identify men at risk of suicidal/self-harm ideation. Results also suggest a need to support men to develop effective coping strategies, particularly in the context of common psychosocial stressors experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Adaptation, Psychological , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors
3.
Psychosomatic Medicine ; 84(5):A61, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003467

ABSTRACT

It is well established that exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) can have a profound negative impact on physical and mental health and other health-related processes (e.g. decision making;Chang et al. 2019). Research has also indicated that individual differences in coping styles represent one pathway through which exposure to ACEs can confer risk for negative health outcomes (Sheffler et al. 2019). It is less clear however, whether the negative effects of exposure to ACEs extend also to one's self-efficacy for preventing and overcoming COVID-19. The current study aimed to examine the relationship between ACEs, measured as the total number of adverse childhood experiences endorsed on the Adverse Childhood Experiences Scale, and self-efficacy for preventing and overcoming COVID-19, measured using a modified version of the Self-Efficacy for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. In addition, we examined whether the use of avoidant coping strategies (denial, venting, and behavioral disengagement) derived from a principal components analysis of the Brief Coping Questionnaire, statistically mediated the association between ACE scores and COVID-19 self-efficacy. Young adults (N = 86, Mage = 23.6;69% female;34% Asian, 33% white, 23% Latinx, 8% Mixed Race, 2% Black or African American) completed measures as part of a larger study. A series of linear regression analyses indicated that both exposure to a greater number of ACEs (β = -.23, p = .033) and greater use of avoidant coping strategies (β = -.36, p < .001) were associated with lower COVID-19 self-efficacy. On the other hand, ACE scores did not significantly predict the use of avoidant coping strategies (β = .09, p = .41) and when entered into a model simultaneously, both ACEs (β = -.20, p = .049) and coping (β = -.34, p = .001) remained significant predictors of COVID-19 self-efficacy. These results indicate that ACE scores and the use of avoidant coping strategies independently affect COVID-19 self-efficacy, and confirm that the negative health effects of ACEs extend also to perceptions of ability to prevent and overcome COVID-19.

4.
Sleep ; 45(SUPPL 1):A21-A22, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1927380

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic safety restrictions led to changes in social interactions and information seeking about the virus. For some, these led to increased negative emotions, feelings of social isolation, and increased COVID-related media consumption. We examined the relationship of these variables to subjective sleep quality from participant daily diaries kept early in the pandemic. Methods: From April 20th-May 12th, 2020, college (students, faculty/ staff, alumni, parents) and local (churches, community centers, libraries) community members (N=94, 72 women, ages 18-77) completed a 30-minute survey for before and during social distancing (measuring: mental health, personality, social distancing, and demographics) for possible prizes. Participants then completed daily evening and morning diaries for 5-14 days describing daily affect, social isolation, emotion regulation, COVID media consumption, and subjective sleep quality. Results: Emotions: During the pandemic, poor sleep quality was predicted by less positive mood (r(91)=.486, p<.001) and more negative mood (r(91)=-.433, p<.001). Participants with poorer sleep quality reported less success regulating their emotions that day (r(90)=.292, p=.005) and greater suppression of emotions (rather than cognitive reappraisals to regulate them) (r(91)=-.260, p=.012). Social Isolation: Subjective sleep quality was not predicted by social distancing behaviors (r(88)=.069, p>.05);however, poorer sleep quality was significantly predicted by greater daily feelings of social isolation (r(91)=-.264, p=.005) and lower feelings of social life satisfaction (r(91)=.338, p<.001). COVID-related media: Sleep quality was not significantly related to COVID-media consumption for all participants;however, moderation analyses showed that participants with low avoidance coping, low neuroticism, and high emotional well-being did experience poorer sleep quality associated with greater COVID media consumption (all p's<.05). Conclusion: That mood and social isolation are associated with sleep quality replicates previous findings. The pandemic, however, provided a unique opportunity to observe these relationships in individuals not normally socially isolated because of confounding variables (e.g., health issues, depression, anxiety) with known relationships to sleep quality. That COVID-related media was only related to sleep quality for more well-adjusted participants (low avoidance coping, low neuroticism, high emotional well-being) was surprising, suggesting some may find COVID-19 information anxiety-relieving rather than anxiety-provoking.

5.
Index de Enfermeria ; 31(2), 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925119

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the psychological impact and coping strategies in Peruvian adults during the Covid-19 pandemic. Methods: A qualitative study was developed with 6 males and 4 women, compiled through a semi-structured interview guide. Results: The most stressful situations for peruvian adults were their health vulnerability, the limitation of their freedoms, labor and economic changes, and family conflicts. The psychological impact on them was expressed through emotional distress, physiological, somatic and cognitive changes. And, they used selfcare, compliance with health measures, relaxation, relaxation and entertainment as coping strategies, as well as the reassessment of the situation. Conclusions: The pandemic and compulsory social confinement caused a psychological impact on peruvian adults and they have used active and avoidant coping strategies functional to the context.

6.
Diabetic Medicine ; 39(SUPPL 1):121-122, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1868631

ABSTRACT

Objective: The effects of the covid-19 pandemic on mental health have been profound. There is a complex bi-directional relationship between mental health and diabetes self-care. We examined whether covid-19 anxiety syndrome, depression and health anxiety predicted domains of diabetes self-management and investigated whether greater covid-19 anxiety syndrome would independently contribute to poorer diabetes self-care. Methods: We sent surveys to patients attending a London hospital diabetes clinic. Participants (n = 369, mean age 50.5 years, 52.9% female) completed the diabetes self-management questionnaire (DSMQ), the covid-19 anxiety syndrome scale (C-19ASS), which measures perseveration and avoidant maladaptive coping behaviour, assessed with measures of co-existent depression and health anxiety, controlling for age, gender, and social deprivation. Clinical data including pre-and post-lockdown HbA1c measures were obtained from hospital records. Results: Depression scores were much higher than pre-pandemic reports, although the prevalence of covid-19 anxiety syndrome was not higher than measured elsewhere. Both pre-existing health anxiety and depression independently predicted poorer measures of diabetes care, as did lower socioeconomic rank. However, avoidant covid-19 anxiety responses were independently associated with higher diabetes self-care scores. HbA1c levels improved significantly over the UK lockdown in our cohort (p < 0.001). Conclusion: During the height of lockdown our research suggests that avoidant coping behaviours characteristic of the covid-19 anxiety syndrome could work to improve diabetes self-care, at least in the short term. We recommend screening for depression, and we should be aware of the significant minority of patients with covid-19 anxiety syndrome who may now find it difficult to re-engage with face-to- face clinic opportunities.

7.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816908

ABSTRACT

Background and Purpose: Until a vaccine is widely available, adherence to COVID-19 preventive behaviors is the most effective way to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. While there is a general paucity of information on COVID-19 infection and its impact on cancer patients, immunocompromised individuals, such as cancer patients, are likely at greater risk for both COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. In addition, a cancer diagnosis can cause stress, anxiety, depression, psychological distress, and poor quality of life. While the recommendations for COVID-19 parallel the common recommendations for managing infection risk, the enhanced social isolation and limited social distancing can be even more difficult for patients resulting in increased risk for psychological distress and deteriorations in health outcomes. Depressive disorders frequently result in substantial functional impairment, as well as increased emotional, economic, and productivity costs. It is important to understand how the COVID-19 pandemic impacts psychological and psychosocial factors, as well as health behaviors of cancer patients and survivors, and how various contextual factors may play risk and protective roles. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to determine differences in stress, mental health and coping behaviors, and adherence to COVID-19 preventive behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic among three groups of adults (in active cancer treatment, cancer survivors, and those without a history of cancer). This study focuses on determining how sociodemographic characteristics and cancer status influence COVID-19 mental health/coping mechanisms, as well as how mental health/coping mechanisms and cancer status may predict adherence to preventive COVID-19 behaviors. Methods: Panel survey firm Qualtrics was used to administer an online survey among 897 U.S. adults in May of 2020. Quota sampling was utilized to ensure a sample consisting of approximately one-third: cancer patients currently in treatment (32.0%, n = 287), cancer survivors not currently in treatment (33.6%, n=301), and respondents with no cancer history (34.4%, n = 309). Survey items assessed demographic variables, depression, coping, and adherence to COVID-19 preventive behaviors. Results and Discussion: Preliminary analyses show that cancer patients report higher levels of depressive symptoms than survivors and the control group. In addition, cancer patients in active treatment use both avoidance and approach-focused coping more frequently than both survivors and the control group. Regression analyses show that avoidance coping predicts lower adherence to COVID-19 preventive behaviors, while approach-focused coping predicts higher adherence. Analyses are ongoing.

8.
Int J Ment Health Addict ; : 1-13, 2021 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351335

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of psychological distress, associated lifestyle behaviors, and associated coping strategies among the students of healthcare profession. A total of 588 medical, dental, and nursing students studying in institutes of health sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, India participated in this cross-sectional online survey during September-October, 2020. A semi-structured questionnaire, DASS-21questionnaire, and Brief COPE were used to collect relevant information. The proportion of students experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress was 26.2%, 27.7%, and 9.7%, respectively. Body mass index, presence of comorbidity, and soft drink consumption were significantly associated with psychological distress. Students experiencing psychological distress were applying emotion-focused coping behaviors (venting, acceptance, self-blame, substance use, religion) and avoidant coping behaviors (self-distraction, behavioral disengagement, denial). The prevalence of psychological distress among the students of health profession studying in KIIT University of Bhubaneswar during the period of Covid-19 pandemic is low and it can be further lowered by designing appropriate interventions incorporating healthy lifestyle behaviors and suitable coping strategies thereby ensuring sound mental health of these students.

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