Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 103
Filter
1.
Mediterranean Marine Science ; 24(1):50-55, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2242019

ABSTRACT

Seabirds are increasingly recognized as important bio-indicators of marine ecosystems that are useful in assessing environ-mental disturbance on the marine biota. Over the period 2020-22 and during the first national systematic recording of the sea wa-ters surrounding the Republic of Cyprus, we recorded the spatio-temporal presence, abundance and behaviour of seabirds using the ESAS (European Seabirds At Sea) methodology. Here we present the observation of an accidentally entangled pelagic seabird in COVID-19 material which to the best of our knowledge is the first incident in the Mediterranean Basin. The systematic recording of entangled marine birds in personal protective equipment (PPE) used to prevent COVID-19 transmission worldwide seems to be of crucial importance for one of the most important emerging threats for the conservation of seabirds at global scale.

2.
Sci Total Environ ; 872: 162122, 2023 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240270

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 lockdown reduced drastically human presence outdoors, providing an uncontrolled experiment for disentangling direct and indirect effects of human presence on animal fearfulness. We measured 18,494 flight initiation distances (FIDs, the distance at which individual animals fly away when approached by a human) from 1333 populations of 202 bird species taken in four European cities both before, during and after the lockdown. FIDs decreased during lockdown in rural habitats but increased in urban habitats, especially for singing birds. Height above ground increases during lockdown in non-singing birds only, and birds adjusted horizontal tolerance to approach according to height outside lockdown, in rural habitats and while not singing. Responses showed lagged effects after lockdown in urban but not in rural habitats. Differential responses to lockdown among habitats and between signing and non-singing birds were consistent with relaxation of direct disturbance effects on birds in rural habitats during lockdown, as well as with increased indirect fear effects mediated by predator release in cities. FIDs seemed to measure the balance of direct and indirect effects of humans on predations risk and food needs rather than direct effects of humans on fear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Predatory Behavior , Animals , Humans , Predatory Behavior/physiology , Communicable Disease Control , Fear/physiology , Birds/physiology , Ecosystem
3.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 2022 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232808

ABSTRACT

Co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 and influenza viruses has been reported worldwide in humans. Wild birds are natural reservoir hosts for coronaviruses (CoVs) and avian influenza viruses (AIVs). It is unknown whether co-infection with these two types of viruses occurs in wild birds. In this study, the prevalence of co-infection with CoV and AIV in wild birds in Shanghai, China during 2020-2021 was investigated by detecting these viruses in cloacal, tracheal, and faecal samples. Results showed that the overall rate of samples positive for both CoV and AIV was 3.3% (82/2510; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.6%-4.0%), and that was mainly from Anseriformes. In CoV-positive samples, 38.9% (82/211; 95% CI: 32.5%-45.6%) of them had both CoVs and AIVs, whereas only 26.9% (82/305; 95% CI: 22.2%-32.1%) of AIV-positive samples had both CoVs and AIVs. These results suggest that CoV infection in wild birds renders them more susceptible to AIV infection. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene sequences of CoVs revealed that gamma-CoVs mainly cluster with duck CoVs and that delta-CoVs are more diversified and cluster with those of various wild birds. Continual surveillance is necessity to monitor the transmission and evolution of co-infection of these two types of viruses in their natural hosts.

4.
Biodiversitas Journal of Biological Diversity ; 22(4), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835949

ABSTRACT

Winarni NL, Anugra BG, Anisafitri S, Kaunain NN, Pradana DH. 2021. Fieldwork during pandemic: Backyard bird survey and making student’s biological field practice works. Biodiversitas 22: 1887-1894. The COVID-19 pandemic situations had forced universities to shutdown face-to-face lectures and change it to online teaching. This change had brought significant challenges to biological courses which need field practice in their syllabus and therefore field practice should be adjusted and innovative. During November-December 2020, we compared students' field practice from the Ornithology class to urban bird survey to evaluate whether the data collected by students can contribute to citizen science as well as to enhance field practice during online courses. We used point count methods to survey bird communities in urban environment in Jakarta and its satellite cities. We found that the students tended to observe the most abundant birds such as the cave swiftlet and Eurasian tree sparrow and missed unfamiliar species which were smaller-sized birds that use aerial and upper canopy. It was suggested that the data from field practice can also support citizen science when prioritized to common, abundance species. In addition, best practices for field practice were provided, emphasizing the independent field practice incorporating technology in which the results were communicated to the students. Hence, strengthening field practice for biological courses is important to support biodiversity conservation research and activities.

5.
Animal Conservation ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2192225
6.
2022 International Conference on Electrical and Information Technology, IEIT 2022 ; : 132-139, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2191934
7.
Journal of Child Psychotherapy ; 48(3):351-361, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2186731
8.
9th International Conference on Future Data and Security Engineering, FDSE 2022 ; 1688 CCIS:462-476, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2173960
9.
1st International Conference on Climate Chance and Environmental Sustainability, 2021 ; : 173-184, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2173609
10.
Heliyon ; 8(11): e11324, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2179010

ABSTRACT

Wild birds are natural reservoirs of many emerging viruses, including some zoonoses. Considering that the territory of Kazakhstan is crossed by several bird migration routes, it is important to know pathogenic viruses circulating in migratory birds in this region. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the host range, diversity and spatial distribution of avian paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, and astroviruses in free-ranging wild birds in the southeastern region of Kazakhstan. For this purpose, we collected tracheal and cloacal swabs from 242 wild birds belonging to 51 species and screened them using conventional PCR assays. Overall, 4.1% (10/242) and 2.9% (7/242) of all examined birds tested positive for coronaviruses and astroviruses, respectively. Coronaviruses were found in the orders Pelecaniformes (30%; 3/10), Charadriiformes (30%; 3/10), Columbiformes (20%; 2/10), Anseriformes (10%; 1/10), and Passeriformes (10%; 1/10). All detected strains belonged to the genus Gammacoronavirus. Astroviruses were detected in birds representing the orders Passeriformes (57%; 4/7), Coraciiformes (14%; 1/7), Charadriiformes (14%; 1/7), and Columbiformes (14%; 1/7). Paramyxoviruses were observed in only two birds (0.8%; 2/242). Both strains were closely related to the species APMV-22, which had not been previously detected in Kazakhstan. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial RdRp gene sequences of the virus strains revealed three different clades of astroviruses, two clades of coronaviruses, and one clade of paramyxoviruses. The results of this study provide valuable information on the diversity and spatial distribution of paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, and astroviruses in wild birds in southeastern Kazakhstan and highlight the importance of further thorough monitoring of wild birds in this region.

11.
African Farming and Food Processing ; : 12-13, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2124383
12.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(10):442-450, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2123952
13.
Tecnologia En Marcha ; 35:25-30, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2121128
14.
Annals of Biology ; 38(2):322-327, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2112182
15.
International Hatchery Practice ; 35(4):27-28, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2045268
16.
Infect Genet Evol ; 104: 105356, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036365

ABSTRACT

An H3N1 avian influenza virus was detected in a laying hens farm in May 2019 which had experienced 25% mortality in Northern France. The complete sequencing of this virus showed that all segment sequences belonged to the Eurasian lineage and were phylogenetically very close to many of the Belgian H3N1 viruses detected in 2019. The French virus presented two genetic particularities with NA and NS deletions that could be related to virus adaptation from wild to domestic birds and could increase virulence, respectively. Molecular data of H3N1 viruses suggest that these two deletions occurred at two different times.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus , Influenza in Birds , Animals , Chickens , Female , Influenza A virus/genetics , Phylogeny
17.
Chinese Journal of Nosocomiology ; 32(12):1880-1884, 2022.
Article in English, Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034518
18.
Zycie Weterynaryjne ; 96(1):42-49, 2021.
Article in Polish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034018
19.
Economic Affairs ; 67(2):37-42, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2026767
20.
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine ; 20(1):17-24, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2026591
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL