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1.
Supportive Care in Cancer ; 30:S24, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935801

ABSTRACT

Introduction To investigate immediate and longer-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer care in Australia and to provide context for consideration of system-level and oncology workforce challenges, we examined provision of a range of cancer services during 2020. Methods As a marker of cancer control activity, we examined sentinel diagnostic and therapeutic procedures relating to 14 cancer types using claims data for the Medicare Benefits Schedule, a listing of medical services subsidised by the Australian Government. Results Impacts of COVID-19 on cancer-related services were observed early in the pandemic with observed number of quarterly services notably lower than expected for most cancer types nationally. Some recovery of services through to March 2021 followed with modest increases in quarterly services above that expected for some cancer types. However, sustained impacts overall for 2020 were observed for many services with 8% (163,595) fewer diagnostic and 9% (14,600) fewer therapeutic procedures observed nationally in 2020 than were expected from historical data.1 Conclusions Recovery of service numbers may indicate workload increases for an already over-burdened oncology workforce and may contribute to physical and psychological fatigue in service providers.2 Potential implications of sustained impact on services include later stage at diagnosis, increased treatment complexity and poorer outcomes. Understanding of ongoing impacts on care delivery can inform cancer control planning beyond the pandemic.

2.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816913

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 presents a unique threat to patients with lung cancer, with mortality rates as high as ∼32%. Given the convergence of these two deadly diseases, the lung cancer research and advocacy communities rapidly mobilized in early 2020 to create the COVID Lung Cancer Consortium (CLCC), a global assembly of leading experts in thoracic oncology, immunology, virology, vaccines and patient advocacy. With ongoing robust exchange of data and shared learning and rational planning for clinical and laboratory investigations, the CLCC is bringing its collective expertise to bear on beginning to address the question of why patients with lung cancer are at such elevated risk of worse outcomes from COVID-19. These efforts led to a recently funded U54 CA260560 grant as part of the National Cancer Institute's SeroNet initiative to study the magnitude, quality and duration of antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with lung cancer compared to healthy controls. In the first project, our Mt. Sinai U54 Serological Center of Excellence will follow a prospective lung cancer cohort (750 patients) and a matched non-lung cancer control group (750 individuals) to determine if there are differences in antibody responses related to age, gender, tobacco history, and race/ethnicity. Given that effective SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are now being deployed, the study will also analyze antibody responses to vaccination across these two patient cohorts. The second project will examine biological determinants correlating with susceptibility to infection, including analysis of both ACE2 and TMPRSS2 levels, and antibody-mediated neutralization in pre-clinical models of established lung cancer and normal lung epithelial cell lines. In order to capture a diverse and inclusive patient population, this effort will be supported by GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer through its national network of Centers of Excellence. This rapid global mobilization of the lung cancer community through the CLCC and the resulting Serological Center of Excellence is positioned to answer fundamental questions regarding the susceptibility of patients with lung cancer to SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe COVID-19 disease and provide information to allow assessment of the value of vaccination and the utility of specifically designed vaccine programs for this high-risk patient population.

3.
IAEA Bulletin ; 63(1):20-21, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1717225
4.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention ; 31(1 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1677445

ABSTRACT

Background: Comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans are region-specific blueprints that identify cancer priorities and health equity informed strategies to address cancer burden and are supported by the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Although CCC plans are created by stakeholder coalitions, few have focused on community engaged approaches, which may diminish their applicability for community members. Thus, in preparation for its forthcoming 2022-2027 CCC plan, the Illinois Comprehensive Cancer Control Program collaborated with the University of Illinois Cancer Center's Community Engagement and Health Equity office to implement a community engagement strategy to address cancer burden. Objective: To describe the development and implementation of a community engagement strategy for the 2022-2027 Illinois CCC plan. Method: The goal of the community engagement strategy was to identify barriers, facilitating factors and recommendations related to cancer burden and equity in Illinois by engaging diverse community stakeholders. A statewide town hall and focus groups (FGs) were implemented in early 2021. Thedevelopment and analysis of the community engagement strategy were guided by the Model for Analysis of Population Health and Health Disparities, CDC's CHANGE Action Guide, and the Community ToolBox. Semistructured guides included questions about fundamental causes of health, social and physical contexts, individual demographics and risk factors, and biologic responses and pathways. The town hall was open to Illinoisians over 18 years of age. FG participants were selected using purposive sampling to maximize group heterogeneity. Eight FGs were held, one each for: rural residents, survivors, young survivors, caregivers, and Spanish speakers, and three that were a mix of community members. Town hall notes and FGs were analyzed using content analysis. Results were synthesized and a final report was included in the forthcoming plan. Results: Town hall and FG (n=8) participants (n=115) included cancer survivors (36%), caregivers (27%), Latinos (17%), African Americans (23%), and rural residents (14%). Throughout the development of the plan, data were continuously reviewed with the coalition developing the CCC Plan. The final report described multi-level factors that contribute to cancer disparities among Illinoisians, proposed recommendations to improve health across the cancer continuum across multiple levels, funding priorities, and the impact of COVID-19 on cancer care. Participant quotes supported strategies throughout the plan. Conclusion: A robust community engagement strategy for the forthcoming 2022-2027 Illinois CCC Plan was implemented through a successful academic-state public health department partnership. This strategy ensures that the plan reflects the expertise and voices of Illinoisians impacted by cancer. This engagement strategy, framed around health determinants that impact cancer risk and outcomes, may be replicated by other coalitions creating CCC plans.

5.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 16: 1341, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636630

ABSTRACT

Cancer prevention and control services worldwide must actively rebuild and contribute to improved health systems resilience alongside and beyond the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus disease) pandemic, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Cancer advocacy groups should respond to this unprecedented challenge as an opportunity to bolster community and patient involvement in research and clinical practice that is adjusted to local needs and circumstances. This short communication provides a synthesis of these critical challenges and, stemming from the pioneering activities of Gordon McVie on patient empowerment, urges policy makers and researchers to develop new implementation strategies that start from the social, economic and health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic to overcome roadblocks in the access to cancer care. We propose that developing the domain of collaborative implementation research in national cancer control plans will be the key to consolidate patient-centred services with both an equity lens and a focus on integration of new technologies as all countries drive towards the 2030 goals of universal health coverage.

6.
Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 17(SUPPL 9):71, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1598888

ABSTRACT

Australia collects a wealth of high-quality information about its health care services, but the potential for this data to improve the health and wellbeing of its citizens is yet to be fully realised. We are now at a turning point, with numerous developments that collectively have the potential to reform the landscape of Australian public data sharing and use for research. This presentation will preview these activities and some of the public benefit use cases for data sharing, including value-adding with researcher-initiated cohort and other studies. Researcher access and use of linked health data can inform health practice and policy across the cancer control continuum, from cancer prevention to early diagnosis and guideline-based acute, survivorship and end-of-life care. It is also a vital tool for identifying inequities in cancer control for population subgroups. We need continuing advocacy and ambition if we are to capitalise on the chaos created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Australia has fallen short internationally with respect to accessible, contemporary, whole-of-population and whole-of-health, national linked data to inform our public health responses including the care of people at risk of and living with cancer. We all have a role in advocating for streamlined researcher access and use of national health datasets of national significance.

7.
Clinical Trials ; 18(SUPPL 5):80-81, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582552

ABSTRACT

SWOG Cancer Research Network, part of the National Cancer Institute's National Clinical Trials Network and the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program, designs and conducts clinical trials to improve the lives of people with cancer. Trial designs are Phase 2, 2/3 and 3 as well as observational cohorts and focus on cancer treatment or on supportive care, symptom management, cancer care delivery, or cancer control. Approximately 4000 patients are put on SWOG trials annually by study sites across all 50 states as well as by international sites;currently, there are 90 active trials. The COVID-19 pandemic forced SWOG to pivot to address the large range of issues facing the study sites that put patients on its trials, as well as required the group to track the impact of the pandemic on its trials. Information was flowing from a variety of sources and we needed to quickly respond, as well as efficiently distribute the information to study sites, who themselves were burdened with pandemic-related staffing and process issues. National Cancer Institute guidance to sites addressed concerns regarding patient safety and minimizing patient risk. Procedures for obtaining informed consent remotely, the distribution of study drug, and the use of telehealth visits were among the issues addressed. SWOG provided protocol-specific guidance regarding timing of specified activities including allowable registration windows, timing of labs, and collection of specimens and patient-reported outcomes. SWOG created new reports to monitor accrual, developed, and deployed a form to collect National Cancer Institutemandated COVID-specific data, provided study sites with information on the specimen repositories ability to receive and process biological trial samples, as well as a prioritized, study-specific list of specimen requirements. Other changes included a switch to remote Quality Assurance audits and adjustments to how sites were monitored regarding submission of data and specimens. New internal data management processes for the remote work environment were implemented. Because of the volume of information, SWOG rapidly launched a clearinghouse on SWOG's website (swog.org) to centrally compile real-time COVID-19 resources, news, and information, including the general guidance documents from SWOG, the National Cancer Institute, its Central institutional review board, and the Food and Drug Administration. Protocol-specific memoranda were issued for 22 SWOG trials. The semi-annual SWOG Group Meeting scheduled for April 2020 was switched to a remote meeting as were the subsequent two meetings and other trainings and seminars. Even with all the changes, 14 new trials were activated in 2020 and 107 journal articles published. Accrual was impacted differentially by disease area, study phase, and trial type. SWOG staff across multiple offices worked together to modify and adjust processes so that site staff could continue to offer the highest quality clinical trials and care for cancer patients amid a public health emergency. In our presentation, we will discuss lessons learned and the impact of the pandemic on the future of clinical trials.

8.
Curr Oncol ; 28(2): 1020-1033, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122033

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Preventive measures taken in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have adversely affected an entire range of cancer-related medical activities. The reallocation of medical resources, staff, and ambulatory services, as well as critical shortages in pharmaceutical and medical supplies have compelled healthcare professionals to prioritize patients with cancer to treatment and screening services based on a set of classification criteria in cancer-related guidelines. Cancer patients themselves have been affected on multiple levels, and addressing their concerns poses another challenge to the oncology community. (2) Methods: We conducted a Canada-wide search of cancer-related clinical practice guidelines on the management and prioritization of individuals into treatment and screening services. We also outlined the resources provided by Canadian cancer charities and patient advocacy groups to provide cancer patients, or potential cancer patients, with useful information and valuable support resources. (3) Results: The identified provincial guidelines emphasized cancer care (i.e., treatment) more than cancer control (i.e., screening). For cancer-related resources, a clear significance was placed on knowledge & awareness and supportive resources, mainly relating to mental health. (4) Conclusion: We provided a guidance document outlining cancer-related guidelines and resources that are available to healthcare providers and patients across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Resources , Neoplasms/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Canada , Humans
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 140, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-946290

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its public health control measures have led to worldwide interruptions in healthcare service delivery, and cancer services are no exception. These interruptions have exacerbated the effects of previously reported barriers to accessing cancer care which was reportedly low even before the pandemic. If these effects are not mitigated, the achievements in cancer control that had already been made could be watered down. Measuring the impact of COVID-19 pandemic control measures on delivery of and access to cancer services in Uganda as well as other countries worldwide can inform the design of current and future responses to epidemics while putting into context other diseases like cancer that have a high burden.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care , Developing Countries , Health Promotion , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Mass Screening , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Quarantine , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Uganda/epidemiology
10.
Cancer Control ; 27(1): 1073274820960471, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772065

ABSTRACT

Early detection of cancer greatly increases the chances of better survival. The emergence of COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted several essential health services globally and early detection of cancer services is one of them. The routine cancer screenings have plummeted in many developed countries since the crisis. India has highest estimated lip and oral cavity cancer cases worldwide (119,992, 33.8%) and the secondhighest number of breast (162,468, 17.8%) and cervix uteri (96,922,30.7%) cancers in Asian sub-continent. Not only India has high burden of cancer, but the majority (75-80%) of patients have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Hence is it imperative that early detection services should be kept functional at out-patient settings so that at least the patients coming to hospitals with early signs and symptoms can be diagnosed as early as possible. Strategies need to be adopted to continue early detection services and ensure safety of patients and health care workers from COVID-19 transmission.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Mass Screening/methods , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Humans , India/epidemiology , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
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