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1.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-6, 2021 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075658

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare systems has been unprecedented, and the psychological effects on cancer patients and health care professionals are likely to be significant and long-lasting. The traditional methods of face-to-face health care interactions have been replaced by virtual consultations to reduce exposure to COVID-19 infection. This has put the healthcare professional under tremendous psychological pressure and led to considerable anxiety and distress among cancer patients. Treatment decisions have had to be adjusted to account for a healthcare system that has been temporarily consumed by the care of people with COVID-19, and this has put cancer patients at risk of inferior outcomes. This has had the potential to cause moral injury and psychological distress to health care professionals as well as patients, who have had to deal with a range of stressors due to the uncertainty, sense of loss of control, reduced accessibility to medications and social support, changes to personal circumstances (e.g. financial pressures) and fear of death due to COVID-19 infection. Long term consequences also include post-traumatic responses and complex grief reactions. Cancer services in particular should gear themselves to recognize and monitor these effects and allocate adequate resources to combat them in the months and years to come.

2.
Curr Oncol ; 29(10): 7059-7071, 2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065743

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness should be carefully evaluated and explicitly defined. To our knowledge, this is the first report to quantitatively evaluate humoral responses post 3 doses of SARS-CoV-2 immunization and prior to breakthrough COVID-19 infection in Canadian cancer patients. (2) Methods: In a prospective cohort study, we enrolled 185 cancer participants post COVID-19 vaccination in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. IgG antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain were quantified by immunoassay post three doses of immunization. With the COVID-19 rapid antigen test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 16 breakthrough infections were identified. Results: Following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination (including BNT162b2, AZD1222, and mRNA-1273), the mean serum anti-spike protein antibody level was 197.2 BAU/mL (binding antibody unit, SD ± 393.9), 1335.9 BAU/mL (±3337.8), and 3164.8 BAU/mL (±6500.9) post the first, second, and third dose of vaccination. Observed differences were significant (p ≤ 0.001). The average antibody level of 3164.8 BAU/mL post the third dose was 89.9 times that of the seroconversion level (35.2 BAU/mL). This indicates that most vaccines approved are effective in producing robust antibody responses. In 11 breakthrough cases confirmed by PCR, prior to infection, the average antibody concentration was 3675.6 BAU/mL with the highest concentration being 9107.4 BAU/mL. Compared with this average antibody concentration of 3675.6 BAU/mL (104.4 times that of the seroconversion concentration), 0% of single dosed, 9.6% of double vaccinated, and 29.5% of triple vaccinated cancer patients had higher SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels. When patients were split into hematological and solid cancer, the hematological cancer group demonstrated lower serological responses than the solid cancer group in the first and second doses (first dose, average concentration 11.1 vs. 201.4 BAU/mL, respectively, p < 0.05; second dose, average concentration 441.5 vs. 1725.9 BAU/mL, respectively, p < 0.05). There was no difference in the third dose level (1756.3 vs. 2548.0 BAU/mL, p = 0.21). (4) Conclusions: Most vaccines were effective in producing robust antibody responses when more than one dose was given, and the more doses the higher the serological response. Likely due to the highly contagious nature of SARS-CoV-2 variants, a significant number of participants had SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses lower than the average antibody concentration prior to the known breakthrough infections. Additional vaccination is likely required to ensure immunity against infection by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , BNT162 Vaccine , Prospective Studies , Antibodies, Viral , Immunization , Vaccination , Immunoglobulin G , Ontario
3.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics ; 114(3):e9-e9, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2036088

ABSTRACT

FAST-Forward trial reported that five-fraction radiotherapy (5fx-RT) schedule with 26 Gy in adjuvant setting after breast-conserving surgery for early-breast cancer (BC) was non-inferior to the standard hypo-fx (SHfx) schedule with 40 Gy in 15fx in terms of local tumor control. Since the COVID-19 pandemic started RT expert groups encouraged professionals to implement hypo-fx schedules in order to decrease visits of patients to hospitals. The aim of this study is to help radiation oncologists choose the most suitable patients for 5fx-RT schedule according to anatomical features. Between March 2020 and December 2021, 239 patients suitable for 5fx-RT schedule were referred to our department. Prescribed RT dose was 26 Gy in 5fx to the whole breast plus a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) up to 29 Gy to tumor bed if indicated. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group A: Patients treated with 5fx-RT schedule that met all the FAST-Forward constraints for normal tissues;Group B: Patients treated with 5fx-RT schedule that slightly did not meet all constraints, Group C: Patients switched to SHfx schedule as they did not meet constraints in an acceptable way. For each patient, we draw an imaginary straight line connecting the medial and lateral borders of PTV in the axial slice of simulation CT where the longest anteroposterior diameter was found. From midpoint of this line, we measured the tangent distance to PTV margin and collected the data as medial-to-lateral tangent (MELT). Data was analyzed using statistical software. 150 patients were included in group A, 75 in group B and 14 in group C. The median MELT distance was: 1.91cm, 2.48cm and 3cm respectively. We found that the increase in MELT distance was significantly associated with a poorer compliance of normal tissue constraints (p<0.0001). Patient´s distribution among 3 groups for MELT distance intervals are shown in table 1. Median V8 for ipsilateral lung was: 13.1, 15.46 and 20.49% for groups A, B and C respectively. For the heart, median mean dose was: 1.06, 1.8 and 2.25 Gy for left breast cancer patients and 0.28, 0.33 and 0.48 Gy for right breast cancer patients for groups A, B and C respectively. We found a moderate positive correlation between MELT distance and dosimetric parameters assessed above (r=0.545, 0.475 and 0.418 respectively). According to laterality, for a higher MELT distance the % of left BC patients increased significantly (p=0.039). MELT distance is an easy tool that helps radiation oncologists predict which BC patients are the most suitable for 5fx-RT before RT planning begins. This could avoid delays in starting RT for patients with a high MELT distance directly planning them with the SHfx schedule. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics is the property of Pergamon Press - An Imprint of Elsevier Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

4.
Cancers (Basel) ; 14(18)2022 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nutrition is essential to life and can have an indisputable influence on health and prevention of disease development including cancer. Methyl-donors are macronutrients that are important in achieving a healthy balance of metabolic processes. Their deficiency can lead to several symptoms and diseases-even to severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. We aimed to explore the potential protective effect of methyl-donor intake in breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancer by patient follow up. METHODS: A food frequency questionnaire and a diet diary were used to evaluate methyl-donor intake and blood samples were taken to evaluate Il-6 and IL-8 cytokine levels as well as MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism in breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients. RESULTS: We found that levels around the recommended daily intake of B6 and B9 were effective in supporting the overall survival of breast and colorectal, and a relatively higher level of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, patients. The total intake of methyl-donors significantly and negatively correlated with smoking in pancreatic cancer, while folate as well as betaine intake significantly and positively correlated with IL-8 in colorectal cancer patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the appropriate intake of methyl-donor can be an adjunct of conventional oncotherapy to improve quality of life. Whether methyl-donor intake supports cancer prevention and patient survival needs further confirmation in large patient cohorts.

5.
Cancer Nursing Practice ; 21(5):29-34, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025352

ABSTRACT

AUTH Why you should read this article: • To understand the clinical reasons for pre-treatment assessment of patients undergoing systemic anticancer therapy (SACT) • To appreciate the benefits of a digital SACT pre-assessment pathway for cancer patients • To familiarise yourself with the challenges of providing a digital service During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic measures have been implemented in healthcare systems to reduce transmission of the infection. People with cancer are immunocompromised and at higher risk of contracting infections, therefore many cancer services have been conducting routine reviews and pre-treatment assessments remotely through telephone and video consultations during the pandemic. Patients who are to receive systemic anticancer therapy (SACT) should have an additional consultation to provide them with specific information about the therapy, including side effects and who to contact for advice if they develop these at home. This article describes the development and implementation of a digital SACT pre-assessment pathway in a large university hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic, which aimed to deliver information to groups of patients remotely. The article explores the challenges to implementation and discusses some of the findings of a patient feedback survey, which suggest that the digital SACT pre-assessment sessions have been successful overall.

6.
World J Oncol ; 13(4): 172-184, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025722

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignant cancer in China. Considering the specific national conditions, no evidence is available for factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination in patients with breast cancer. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey, fielded from June 21 through June 27, 2021. A total of 944 nationally representative samples of Chinese breast cancer patients participating in the survey were included. Participant surveys included questions addressing who finished COVID-19 vaccination with the question "Have you taken the COVID-19 vaccine?", and response options were "Yes" and "No". Results: Overall, 730 (77.33%) women with breast cancer were unvaccinated, and only 214 (22.67%) were vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine. After adjusting for potential confounders, including both sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, we found that external support, including positive doctor suggestions (odds ratio (OR): 5.52; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.50 - 8.71; P < 0.0001), positive support from surrounding people (OR: 11.65; 95% CI: 7.57 - 17.91; P < 0.0001), and negative initiative from the community (OR: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.06 - 0.35; P < 0.0001), was associated with COVID-19 vaccination rates among breast cancer patients. These results remain stable in subgroup analyses. We found that most participants (82.52%) understood the necessity of COVID-19 vaccinations in China was strong; however, the recognition regarding the COVID-19 vaccine showed different patterns between vaccinated and unvaccinated participants. Conclusions: Our findings suggest external support, including vaccination suggestions from surgeons or oncologists, vaccination suggestions from associated people, and residents' committee mandated vaccinations, was associated with the COVID-19 vaccination rates. Interventions regarding these factors and improving publicity as well as education regarding COVID-19 vaccines among breast cancer patients are warranted.

7.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(8)2022 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccinations have the potential to significantly lower the burden of disease for many major infections in the high-risk population of hematological and oncological patients. In this regard Shingrix®, an inactivated Varicella Zoster Virus vaccine, received market approval in the European Union in March 2018, after prior US approval in October 2017, and recommendations specifically state immunocompromised, including oncological, patients. As vaccination rates are considered to be poor in oncological patients, determining the current vaccination rates for Shingrix® two years after market approval is important in defining the need for intervention to bring this potentially high-impact vaccine to the patients. METHODS: We analyzed data of the EVO Study to provide data for Herpes zoster vaccination rates in oncological patients. The EVO Study was an interventional study evaluating the potential of increasing vaccination rates of specified must-have vaccinations by an instructional card in the oncological setting. Numbers presented in this publication merged baseline data and follow-up data of the control group; hence data not affected by the intervention. RESULTS: Data of 370 patients were analyzed; 21.1% with hematological malignancies and 78.9% with solid cancer. Only 3.0% were vaccinated with Shingrix®. Patients with hematological malignancy were more likely to be vaccinated than those with solid cancer (7.7 vs. 1.7%). CONCLUSION: Despite clear recommendations and a pressing need in the high-risk population of hematological and oncological patients, the vast majority of patients are still left without vaccine protection against Herpes zoster by Shingrix®.

8.
Oncology Times ; 44(16):15-15, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2018115
9.
Indian Journal of Medical & Paediatric Oncology ; 43(4):369-375, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2016941

ABSTRACT

Introduction Advanced cancer patients often require clinic or hospital follow-up for their symptom control to maintain their quality of life. But it becomes difficult for the patients to attend the same due to financial, commutation, and logistic issues. Objective The aim of this study was to audit the telephonic calls of the service and prospectively collected data to understand the quality of service provided to the patients at follow-up. Materials and Methods An ambispective observational study was conducted on the advanced stage cancer patients referred to the palliative care department at Kolhapur Cancer Center, Kolhapur, Maharashtra. We conducted an audit of the 523 telephonic calls of our service—"PALLCARE Seva" from June 2020 to February 2021. Prospectively, we assessed the quality of service based on 125 telephonic calls (n = 125) for this;we designed a questionnaire consisting of 11 items on the 5-point Likert scale for satisfaction by the patients or their caregivers at the follow-up. After a pilot study, the final format of questionnaire was used to collect the data. Results Of the 523 calls attended, we provided 30.11% patients with dosage change of medications for their symptom management, 16.25% patients have liaised with local general practitioners, and 14.34% of cases had to be referred for emergency management to our hospitals. We provided 23.9% of them with emotional and bereavement support and 6.21% with smartphone-based or video-assisted guidance to the patients and caregivers. Conclusions Liaison of general practitioners was possible in more than one-tenth of cases. The core components of our service were politeness and caring attitude, helpfulness, handling doubts regarding the illness, and an opportunity to share thoughts from the patients or caregivers. More than three-fourth of the callers have rated their experience as satisfactory and would recommend this service to other patients in need. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Indian Journal of Medical & Paediatric Oncology is the property of Thieme Medical & Scientific Publishers Private Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Int J Cancer ; 2022 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013531

ABSTRACT

Previous studies on the immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines showed a reduced seroconversion in cancer patients. The aim of our study is to evaluate the immunogenicity of two doses of mRNA vaccines in solid cancer patients with or without a previous exposure to the virus. This is a single-institution, prospective, nonrandomized study. Patients in active treatment and a control cohort of healthy people received two doses of BNT162b2 (Comirnaty, BioNTech/Pfizer, The United States) or mRNA-1273 (Spikevax, Moderna). Vaccine was administered before starting anticancer therapy or on the first day of the treatment cycle. SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels against S1, RBD (to evaluate vaccine response) and N proteins (to evaluate previous infection) were measured in plasma before the first dose and 30 days after the second one. From January to June 2021, 195 consecutive cancer patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled. Thirty-one cancer patients had a previous exposure to SARS-CoV-2. Cancer patients previously exposed to the virus had significantly higher median levels of anti-S1 and anti-RBD IgG, compared to healthy controls (P = .0349) and to cancer patients without a previous infection (P < .001). Vaccine type (anti-S1: P < .0001; anti-RBD: P = .0045), comorbidities (anti-S1: P = .0274; anti-RBD: P = .0048) and the use of G-CSF (anti-S1: P = .0151) negatively affected the antibody response. Conversely, previous exposure to SARS-CoV-2 significantly enhanced the response to vaccination (anti-S1: P < .0001; anti-RBD: P = .0026). Vaccine immunogenicity in cancer patients with a previous exposure to SARS-CoV-2 seems comparable to that of healthy subjects. On the other hand, clinical variables of immune frailty negatively affect humoral immune response to vaccination.

11.
Psicooncologia ; 19(1):27-43, 2022.
Article in Spanish | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2011005

ABSTRACT

Objective: Covid-19 pandemic has had a profound emotional impact in general population and, especially, in patients with chronic diseases, like cancer patients. Moreover, it has placed unparalelled demands on healthcare systems. The aim of the present study is to explore this impact on oncology patients from their own experience, assess their coping strategies and also know their opinion about the healthcare assistance received. Method: One hundred and eighteen oncology patients from 5 different hospitals around Barcelona participated in the study. Data was collected using both HADS and an adhoc questionnaire which evaluated emotional distress, coping strategies, risk-contagion perception, social support and assessment of changes in healthcare assistance. Results: A total of 51.4% of the subjects presented high rates of anxiety and 36% depression. Worry (73.7%), fear (72.8%), anxiety and sadness (56.1%) were the most frequent emotions expressed. Around 74.1% of the sample felt very satisfied with the healthcare services and 94.6% felt supported by their health team. A 40.7% of the patients disagreed with telemedicine assessment, while 33.7% had predominantly a positive perception. Conclusions: Oncology patients considered that COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected their emotional status and quality of life. Getting to know patients' opinions about telemedicine may aid in facilitating care and improving its design to provide better and more efficient care. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) (Spanish) Objetivo: la pandemia por el COVID-19 esta generando un importante impacto emocional en la poblacion general y, en especial, en los pacientes cronicos, como los oncologicos. Ademas, ha supuesto cambios en la atencion sanitaria. El presente estudio pretende conocer este impacto, en la poblacion oncologica y, desde su propia experiencia, explorar sus estrategias de afrontamiento asi como conocer su opinion sobre la atencion sanitaria recibida. Metodologia: participaron 118 pacientes pertenecientes a 5 centros hospitalarios de la provincia de Barcelona. Los datos fueron recogidos a traves del cuestionario HADS y de un cuestionario ad-hoc para valorar el malestar emocional, las estrategias de afrontamiento, la percepcion de riesgo de contagio, el apoyo social y los cambios ocurridos en la atencion sanitaria. Resultados: el 51,4% de los participantes puntuaron alto en la escala de ansiedad y un 36% en la de depresion. La preocupacion (73,7%), el miedo (72,8%), la ansiedad (56,1%) y la tristeza (56,1%) fueron las emociones mas frecuentemente expresadas. El 74,1% se sintieron muy satisfechos con la atencion sanitaria recibida y el 94,6% refirieron haberse sentido acompanados por su equipo sanitario. Respecto a la valoracion de la telemedicina, un 40,7% manifestaron no estar a favor de esta alternativa mientras que el 33,7% consideraron que era una buena opcion. Conclusiones: los pacientes oncologicos consideran que la pandemia ha afectado negativamente a su estado emocional y su calidad de vida. Conocer la opinion que tienen los pacientes sobre la telemedicina nos puede ayudar a definir mas adecuadamente el uso de este tipo de asistencia. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
Front Oncol ; 12: 901426, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997472

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute severe forms of COVID-19 infection are more likely in cancer patients and growing attention has been given to the persistent symptoms of the disease after severe COVID-19. However, mild illness is the dominant clinical presentation of COVID-19 infection. To investigate patients' behavior and the short- and longer-term pattern of the disease in cancer patients with mild COVID infection, a longitudinal online survey was conducted for 16 months during the pandemic in a large cohort of cancer patients from a French COVID-19 hot spot. An online questionnaire was administered at three time points between the first wave of the pandemic in France and the fourth wave. The questionnaire was completed by 1415 to 2224 patients, which queried patients' demographics, their behavior, and COVID infection patterns. Seventy percent of the patients were female, and 40% had a comorbid condition. More than one-third of the participants had breast cancer, and half were survivors. The rate of infection was 30% during wave 1 and 10% in wave 4; most patients had a mild COVID-19 infection. Twenty-five percent of infected patients during wave 4 did not seek medical advice. At wave 4, 87% of the patients received at least one dose of vaccine. Systematic compliance to shielding measures decreased over time. The short-term pattern of mild COVID changed between wave 1 and wave 4. Twenty-two percent of infected patients experienced persistent signs for more than 6 months with a negative impact on sleep, social behavior, and increased consumption of stress-relieving drugs. Our results showed a high prevalence of long-lasting symptoms in cancer patients with mild COVID-19 infection and inadequate behavior toward the disease and prevention measures among patients.

13.
J Cancer Policy ; 34: 100359, 2022 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, COVID-19 greatly reduced healthcare accessibility and utilization by non-COVID patients including cancer. This study aimed to quantify and characterize cancer care adjustments experienced by cancer patients/survivors; and to explore their concerns, beliefs, and knowledge regarding COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire distributed through social media patients' groups (June-December 2020). Questionnaire included basic information, care adjustments (in "care provision" and in "treatment plan"), and patients' concerns, beliefs, and knowledge. Data description and analysis were done. RESULTS: Out of 300 participants, there were 68.0% on-treatment and 32.0% in follow-up stage. Care adjustments were reported by 29.7%; mostly in care provision (27.3%) rather than treatment plan (4.9%). Adjustments were less likely to occur when healthcare facility was in governorate other than that of residence (OR:0.53, 95%CI:0.30-0.96, P = 0.037) and more likely with long-standing diagnosis (≥12 months) compared with recent (<3 months) (adjusted-OR:4.13, 95%CI:1.19-14.34, P = 0.026). Lower proportion of on-treatment patients used remote consultation than patients in follow-up [4.4% versus 17.7%, P < 0.001]. Patients were concerned about fulfilling their care visits more than the probable COVID-19 infection (72.3%). It was uncommon to feel that the risk of COVID-19 infection is higher in care places than in the community (27.3%) or to feel safe with remote consultations (34.3%). However, patients increased their infection control practice (64.0%) and the majority were aware of their increased susceptibility to complications (86.0%). Somewhat, they were also concerned about the care quality (57.3%). Many had adequate access to COVID-19 information (69.0%) and their main sources were the Ministry of Health webpage and ordinary media (radio/TV). CONCLUSION: Cancer patients were primarily concerned about fulfilling their planned care and COVID-19 infection was less appreciated. POLICY SUMMARY: Launching of a policy for enhancement of telemedicine experience through more patients' engagement-as essential stakeholders-may be required. To heighten pandemic resilience for cancer care in Egypt, more investment in establishing specialized end-to-end cancer care facilities that ensure continuity of care may be justified.

14.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 898606, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993795

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The response is poorly understood to the third dose in patients with cancer who failed the standard dose of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines (CoronaVac). We aim to assess the immune response to the third dose and identify whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with serial serologic failure in patients with cancer. Methods: Solid cancer patients (SCP-N) and healthy controls (HCs) who were seronegative after the standard-dose vaccines in our previous study were prospectively recruited, from October 2021 to February 2022, to receive the third dose vaccines and anti-SARS-CoV-2S antibodies were measured. SCP-N who failed the third dose (serial seronegative group, SSG) were matched by propensity scores with the historical standard-dose positive cancer patient group (robust response group, RRG). An exploratory analysis was carried out to validate the role of vitamin D on the serology response. Results: The multi-center study recruited 97 SCP-N with 279 positive controls as RRG and 82 negative controls as HC group. The seroconversion rate after third-dose vaccination was higher in SCP-N than in HC (70.6% vs. 29.4%, p < 0.01). The matched comparison showed that patients in SSG had a significantly lower level of vitamin D and consumption rate than RRG or RRG-B (RRG with third-dose positive) (all p < 0.01). None had serious (over grade II) adverse events after the third dose. Conclusion: Solid cancer patients with second-dose vaccine failure may have a relatively poor humoral response to the third dose of COVID-19 vaccines as compared with the seronegative HC group. The consecutively poor humoral response could be associated with poor vitamin D levels and intake. Vitamin D status and cancer-related immune compromise may jointly affect the humoral response following booster vaccination.

15.
Oncology Practice Management ; 12(8):9-10, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1990081

ABSTRACT

The article discusses results of a study conducted by of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on COVID-19 in Oncology Registry that were presented during the 2022 ASCO meeting. Topics discussed include that in America African-American patients with cancer and COVID-19 were more likely to have delays or disruptions in cancer treatment during the pandemic, discussed reasons by Dr. Jessica Islam for delay in treatment and also discussed second analysis on rural versus urban patients.

16.
J Med Virol ; 94(12): 5827-5835, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990501

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to understand the suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts among cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data were collected from patients diagnosed with cancer while attending the largest cancer center in the south of China. A structured questionnaire was used to investigate patients' demographic data, suicidal behavior, and factors related to COVID-19. Mental health conditions were measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. Comorbidities and medical conditions of cancer patients were extracted from the electronic healthcare records. Among the 5670 cancer patients, 755 (13.3%) reported suicidal ideation, and 266 (4.7%) reported suicidal attempts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The age group with the highest risk of suicidal ideation was 20-24 years (23.9%). Lifetime history of suffering from mental disorders, longer time since cancer diagnosis, regional and distant tumor stage, depression, anxiety, hostility, having a higher frequency of worrying about cancer management due to COVID-19, higher frequency feeling of overwhelming psychological pressure due to COVID-19, having a higher level of barriers to manage cancer due to COVID-19, and higher barriers to continue treatment of cancer due to inconveniences caused by COVID-19, were all significantly associated with increased risk of suicidal ideation. We also identified the risk factors of suicide attempts. This is the first study investigating the prevalence and risk factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts in Chinese cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings suggest that it is essential to monitor the mental health conditions of this vulnerable population, especially for cancer patients who have comorbidity with a history of mental disorders. Also, government policymakers should take action to protect cancer patients to avoid any interruption of their continued treatment. Further efforts are urgently required to develop specific psychological interventions to reduce the risk factors among cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Young Adult
17.
Front Public Health ; 10: 888335, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987584

ABSTRACT

Early 2020 witnessed the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic followed by a nationwide lockdown in the whole history for the first time. In this raising dilemma, multiple countries had a serious impact on their international trade, especially during the lockdown. It is also widely accepted that the lives of individuals had been changing ever since the spread of COVID-19. Several other sectors were badly affected during the pandemic. For the above reasons, service industries had a significant impact before and after the pandemic. Based on the data collected, it was identified that the pandemic affected the service industries, enterprises, and other organizations that contribute to the economic growth of the nation. It was also found that the pandemic has adversely impacted private and public enterprises. In addition, the study examined the impact of COVID-19 on China's international trade using artificial intelligence and blockchain technology. Another objective of the article is to examine the impact of big data on China's international trade. The study suggests upgrading the trading policies of China to deal with the challenges being faced in the trading industry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Artificial Intelligence , Big Data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Internationality
18.
EClinicalMedicine ; 52: 101608, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1982942

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited data exists regarding the efficacy of ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 vaccine against Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) in solid cancer patients. We aimed to assess the immunogenicity of the ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 vaccine and the impact of different anticancer therapies for solid malignancies on immune response. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal observational study of immunogenicity following ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 vaccination among 385 solid cancer patients on active cancer treatment was conducted in two oncology centers. Participants received the first dose between June 18 and July 27, 2021 and the second dose at 8-10 weeks later. Blood samples were evaluated for total immunoglobulins against the receptor-binding of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (anti-RBD total-Ig) before, and 4-week after the first- and second-doses. The primary endpoint was the geometric mean titers (GMT) of antibody among solid cancer patients compared to healthy controls and the impact of different cancer treatment types. Findings: Among solid cancer patients, the antibody level increased more slowly to significantly lower levels than achieved in healthy controls. The GMT at 4-weeks post-vaccination in cancer vs. healthy were 224.5 U/ml (95%CI 176.4-285.6) vs. 877.1 U/ml (95%CI 763.5-1008), p<0.0001), respectively. For different types of cancer treatments, chemotherapy agents, especially anthracyclines (GMR 0.004; 95%CI 0.002-0.008), paclitaxel (GMR 0.268; 95%CI 0.123-0.581), oxaliplatin (GMR 0.340; 95%CI 0.165-0.484), and immunotherapy (GMR 0.203; 95%CI 0.109-0.381) showed significantly lower antibody response. Anti-HER2, endocrine therapy and 5-fluouracil or gemcitabine, however, had less impact on the immune response. Interpretation: Suboptimal and heterogeneous immunologic responses were observed in cancer patients being treated with different systemic treatments. Immunotherapy or chemotherapy significantly suppressed the antibody response. Funding: Quality Improvement Fund, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, The Thai Red Cross Society and Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology at Chulalongkorn University and Chulalongkorn Medical Oncology Research Fund.

19.
Cancers (Basel) ; 14(15)2022 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969100

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccines have become an integral element in the protection of cancer patients against SARS-CoV-2. To date, there are no direct comparisons of the course of COVID-19 infection in cancer patients between the pre- and post-vaccine era. We analyzed SARS-CoV-2 infections and their impact on cancer in COVID-19 vaccinated and non-vaccinated patients from three German cancer centers. Overall, 133 patients with SARS-CoV-2 were enrolled in pre- and post-vaccine eras: 84 non-vaccinated and 49 vaccinated, respectively. A mild course of COVID-19 was documented more frequently in vaccinated patients (49% vs. 29%), while the frequency of severe and critical courses occurred in approximately one-half of the non-vaccinated patients (22% vs. 42%, p = 0.023). Particularly, patients with hematologic neoplasms benefited from vaccination in this context (p = 0.031). Admissions to intermediate- and intensive-care units and the necessity of non-invasive and invasive respiratory support were reduced by 71% and 50% among vaccinated patients, respectively. The median length of admission was 11 days for non-vaccinated and 5 days for vaccinated patients (p = 0.002). COVID-19 mortality was reduced by 83% in vaccinated patients (p = 0.046). Finally, the median time from SARS-CoV-2 infection to restarting cancer therapy was 12 and 26 days among vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups, respectively (p = 0.002). Although this study does not have enough power to perform multivariate analyses to account for confounders, it provides data on COVID-19 in non-vaccinated and vaccinated cancer patients and illustrates the potential benefits of COVID-19 vaccines for these patients.

20.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(7): 2415-2420, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1965071

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To analyze the impact of treatment delay caused by COVID-19 infection on patients scheduled for radiotherapy treatment. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this descriptive study, we analyzed all patients who were COVID-19 positive during the scheduled radiotherapy course, those who had an infection while on neoadjuvant treatment period, or during surgery before the start of radiation. The study period was from June 2020 to May 2021. A treatment delay was defined as a delay in starting the radiation treatment, a gap during their scheduled radiation treatment, or treatment discontinuation. All patients who had a treatment delay were followed-up till November 2021. RESULTS: The median follow-up time of the study was 13 months. Ninety-four patients were selected for the study who met the inclusion criteria. Seventy-seven patients had a mild COVID-19 infection, while 17 had a moderate to severe illness. Of the entire cohort, 83 patients had a treatment delay. The median treatment delay (MTD) in days was 18 (6 to 47). Amongst those who had a treatment delay, 66 patients were treated with curative intent, of which 51 patients are on follow-up - 34 patients are disease-free (MTD - 18.5, 10 to 43), seven had either a residual disease or locoregional recurrence (MTD - 22, 10 to 32), seven had distant metastasis (MTD - 18, 15 to 47), and three patients died (MTD - 20, 8 to 27). Of three patients who died, only one died of COVID-19-related causes. CONCLUSIONS: Even though the mortality due to COVID-19 infection among those who underwent radiotherapy was low, a treatment delay might have caused adverse treatment outcomes. Longer follow-up of these patients is required to further establish this. It will remain debatable whether it was worth delaying radiotherapy for mild to moderate COVID-19 infection for a significant time to cause a potential cancer treatment failure.

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