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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 757, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professional calling (PC) is crucial for ascertaining their professional goals and fulfilling career choices in nursing students. Thus, understanding its antecedents and helping schools improve PC among nursing students is critical. This study aims to explore whether professional identity (PI), as a crucial antecedent of PC, acts as an intermediary between career self-efficacy (CSE) and professional calling during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A sample of 565 nursing students were selected by a web-based survey through convenience sampling. The study was conducted from October to November 2020. Measures of CSE, PI, and PC were assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed demographic data and the correlation of the research variables. The significance of the mediation effect was assessed using a bootstrap method with SPSS. RESULTS: CSE during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak (r = 0. 359, p < 0. 01) and PI (r = 0. 670, p < 0. 01) were both relevant to PC among nursing students. In addition, CSE had a positive indirect effect on PC through PI (ß = 0. 288, p < 0. 05). CONCLUSIONS: Higher scores in CSE and a better PI were associated with PC in nursing students. Furthermore, a better CSE had an indirect effect on the PC of students through PI. The favorable evidence in our study confirms that nursing educators can adopt PI interventions to improve the sense of PC among nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Pandemics , Career Choice , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
40th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication, SIGDOC 2022 ; : 154-156, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2108344

ABSTRACT

Currently, there is a lack of guidance for how individuals in the field of technical communication can confidently take a leave of absence without concern for how time away can impact career progression. Leaves of absence are on the rise in the wake of the COVID-19 global pandemic as employees struggle to find work-life balance and provide care for young children and aging parents. During the COVID-19 global pandemic, I gave birth to my son and took a 20-week parental leave of absence from my company. During this time, I continued to professionally develop while also taking time to recover and care for my family. I gained valuable insight into how to maintain the momentum of my career development and want to share the lessons I learned. This Industry Insight Report provides recommendations for planning for a leave of absence, setting goals and boundaries for the time away from work, maintaining career momentum while on leave, gracefully returning to work, and reassessing your work upon your return to ensure that your daily career responsibilities align with both your passion and team goals. This period of discernment allows you to reflect on what work is most important to you and what work helps you to evolve as a technical communicator. With reflection, reassessment, and planned enrichment, you can grow your career in a meaningful way even while you are away from your keyboard. © 2022 ACM.

3.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108143

ABSTRACT

The Society for Pediatric Anesthesia launched the Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) in 2018 to empower highly productive women pediatric anesthesiologists to achieve equity, promotion, and leadership. WELI is focused on six career development domains: promotion and leadership, networking, conceptualization and completion of projects, mentoring, career satisfaction, and sense of well-being. We sought feedback about whether WELI supported members' career development by surveys emailed in November 2020 (baseline), May 2021 (6 months), and January 2022 (14 months). Program feedback was quantitatively evaluated by the Likert scale questions and qualitatively evaluated by extracting themes from free-text question responses. The response rates were 60.5% (92 of 152) for the baseline, 51% (82 of 161) for the 6-month, and 52% (96 of 185) for the 14-month surveys. Five main themes were identified from the free-text responses in the 6- and 14-month surveys. Members reported that WELI helped them create meaningful connections through networking, obtain new career opportunities, find tools and projects that supported their career advancement and promotion, build the confidence to try new things beyond their comfort zone, and achieve better work-life integration. Frustration with the inability to connect in-person during the coronavirus-19 pandemic was highlighted. Advisors further stated that WELI helped them improve their mentorship skills and gave them insight into early career faculty issues. Relative to the baseline survey, protégés reported greater contributions from WELI at 6 months in helping them clarify their priorities, increase their sense of achievement, and get promoted. These benefits persisted through 14 months. Advisors reported a steady increase in forming new meaningful relationships and finding new collaborators through WELI over time. All the members reported that their self-rated mentoring abilities improved at 6 months with sustained improvement at 14 months. Thus, programs such as WELI can assist women anesthesiologists and foster gender equity in career development, promotion, and leadership.

4.
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism ; : 1-34, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2106818

ABSTRACT

This study, drawing on a questionnaire survey conducted among UK hospitality workers in July 2021, aims to ascertain factors affecting intention to leave the hospitality industry. In particular, it seeks to find out how the interplay between negative moods, job satisfaction, career satisfaction, work experience and perceived organizational support (POS) influences this key variable. The results indicate that there was a negative relationship between job satisfaction and intention to leave the industry, as well as between career satisfaction and the latter variable. We also found a positive relationship between job satisfaction and career satisfaction. There was a positive association between negative moods and turnover intention. Crucially, POS had a direct positive effect on job satisfaction and a negative one on negative moods. Although the direct effect of POS on turnover intention was insignificant, the indirect effects of POS on the dependent variable through job satisfaction and negative moods, and, sequentially, through job satisfaction and career satisfaction were significant. It also turned out that, contrary to our a priori assumptions, work experience did not moderate the relationship between career satisfaction and intention to leave. The study concludes by discussing the theoretical and practical implications of the findings. [ FROM AUTHOR]

5.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 3146-3156, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Role models are essential in medical education, yet empirical research is relatively insufficient on the influence of prosocial modelling on medical students' career commitment. The prosocial behaviour of medical staff involved in the fight against the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at the beginning of 2020 presents an opportunity to fill the research gap. We explored and compared the different associations of the two most important role models for medical students - parents and faculty- with medical students' career commitment. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted with 99,559 undergraduate students majoring in clinical medicine in mainland China. Questions were asked to collect information about participants in the battle against COVID-19, medical students' determination to practice medicine after graduation, as well as students' socio-demographic characteristics. Chi-square tests and hierarchical regressions were performed to examine the associations between parent and faculty involvement and students' career commitment. RESULTS: The results showed statistically significant associations between prosocial modelling during the COVID-19 pandemic in China and students' intention to pursue medical careers. The association of faculty involvement (OR = 1.165, p < .001) with students' career commitment was greater than that of parents (OR = 0.970, p > .05). For faculty involvement, the association was stronger among male students (OR = 1.323, p < .001) and students who were already determined to be doctors (OR = 1.219, p < .001) before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides new evidence on the potential roles of parents and faculty in shaping medical students' career commitment. Encouraging faculty to act as positive role models could help medical students increase their intention to become doctors.KEY MESSAGESProsocial modelling could enhance students' intention to pursue medical careers.The association of prosocial behaviour of faculty is larger than that of parents on medical students.Those who have prior medical career commitment are much more likely to persist in the medical profession, and prosocial modelling of faculty is positively associated with their medical career commitment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Male , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Faculty , Parents
6.
Teach Learn Nurs ; 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096061

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 control measures influenced education and training environments and profoundly impacted nursing students' career prospects and academic lives. This study intends to elucidate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing students' academic experience and career choices. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted at a four-year university in Japan, using semi-structured interviews with 14 nursing students. Sandelowski's qualitative descriptive analysis was conducted. We identified 11 categories that summarize COVID-19's influence on students' academic experience and career choices: "Forced change to a new learning system," "Difficult learning thoroughly with restricted face-to-face interactions," "Worries regarding teacher evaluations when face-to-face interactions are restricted," "Adapting to changes in the learning environment," "Finding new ways to learn due to the different learning environment," "Worries regarding career decision-making after losing opportunities to obtain career information", "Fully utilizing limited information resources in deciding where to work while being influenced by others," "Coping with a confusing new job hunting system," "Worries about becoming a nurse without enough practical experience," "Conscious of working as a nurse while facing infections," and "Support from those around me is helpful in an unfamiliar environment." The categories comprised four elements: academic impact, employment/career impact, future impact on working as a nurse, and environmental support. Building an online education/training program, ensuring the availability of regular psychological support, providing abundant information on employment, installing an information desk, and providing regular feedback were considered imperative for supporting nursing students.

7.
J Surg Educ ; 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095711

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The abrupt cessation of in-person education due to the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult for preclerkship students to explore a career in surgery. To supplement the lack of exposure, the Surgical Exploration and Discovery (SEAD) program was transitioned to an entirely virtual format. This study aims to describe the virtual SEAD program and evaluate its effectiveness as a career decision-making (CDM) intervention. DESIGN: The week-long program was delivered on Microsoft Teams, featured 11 surgical specialties, and comprised four activities: live demonstrations, virtual operating room observerships, career talks, and technical skills workshops. The program was evaluated using the four levels of the Kirkpatrick model: (1) reactions, (2) knowledge, (3) CDM behaviors - assessed using the Career Decision-making Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ) - and (4) results. The latter was indirectly assessed using CDDQ scores from an in-person SEAD program, where lower CDDQ scores indicate less difficulty with CDM. SETTING: Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Forty pre-clerkship students (27 first and 13 second year students) at the University of Ottawa RESULTS: Level 1: 97.5% of participants rated the program as good or very good. Live demonstration and technical skills workshops were the highest rated activities. Level 2: participants' scores on knowledge-based questions about a surgical career significantly increased following the program (pre: 9/25 vs post: 15/25, p = 0.008). Level 3: overall mean CDDQ scores (±SD) decreased difficulties with significantly following the program (pre: 45.6 ± 10.5 vs post: 38.8 ± 10.9, p < 0.001), which indicates decreased CDM difficulties. Level 4: Except for one sub-category, the difference in mean CDDQ scores between the virtual and in-person programs were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: The program received the positive reactions and significantly increased participants' knowledge. The change in CDDQ scores following the virtual program suggests it may reduce career decision-making difficulties in the short-term. In-person surgical exposure remains important; however, a hybrid model may be valuable in resource limited settings. WC: 300.

8.
Arrancada ; 22(42):172-182, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2092749

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected the world population by modifying the usual way in which daily activities are carried out. One sector that has had to face drastic changes is the education sector. The objective of the research is to analyze the resilience of the students of the second level of the Physical Activity career of the Pedagogy Faculty during the Covid-19 pandemic. Although previous research dealt with the subject in other teachings and other careers, they did not reach the case of university students nor did they evaluate academic stress in conditions of SARS-CoV-2: with an international affectation for all social sectors and for styles of learning. student life at any level. Students of the second level of the Technical University of Esmeraldas were taken as a sample, in the second semester of 2020. The research is specifically framed in these students, not only because it is the field of work of the researchers, but also because of the characteristics that it implies. belong to the university sector and to that particular career. The quantitative field study involved a sample of 37 students and applied the Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale as an instrument. It was concluded that 46% of the students reflect a high level of resilience and 49% a moderate level. The importance of the work prevails mainly in its contribution to the treatment of adverse circumstances for the student sector of sports and physical culture and the treatment of the teacher towards them.

9.
SA Journal of Human Resource Management ; 20, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2090518

ABSTRACT

Orientation: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had profound consequences on all sectors of the economy. This global pandemic threatens the sustainability of all sectors, including higher education. Research purpose: This study aimed to investigate talent development strategies that promote the sustainability of higher education institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Motivation for the study: Several higher education institutions are struggling to survive during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this study is motivated by the need to promote the sustainability of South African higher education institutions through talent development. Research approach/design and method: A quantitative research approach was adopted to quantify the research phenomenon. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the data from 265 academics in three South African universities. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 27.0, was used to analyse the data. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and factor analysis were computed to determine the reliability and validity of the questionnaire. Pearson’s correlations and regression analysis were used to determine the relationship between talent development strategies and sustainability. Main findings: The results showed that talent development strategies (training and development as well as career development) positively influenced the sustainability of South African universities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Practical/managerial implications: Universities can obtain sustainability through investment in their intellectual capital. This can be achieved through continuous training and development as well as career development. Contribution/value-addition: The study expands on limited empirical research on talent development and sustainable competitive advantage. © 2022. The Authors. Licensee: AOSIS.

10.
Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience ; : 25-37, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087959

ABSTRACT

During the rapid transition online, university educators had to reconsider how they supported students with disabilities and neurological differences in accessing a high-quality remote learning experience. This chapter explores my personal experiences as an Early Career Academic (ECA) tasked with supporting our faculty during the transition to remote learning. By collating my personal experiences leading up to and throughout this period, I reflect on my own coping strategies required to fulfill this role. I also explore the forms of resilience that I utilised to support my colleagues who had a spectrum of perspectives and knowledge of inclusive digital pedagogies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

11.
Transp Policy (Oxf) ; 128: 179-192, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086784

ABSTRACT

The aviation industry is in a recession with the rapid and immense outbreak of COVID-19 under globalisation. The future young aviation professionals might suffer from a 'career shock'. This study analysed the post-pandemic career prospects for Hong Kong aviation students using mixed-method research considering specialised and licensed training. We conducted a survey (N = 101) and focus group interviews (N = 6) to investigate students' perceived impediments and potential support from the institutions. Matt-Whitney U test is used to compare the perceptual difference in the impediments, career prospects, skills required, and institutional supports between (non-)specialised training students, (non-)engineering-related students, and (non-)final-year students. The results demonstrated no significant difference between students with and without specialised training. While final-year students perceive themselves as lacking more in terms of non-technical skills than non-final-year students, students are interested in broadening their career options to include airline operations, aircraft engineering and maintenance via acquiring a variety of emerging knowledge and technical skills. Given most studies focus on the recovery pattern of the aviation industry, this study is original in considering Hong Kong aviation students' career impediments and prospects using a mixed-method approach to provide policy insights.

12.
Tour Manag Perspect ; 44: 101039, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086776

ABSTRACT

By applying the protection motivation theory, the study aims to investigate factors influencing tourism and hospitality (T&H) workers' career resilience when faced with health-related risks at work during a pandemic. Data were collected from 495 part-time and full-time employees in the Vietnamese tourism and hospitality sector. The study found that workers' perceived vulnerability and perceived severity of the pandemic were positively associated with career resilience. Perceived severity was positively related to self-efficacy and response efficacy, while perceived vulnerability was positively associated with self-efficacy only. Both self-efficacy and response efficacy positively influenced career resilience through the mediating role of health risk preventative behavior. Theoretically, the study advances the stream of research in resilience in general and career resilience in particular among T&H workers when faced with a health-related crisis. Practical implications are provided with recommendations on how to facilitate career resilience among T&H employees working in the current high-risk environment.

13.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(6): e899, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085040

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: The decision to stay in nursing has been challenged by the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. New nurses joined the workforce and provided care to patients with COVID-19 although they received limited training, which could have influenced their intention to stay in nursing. We aimed in this study to examine the impact of caring for patients with COVID-19 on career decisions, resilience, and perceived self-efficacy among newly hired nurses in Jordan. It also tested the predictors of intentions to stay among new nurses. Methods: This cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted using an online electronic questionnaire form. The sample included newly hired nurses (n = 300) working in public hospitals and providing care to patients with COVID-19 in different levels of acuity units. The perceived stress scale and Connor-Davidson resilience scale 25 were used to measure stress and resilience among nurses. Results: The majority chose nursing as their career, but they were not satisfied with the current work conditions or autonomy in decision-making. Many nurses reported having moderate to high work-related stress and low to moderate resilience. Among all variables in this study, financial income predicted mild intention to stay in nursing. Conclusions: Nurses expressed the presence of work-related stress and low to moderate levels of resilience. As new nurses, exposure to these stress levels might lead to burnout. Nursing managers should take necessary measures to promote better work conditions and improve resilience to avoid nurses leaving the profession at times when there is a shortage.

14.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-346218

ABSTRACT

We re-visited an early paper that dealt with long-term unemployment in light of the pandemic and its negative impact on this particular group that has been severely hit. We still argue that while the study of human work and the workplace occupies a central place in scientific thought and discourse, less attention is given to the unemployment phenomenon and far less to the long-term unemployment experience. Focusing on the latter, this paper offers food for thought for both policy makers and practitioners via a multi-level interventional model. We explore policy aspects that carry implications for vocational evaluation and career assessment practitioners working with the unemployed, and particularly the long term unemployed population.

15.
Front Psychol ; 13: 906108, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080250

ABSTRACT

At the 2019 and 2021 International Conference on Environmental Psychology, discussions were held on the future of conferences in light of the enormous greenhouse gas emissions and inequities associated with conference travel. In this manuscript, we provide an early career researcher (ECR) perspective on this discussion. We argue that travel-intensive conference practices damage both the environment and our credibility as a discipline, conflict with the intrinsic values and motivations of our discipline, and are inequitable. As such, they must change. This change can be achieved by moving toward virtual and hybrid conferences, which can reduce researchers' carbon footprints and promote equity, if employed carefully and with informal exchange as a priority. By acting collectively and with the support of institutional change, we can adapt conference travel norms in our field. To investigate whether our arguments correspond to views in the wider community of ECRs within environmental psychology, we conducted a community case study. By leveraging our professional networks and directly contacting researchers in countries underrepresented in those networks, we recruited 117 ECRs in 32 countries for an online survey in February 2022. The surveyed ECRs supported a change in conference travel practices, including flying less, and perceived the number of researchers wanting to reduce their travel emissions to be growing. Thirteen percent of respondents had even considered leaving academia due to travel requirements. Concerning alternative conference formats, a mixed picture emerged. Overall, participants had slightly negative evaluations of virtual conferences, but expected them to improve within the next 5 years. However, ECRs with health issues, facing visa challenges, on low funding, living in remote areas, with caretaking obligations or facing travel restrictions due to COVID-19 expected a switch toward virtual or hybrid conferences to positively affect their groups. Participants were divided about their ability to build professional relationships in virtual settings, but believed that maintaining relationships virtually is possible. We conclude by arguing that the concerns of ECRs in environmental psychology about current and alternative conference practices must be taken seriously. We call on our community to work on collective solutions and less travel-intensive conference designs using participatory methods.

16.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-8, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077358

ABSTRACT

Objective: To understand the biopsychosocial dimensions of university health sciences students' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants: Health sciences students (n = 297) from two universities in July and August 2020. Methods: Participants completed a Web-based survey asking about depression, anxiety, physical activity, coronavirus threat, and career commitment. Results: Moderate or severe depression and anxiety were reported by 28.6% and 31.3% of respondents, respectively. Depression and anxiety were positively correlated with perceived coronavirus threat and negatively correlated with career commitment and strenuous physical activity. A change in career commitment interests during the COVID-19 pandemic was reported by 11% of respondents. Conclusions: Identified factors that could be targeted by universities to support their students and secure career commitment include online learning challenges, ability to secure clinical placements, mental health (anxiety and depression), financial challenges, family pressure, and promotion of physical activity.

17.
International Journal of Innovation and Learning ; 32(3):322-340, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070791

ABSTRACT

Today's youth face prejudice and stereotyping in the workplace;in times of crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, their prevalence and strength may increase. We conducted a qualitative study of social representations of key exchange partners - leaders and career beginners. In the first phase, we conducted semi-structured interviews to identify the dominant social representations that small business leaders (N = 9) hold about career beginners. In the second phase, we examined how future career beginners (N = 26) responded to five hypothetical work situations based on the leaders' social representations. The social exchange partners shared the narrative that career growth, advancement, and financial incentives are important motivators for career beginners, but contradicted each other in their accounts of career beginners' initiative levels and in their accounts of preferred leadership styles. The findings help to raise awareness of the mutual representations and expectations of different age groups in the work context.

18.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070204

ABSTRACT

Purpose Given that the recovery of the hospitality industry is hampered by worker shortages resulting from the loss of talents during the ongoing pandemic, the purpose of this study is to examine how professional identity affects hospitality employees' psychological responses to the COVID-19 crisis and their intentions to leave the industry. Design/methodology/approach This study sample consisted of 1,188 US hospitality employees. The cross-sectional data were analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling, analysis of variance and multigroup analysis. Findings A double-barreled effect of professional identity on career change intention was identified. Hospitality employees possessing a stronger professional identity were found to be more passionate and satisfied with their careers and less likely to switch to other industries. However, these individuals also feel more distressed by the pandemic crisis, which is associated with a heightened level of career change intentions. Research limitations/implications The findings of this study confirm the importance of identity building as a means of sustaining the hospitality workforce. As nascent professionals possess a weaker identity and stronger intention to leave the industry, immediate attention should be paid to these individuals. Originality/value This study expands the knowledge surrounding the influences of hospitality professional identity as it exerts a double-barreled effect on career change intention. Further insights regarding how hospitality employees at various career stages respond differently to the COVID-19 crisis are uncovered by examining the moderating effects of industry experience.

19.
ICES Journal of Marine Science ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070115

ABSTRACT

The worldwide disruption caused by the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically impacted the activities of marine scientists working towards the goals of the UN Ocean Decade. As in other disciplines, marine early-career researchers (ECRs) are essential contributors to the development of novel and innovative science. Based on a survey of 322 of our peers, we show that the pandemic negatively impacted marine ECRs in ways that further exacerbate existing structural challenges such as social isolation, job insecurity, and short-term contracts, competitive funding, and work pressure. Furthermore, we find that the success and wellbeing of marine ECRs depends heavily on networking opportunities, gaining practical experience, collecting data, and producing publications, all of which were disrupted by the pandemic. Our analysis shows that those in the earliest stages of their careers feel most vulnerable to long-term career disadvantage as a result of the pandemic. This paper contributes to the empirical body of work about the impacts of the pandemic on marine science and offers recommendations on how marine ECRs should be supported to achieve the UN Ocean Decade's goal of producing "the science we need for the ocean we want".

20.
Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Education ; : 1-11, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070003

ABSTRACT

Minimizing the gap between students' expectations and company value propositions is essential to improve the professional development of students, reduce turnover and foster organizational commitment, and so, career advisors have become key players to connect students with potential employers. This is especially relevant in this COVID-19 time when millions of jobs have been destroyed and there is a high level of uncertainty regarding what will happen in the future. Thus, the aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between students' personality traits and their most valued aspects when looking for a job, to gain insights into how to maximize their matching. Data from 225 hospitality undergraduate students were analyzed regarding their personality traits and preferences. Results showed a positive relationship between the latter two, with personality traits shaped by work experience and gender. These insights contribute to extend career advisor tools to guide students toward the company most suitable for them.

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