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2.
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819361

ABSTRACT

Background Public health restrictions due to the COVID-19 (SARS CoV-2) pandemic have disproportionately affected informal caregivers of people living with long term health conditions. We aimed to explore levels of care burden, loneliness, and social isolation among caregivers of people with enduring physical and brain health conditions in English-speaking regions worldwide, by investigating outcomes before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A cross-sectional anonymous online survey data from 2287 English-speaking caregivers of people with long term health conditions from four English-speaking regions (UK, Ireland, USA, New Zealand) included measures of care burden, loneliness, and social isolation, reported before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Analyses were descriptive, followed by an ordinal regression model for predictors of burden. Results Compared to pre-pandemic levels, all caregivers experienced a significant increase in burden, loneliness, and isolation. Caregivers of people with both brain health and physical conditions were the most burdened and had the highest levels of loneliness and isolation compared to caregivers of people with either a brain health or physical condition only. The increase in care burden among caregivers of people with brain health challenges was associated with caregiver?s gender, moderate and severe emotional loneliness, magnitude and frequency of isolation during the pandemic, and care circumstances (cohabitation with the care recipient, restrictions on the ability to provide care). Conclusions Health and social care interventions should target caregivers? care circumstances and psychological outcomes, particularly in women, accounting for the significant additional burden of care, loneliness, and isolation resulting from pandemic-related restrictions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

3.
Revista de Neuro-Psiquiatria ; 85(1):66-71, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818927

ABSTRACT

Patients with eating disorder (ED) are a vulnerable population in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some studies describe its negative effect on ED patients and their caregivers. This article presents a narrative review of the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on these patients. Depressive and anxious symptoms, risk of self-harm and suicide are identified. Early intervention and management of patients with ED is a great challenge to the continuity of treatment, detection of comorbidities and relapse prevention.

4.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(T7):63-67, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818256

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stroke is known as chronic disease, leading to disability which makes help from caregivers become necessary. Attending stroke patients possess certain challenges and burdens toward the caregivers. AIM: We aim to investigate risk factors related to depression among caregivers attending post-ischemic stroke. METHODS: Eighty-three caregivers and post-ischemic stroke patients were collected consecutively from the Neurology Department of Universitas Sumatera Utara Hospital, Medan, Indonesia. Linear regression was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Our multivariate study shows that patient’s age, caregiver’s gender, patient’s gender, and modified Barthel Index are associated with depression with adjusted R2 of 59.3%. CONCLUSION: Early detection and intervention should be addressed regularly for caregivers attending post-stroke patients.

5.
Vaccines ; 10(3), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818227

ABSTRACT

Child care providers, including family child care (FCC) providers, are viewed as trusted sources of information for the parents and families they serve, and their vaccine behavior has been shown to be associated with parent beliefs and behaviors. This study sought to describe the COVID-19 vaccine behaviors and attitudes among FCC providers in Delaware. An online survey was distributed to all licensed FCC providers (N = 541) in September 2021. Survey items were drawn from validated instruments and assessed vaccination status, attitudes, and confidence in their ability to discuss COVID-19 vaccines with families. In total, 168 responses were recorded (31% response rate);69.8% of respondents were fully vaccinated against COVID-19. The majority indicated that they would require (11.4%) or recommend (42.1%) the vaccine for children in their care, once approved by the FDA. Providers reported high levels of confidence in their ability to discuss both the benefits and risks of COVID-19 vaccines. FCC providers should be considered key messengers for the families they serve and may be helpful liaisons with state and local vaccination efforts. Input from FCC providers could be used to develop vaccine messaging and materials that are clear, consistent, and culturally responsive to the families of the children in their care.

6.
Pilot and Feasibility Studies ; 8(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1817283

ABSTRACT

Background: With increasing numbers of people living with dementia relying on family to care for them at home, there is an urgent need for practical and evidence-based programs to support carers in maintaining their mental health and well-being. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of a modified STrAtegies for RelaTives (START) program delivered online (START-online). Method: A mixed-methods non-blinded evaluation of START-online (using Zoom as videoconferencing platform) for acceptability and feasibility (completion rates and qualitative feedback through surveys and focus groups) and quantitative evaluation. This occurred at the National Ageing Research Institute, in metropolitan Victoria, Australia. Results: Twenty-nine eligible carers were referred, 20 (70%) consented to the study. Of these, 16 (80%) completed all 8 sessions, 2 completed only 3 sessions, and 2 withdrew. Carers’ qualitative feedback indicated that the therapist interaction was valued, content and online delivery of the program was acceptable. Feedback was mixed on the appropriate stage of caring. Conclusion: START-online was feasible and acceptable for carers, including those living outside of metropolitan areas who might otherwise be unable to access face-to-face programs. With the recent COVID-19 pandemic necessitating social distancing to avoid infection, interventions such as this one have increasing relevance in the provision of flexible services.

7.
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation ; 12:77, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1817116

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The covid19 pandemic has forced the health system to restructure to prevent contagion of our patients. In this context, the members of the Orthogeriatric Group of the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SCGiG) created a document that collected all the considerations to take into account during the pandemic, based on the current guides and scientific societies, in order to perform a correct follow-up, enhance adherence and prevent future falls. Methods: A bibliographic review was performed, defining the key points in the care of the fractured patient through telemedicine (document is available at http://scgig.cat/docs/gt-orto-covid.pdf). Results: During hospital admission, antiosteoporotic treatment should be started, evaluating indications with the patient and family, to ensure adherence. Diet intake of calcium and vitamin D will be assessed. Discharge report includes evaluation of treatment and monitoring plan, to be useful for liaison nurse, rehabilitator and general practitioner. Six-monthly follow up is recommended for patients with comorbidities, polypharmacy, confusion, fall-risk, or parenteral anti-osteoporotic treatment. With denosumab or teriparatide, annual laboratory tests are recommended, with GFR <20, every six months, at home if possible. Bisphosphonates can be followed by the GP. Zoledronate is not recommended due to delayed administration after surgery, and possibility of transient flu-like simptoms. In the telematic follow-up visit, in patients undergoing zoledronic acid treatment, the new dose can be delayed for 6-12 months, without risk. Consider sequential treatment. Denosumab treatment cannot be delayed, so the patient and family will be trained in self-administration. Support materials from laboratories will be useful to patient and caregivers. Conclusion: Telemedicine is a good strategy for a follow-up, to avoid hospital contact, and starts on hospital admission. Patient and caregivers need access to new technologies and able to understand medical instructions.

8.
Respirology ; 27(SUPPL 1):39, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816632

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Aim: Strategies implemented to minimize infection risk from COVID-19, such as social distancing and community lockdowns, means that policy makers, health professionals and asthma patients are considering alternative approaches of service delivery. Home-based asthma education is one approach that may appeal to these groups, and those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage, where barriers to care such as travel costs can prevent effective management. The efficacy of home-based asthma education to influence health outcomes was last evaluated in a Cochrane systematic review in 2011. Therefore, the aim of this study was to update the evidence to inform policy, clinical care and patient outcomes. Methods: A Cochrane systematic search was undertaken by two-independent researchers using records retrieved from four databases and grey literature (September 2021). Included studies were RCTs of asthma education delivered in the home to children, their caregivers or both. Data extraction, evidence synthesis and reporting of results were conducted in accordance with recommended Cochrane methodology (i.e., Higgins 2021 Cochrane Handbook). Results: Twenty-five studies were included involving 4923 participants predominantly from low socioeconomic and ethnic minority communities. Fourteen studies reported on exacerbations requiring ED visits, with no overall intervention effect. Three studies reported on exacerbations requiring a course of oral corticosteroids (OCS), in which there was a significant reduction in the total number of courses of OCS in the intervention arm compared to the control in one study. Quality of life was reported in eight studies with two able to be meta-analysed (Figure 1), Three reported statistically significant improvements in the intervention arm. Three studies assessed asthma symptom-free days with two producing statistically significant improvements. One showed no evidence of effect. Two studies were metaanalysed identifying no evidence of effect (Figure 2). Conclusion: Substantial diversity across studies/ interventions resulted in an inconsistent evidence base, and the inability to provide meaningful recommendations on home-based education for asthma. (Figure Presented).

9.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):77, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815751

ABSTRACT

Objective: Despite the high prevalence of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children under 5 years of age, there has been limited research about early family support and interventions for this age group. Given that TBI can disrupt parent-child interactions and parent-child interactions are central for child development, we developed an online parenting skills intervention (Gaining Real Life Skills over the Web;GROW) to improve TBI recovery. The online parenting skills program aims to improve caregiver functioning and increase positive parenting behaviors. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of the program. Methods: Parents learned strategies for responsive parenting while integrating stress management and self-care techniques by reviewing online content and videos and practicing parenting skills with therapist feedback over 8 weeks. The online content consisted of 5 core modules with the option for 1 supplemental session. Primary study outcomes were feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of the GROW program to improve caregiver functioning and positive parenting behaviors. Qualitative interviews and satisfaction questionnaires will be analyzed to identify common themes and suggestions across participants. Results: To date, of 63 potentially eligible parents: 23 agreed to participate (36.5%), 19 declined (30.2%), and 21 are currently being recruited (33.3%). Of the 23 who agreed to participate: 10 completed baseline visits (43.5%), 5 are scheduled (21.7%), and 8 are being rescheduled (34.7%). Four parents have completed the program thus far and rated the program as both helpful and enjoyable, finding the coaching to be particularly valuable. Preliminary findings also trend toward an increase in caregiver functioning and positive parenting behaviors. Suggestions for improving the program were oriented towards shortening the program length. Families acknowledged the difficulty in dedicating time to review web content, complete homework, and meet with the therapist weekly. Families with very young children are busy;a challenge made even more difficult amid the influence of COVID and its added stressors. Final pilot data will be presented at the time of the conference. Conclusion: Despite promising feedback about the value of the program, low rates of participation underscore the challenges of engaging parents of very young children. Disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic likely made uptake even lower. Assuming that preliminary evidence for acceptability and efficacy are confirmed, next steps include working with stakeholders to preserve key content while redesigning the program to minimize barriers (e.g., shorten modules) and increase engagement. Efforts to identify and target the unique stressors associated with parenting a very young child will be essential to promote uptake. Ultimately, a larger-scale randomized control trial is needed in order to examine the relative efficacy of the program in relation to a comparison group.

10.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):76-77, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815743

ABSTRACT

Objective: Despite the rapid growth of virtual health services in response to COVID-19, people affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience symptoms that can undermine their ability to access and benefit from such services. This study assessed the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of LoveYourBrain Mindset, a manualized, 6-week yoga, mindfulness, and psychoeducation program delivered online to people with TBI and caregivers. To enhance accessibility, participants choose between two interactive tracks, either a weekly 75-min gentle yoga class or a 45-min group discussion on Zoom. Participants also receive weekly pre-recorded tools by email (1-min psychoeducational videos, 45-min yoga classes, 10-min meditations, 25-min yoga nidra meditations). Methods: LoveYourBrain Foundation recruited prospective participants from October 2020-March 2021 through clinical, advocacy, and social media outreach. People were eligible if they were a TBI survivor or caregiver, age 15 to 70, able to participate in gentle exercise and/or group discussion, and consented for their data to be used for research. Self-reported survey data were collected electronically in eligibility and feedback forms. We assessed feasibility by describing the number of people enrolled, number of programs successfully offered, and mean attendance;usability by examining use of the tools;and acceptability by analyzing satisfaction measures. Results: A total of 62 programs were offered by LoveYourBraintrained Facilitators during the study period. No programs were canceled from low enrollment. Eight hundred and nine eligible people enrolled, including 733 people with TBI and 76 caregivers. Participants were majority white (n = 654, 80.8%), non- Hispanic (n = 690, 85.3%), female (n = 640, 79.1%), educated (college graduate/equivalent or higher) (n = 657, 81.2%), and had a median age of 43 years (range 18-80 years). TBI severity ranged from mild (n = 272, 38.1%), moderate (n = 247, 34.6%), to severe (n = 195, 27.3%). Participants were located mostly in 47 states in the US (n = 601, 74.1%) or 8 Canadian provinces (n = 192, 23.7%). A majority (n = 584, 72.2%) attended ≥1 interactive classes, while 26.8% were 'no-shows' (n = 217) and 1.0% withdrew (n = 8). Mean attendance in the interactive classes was 7 (SD 1) people per program. Most participants (n = 263, 74.0%) completed some tools in 5 or all 6 weeks of their program, most often the videos (n = 256, 72.1%), meditations (n = 142, 40.0%), yoga classes (n = 133, 37.5%), and yoga nidras (n = 105, 29.6%). Participants reported high satisfaction (M = 9.1 out of 10, SD 1.4) and a majority (n = 308, 86.7%) would 'Definitely, yes' recommend it to a friend or family. Conclusion: High attendance, engagement, and satisfaction with LoveYourBrain Mindset suggests that online delivery of yoga, mindfulness, and psychoeducation is feasible and acceptable for people with TBI and caregivers. The program's scalability has implications on expanding access to holistic health services for this marginalized community, yet greater efforts are needed to reach minority groups with disproportionately worse access to care, particularly Black, Indigenous and People of Color.

11.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):121-122, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815742

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a disproportionate disruption to the delivery of in-person services in a multitude of essential and non-essential health service organizations. Management teams have had to seek alternative methods for effective service delivery while meeting appropriate safety precautions. COVID-19 mediated work changes have sparked an increasing concern about allied health worker's well-being and health in the work environment. Vista Centre Brain Injury Services (VCBIS), a Canadian organization committed to providing services to individuals with acquired brain injury, has modified in-person services and transitioned to remote work in response to the pandemic. This study aims to investigate and compare the impact of the pandemic among VCBIS workers. We surveyed individual staff members to assess their physical, psychological and social well-being in their work environment. Additionally, we investigated the staff's perspective on current management strategies and pandemic prospects. Methods: Between March 16th, 2021 and April 2nd, 2021, staff members were surveyed on changes in service due to COVID- 19 and its effect on workflow and well-being. In total, there were ninety-two questions containing a mixture of binary and linear numeric response formats. Fifty-seven questions asked staff members to reflect on their experience since the onset of the pandemic (?Retrospective component?) and thirty-five questions asked about thoughts and feelings about the future of the pandemic as it relates to their employment (?Prospective component?). For descriptive statistics, numeric variables are presented as means with standard deviations and categorical variables are presented with frequencies and percentages. We tested for the differences in responses between genders, age groups, employment status, and program involvement using a student's t-test, or single factor Anova and Tukey-kramer test post hoc. Results: Twenty-five staff members responded to the survey during the response period (32% female, 68% male). Most reported their age in the 30-39 range (28%), followed by the 60 or older, (24%), 18-29 (16%), 40-49 (16%) and 50-59 (16%) age ranges. Statistical analysis is in progress to elucidate significant differences across gender, age groups, employment status and program involvement. Conclusions: The results of this study have important implications for VCBIS service delivery, team management and funding distribution. Due to the long-lasting impact of the pandemic, it is important to consider these findings as VCBIS operates through the pandemic and transitions back to normal services. Preliminary results demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic service changes have impacted staff, suggesting the need for additional support and resources to improve staff work productivity, satisfaction and overall well-being. Given that many health organizations have had to readjust as a result of the pandemic, it is expected that staff outside VCBIS may share similar experiences.

12.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):76, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815739

ABSTRACT

Background: Describe the impact of one-year COVID-19 pandemic on subacute rehabilitation of brain injured patients. In this study we propose an analysis of critical points and possible solutions to carry out intensive rehabilitation while preventing the infection spreading. Methods: We delivered an individualized rehabilitation plan that relies on a multidisciplinary and inter-professional teamwork to develop neuromotor, cognitive, occupational and recreational activities. Our facility is based on a 40-beds ward that admits patients from acute care units. During the COVID- 19 outbreak, a deep reorganization of rehabilitative activities was done to prevent the risk of infection. Infection spreading prevention: education of health-care professionals, patients and care givers to the correct use of personal protective equipment;symptomatic surveillance and periodic screening;rearrangement of care pathways and spaces. Redefinition of rehabilitation activities: reduction of the patients' number in the therapeutic setting;redistribution of the treatments throughout the day;introduction of activities in small groups and specific protocols for robotics. In the early phase, music-therapy, pet-therapy, sports activities, in-hospital school, return-to-work projects were temporary interrupted but later restored. Technology-assisted communications: participation of care givers through video-calls to stimulate interaction and reduce isolation;online periodic team meetings for clinical and rehabilitative updating;virtual home visits to prepare discharge. We maintained caregiver direct participation for patients with disorders of consciousness, severe cognitive-behavioral disorders, pediatric patients;we maintained caregivers' training before discharge. Results: From March 2020 to March 2021, we admitted 166 patients (59 females, 107 males;mean age 58,11 years), 104 of which with severe brain injury. Bed occupancy rate was 93,80%;mean length of stay was 63,73 days. Etiology was hemorrhagic in 53, anoxic in 7, traumatic in 38, neoplastic in 11, ischemic in 45, infectious in 8, neuropathic in 4 cases. Delta-FIM (Functional Independence Measure) was 1,42;delta-BI (Barthel Index) was 33,68;delta-DRS (DisabilityRating Scale) was -2,13;delta-RCS -E (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale-Extended) was 6,56. Only five patients and eight health-care professionals resulted COVID-19 positive during this period. Conclusions: Despite COVID-19 pandemic we provided intensive rehabilitation treatment, without reducing the beds and maintaining a COVID-19 free ward. Bed occupancy rate was similar to that of 2019 (92,13%). We had only 13 positive cases over a year. The complexity and intensity of the treatment was maintained. All activities have been guaranteed although with some adjustments. We developed adaptability and a proactive attitude in the continuous search for new solutions. Despite the efforts, COVID-19 pandemic inevitably impacted on the continuum of care and rehabilitation of brain injuries, especially on complex and fragile cases. Future goals could be further personalization of the treatment and implementation of caregiver participation through technology-assisted communication.

13.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):98, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815738

ABSTRACT

Background: It is known that health of youth and caregivers are dynamically interconnected. Approximately 30% of youth experience persistent post-concussion symptoms (PPCS), which continue beyond four weeks post injury. Prolonged youth recovery is found to affect caregiver's mental health and family functioning. Parental stress also adversely affects youth with PPCS, suggesting that addressing caregiver needs can minimize negative health outcomes among their children. Despite the critical role that caregivers play in concussion recovery, there are no empiricallyvalidated interventions tailored to the specific needs of caregivers of youth with PPCS. Objective: To describe Move&Connect-Caregivers, a virtual group-based intervention for caregivers of youth with PPCS, using the Intervention Mapping (IM) approach. Methods: The six-step IM approach was utilized to guide the development of the novel intervention. First, a focus group with caregivers of youth with PPCS (n = 5) was held to understand their requirements [Needs Assessment step]. The collected data guided the development of program objectives which include psychoeducation, advocacy, and tools to promote positive family and health outcomes [Objectives]. Next, concerns and educational topics suggested by caregivers and supplemented with the theoretical framework of FAB (family-directed approach to brain injury) helped in designing content and methods of the intervention [Design]. Multiple iterative meetings were held with a clinical neuropsychologist and a social worker to develop intervention components and reference material. Further, consultations with stakeholders and a family leader were integrated into the creation process [Production]. The last two steps of IM [Implementation and Evaluation] are planned to assess program feasibility (Summer 2021) and program effectiveness will be established in a future pilot trial. Results: Move&Connect-Caregivers is a virtual group-based intervention that focuses on support strategies to address caregivers' health needs. It is comprised of six sessions titled as follows: Concussion Ripple Effect, School Advocacy, Child's Well-being, Family & You, Parenting is Hard, and Stress & Daily Challenges. This intervention will be delivered weekly by a clinical neuropsychologist and a social worker using the Zoom Health Care platform. Each session is one hour in length, and includes a psychoeducational topic and a group activity followed by discussions and reflections. Handouts and additional resources like websites and flyers will be provided to participants. Conclusion: This novel intervention will shed light on meaningful strategies to improve the well-being of families dealing with concussion. The IM approach is used as a guiding framework to systematically develop an evidence-based intervention for caregivers of youth with PPCS. Virtual interventions are important to enhance accessibility, convenience and social support, especially in current circumstances of COVID-19.

14.
Neuroepidemiology ; 56(SUPPL 1):86, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1813059

ABSTRACT

Objective: The rising burden of stroke in Malaysia has prompted attention on the primary caregivers of stroke survivors. Caregiving burden following stroke is a significant health care concern, however, the assessment of caregiving burden is understudied in Malaysia. This study aims to measure the informal stroke caregivers' burden one month after the patients were discharged from the stroke care. Methods: Acute stroke survivors and their informal caregivers were recruited from three major hospitals in the northeast of Peninsula Malaysia. To minimize the risk of direct contact during the COVID-19 pandemic, the caregivers who fulfilled study criteria were interviewed by phone. Information obtained included caregiver's demographic, self-reported caregiver burden measured using two commonly used tools, namely the Malay version Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) and The Malay version Caregiver Assessment of Function and Upset (CAFU). ZBI consists of 22 questions and CAFU has a 15-item multidimensional measure of dependence. We measured ZBI and CAFU scores twice, one at baseline (post-discharge) and another one month later. The scores were presented as mean and standard deviation (SD). Results: A total of 93 informal caregivers were recruited with 66% of them being female. Generally, the caregiving burden was reduced from discharge (baseline) to one-month post-discharge. The overall mean (SD) scores for ZBI reduced from 23.7 (SD=14.45) to 19.9 (SD=12.67). The overall mean (SD) for CAFU dependency scores reduced from 43.5 (SD=12.65) to 39.4 (SD=15.19), for CAFU upset scores reduced from 5.3 (SD=7.69) to 3.9 (SD=5.47). Between male and female caregiver, the mean ZBI reduced for 13.2% and 23.1% while the CAFU dependency score reduced from 41.7 to 39.4 and 46.4 to 39.4 respectively. Conclusion: The burden felt by the caregivers was initially high but reduced significantly even after 1- month. Any psychosocial support or intervention aimed to ease caregiver burden should be started early.

16.
European Journal of Cancer Care ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1807071

ABSTRACT

Objective Methods Results Conclusion This study aimed to investigate the coronavirus anxiety and caregiving burden of parents of children with cancer during the COVID‐19 outbreak.This descriptive and cross‐sectional study, including 136 parents of children with cancer, was administered through an online survey at a university hospital from 1 to 31 January 2021. Participants completed a questionnaire form, the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale and the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale.This study identified a significant difference in the caregiving burden scores of parents according to whether their relatives had been diagnosed with COVID‐19, whether they were exposed to coronavirus in their environment and whether their children had other illnesses. A significant difference in the coronavirus anxiety scores of parents was observed according to their child's sex and the time elapsed since their child's cancer diagnosis. No correlation was identified between the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale scores and the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale scores.Oncology nurses and other health professionals should be aware of and consider the factors that influence the caregiving burden and coronavirus‐related anxiety experienced by parents of children with cancer during the COVID‐19 outbreak. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of European Journal of Cancer Care is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(SUPPL 1):A1, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1794527

ABSTRACT

The early years of life represent a critical window of opportunity for a child's development, a time when the brain is most sensitive to external influences. Early childhood is not only a period of special sensitivity to risk factors, but also a critical time when the benefits of early interventions are amplified, and the negative effects of risk can be reduced. This is underscored by the evidence from neuroscience1 which emphasizes the importance of nurturing care (adequate health, nutrition, responsive care, opportunities for learning and protection from harm and abuse) to all young children to enable them to reach their full potential. The first 1,000 days of life shape a child's future. Nurturing care plays a vital role in giving children the best possible start in life: the mantra 'Eat, Play, Love'2 summarizes the need for opportunities in the environment of the young child for adequate nutrition, opportunities for play and safety and security. This brain architecture is a critical foundation for all future learning, behaviour and health. And while neural connections continue into adulthood, how these early connections form determine whether later connections have strong or weak foundations. As demonstrated by Heckman,3 the smartest investments in human development are those done earliest in the lifespan, as returns to ECD investments are considerably higher compared to equivalent investments in the later years - primary school, secondary school and after. The healthy development of a baby's brain depends on nurturing care, which benefits children, but it also about the knowledge and resources their families and other caregivers require to provide it. It refers to the enabling conditions created by public policies, programmes and services to ensure children's good health and nutrition, protect them from threats and give them opportunities for early learning, through interactions that are responsive and emotionally supportive. To support the development of their children, parents need time, resources, and services. This is made available through a) enhanced enabling (policy) environments;b) integrated services (for example frontline workers including health, social work, education nutrition);c) knowledge and agency for caregivers and parents such as tools, guidance, masterclasses and information;d) financial support and resources including financial literacy, child benefits, cash transfers and e) amplification of caregivers' voices through social and digital media, parenting voices in community and policy platforms. While the Covid-19 pandemic exacerbated the crisis of care and learning, it has also provided an opportunity to elevate the needs for parenting and family support and care. To continue to promote ECD services and interventions and ensure that every child is enabled to not only survive but thrive we must strengthen formative research models and enhance implementation research on ECD;leverage existing routine touchpoints to elevate the importance of holistic ECD;invest in system strengthening and capacity building of frontline health workers through innovative tools;raise awareness and partners including with parents and caregivers themselves to ensure child health and development;enhance direct support to parents through community engagement initiatives;and, empower policy makers and key stakeholders with the latest evidence and advocate for enhanced investments in ECD and parenting support programmes.

18.
NASN Sch Nurse ; : 1942602X221089047, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794296

ABSTRACT

The response to the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified stress and social isolation for many children, but those children living with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been disproportionately affected. Prior to the pandemic, children with ASD often faced social isolation due to struggles with their social communication and social development. Planning for children with ASD to return to community experiences, including school, appointments, and even recreational activities, will require an understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on the child and their family. As the child and family are working to adjust to changes like new routines, sleep patterns, and sensory issues as a result of the pandemic, the pediatric nursing community should be knowledgeable and prepared to develop creative opportunities to meet the needs of this vulnerable population.

19.
J Intellect Disabil ; : 17446295211062381, 2022 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794083

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the perceived stress levels and coping strategies of caregivers of adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviours during the COVID-19 pandemic in Qatar. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from June 7 to September 7, 2020 for caregivers of adults diagnosed with intellectual disability and challenging behaviours. Perceived stress levels and coping strategies were assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced inventory. Results showed moderate to high perceived stress levels in most caregivers (69%). The most frequent coping strategy was religion, followed by acceptance and active coping. Substance use and self-blame were less frequently used. The study revealed that emotional support, informational support and venting coping strategies were significant predictors of perceived stress levels. Restrictions on physical activity and social mobility caused by pandemic-related lockdowns have placed tremendous pressure on caregivers. Appropriate supportive measures should be implemented for the caregivers.

20.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S40-S44, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792227

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) has usurped human peace and mobility. The confinement of the population and the rising epidemic has disrupted the routine care for non-COVID-19 patients. Telehealth is a growing field, and its application in palliative care is seen as a solution to serve the population in this difficult crisis. METHODOLOGY: A exploratory survey was designed to assess the changes in the hospital-based practice of palliative care in the COVID-19 pandemic and patient/caregiver's perception about the provision of telehealth services to palliative care patients of a tertiary care cancer hospital of eastern India. RESULTS: There was a dramatic reduction in the outpatient clinic footfalls by 51% with teleconsultation. Although there was no change in the number of emergency visits, the inpatient admissions reduced by 44%. Nearly 82% of patient/caregivers gave a positive feedback about telemedicine care provided by the department and mentioned that the service provided them with support and connectedness. Almost 64% of the patients and caregivers reported that the service helped allay the fear and reassured them that there was a someone to support them. As high as 76% of the participants felt that they would prefer teleconsultation in future and were ready to pay for teleconsultations if charges were to be applied in the future. CONCLUSION: Telemedicine is an important tool and an essential service to care for palliative care patients in the community especially when the patient and health-care professionals are separated by a pandemic or natural disaster.

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