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1.
Cytometry Part B - Clinical Cytometry ; 102(2):85-87, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1813493
2.
Genetics in Medicine ; 24(3):S284-S285, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1768097

ABSTRACT

Background: Freeman-Sheldon syndrome [distal arthrogryposis type 2A (OMIM #193700), DA2A, Freeman-Burian syndrome] is a rare autosomal dominant multiple pterygium syndrome caused by alterations in MYH3. The phenotypic features, particularly of the face, are distinct and easily recognizable, and the diagnosis can be confirmed with molecular gene analysis. Fetal ultrasound imaging may provide important diagnostic clues to facilitate the diagnostic process. Informed consent and parental permission were provided by the parents. Case presentation: The infant’s mother presented for a Maternal Fetal Medicine genetic counseling telehealth appointment (due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions) as a G7P2132, 32-year old female who had insulin-dependent diabetes and thrombocytosis. Her partner was a 24-year old male with a history of hearing loss, a V-shaped palate, and a lower lip cleft. Gestational age was 14 4/7 weeks and the indications were: increased nuchal translucency, paternal complex medical history, maternal G6PD heterozygote, and recurrent pregnancy loss. During the genetic counseling session, the following were addressed: 1) Maternal heterozygote status for G6PD indicated that if the fetus was male, there was a 50% chance he would be affected with G6PD-deficiency;2) Increased nuchal translucency on fetal ultrasound (US) with measurement at 98th percentile is associated with an increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities, microdeletion/duplications, and Noonan syndrome. The patient reportedly had low risk cell-free DNA but results were not available to the counselor at the time of consult. The option for additional genetic screening and diagnostic testing was declined;3) Three first trimester pregnancy losses with the father of this baby (FOB) were addressed, and parents deferred chromosome analyses at the time;4) Mother shared FOB’s complex history of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, V-shaped cleft palate, lower lip cleft, and micrognathia. However, father was not present during the telehealth encounter. Mother was counseled regarding the possibility of an autosomal dominant condition with the potential risk to the pregnancy of up to 50%. It was recommended that the FOB have a clinical genetics evaluation, which could potentially provide a specific diagnosis and inform recurrence risk and management guidance. Follow-up MFM genetic counseling telephone visit occurred with the mother at 31 6/7 weeks gestation due to multiple congenital anomalies evident on fetal ultrasound. A 25 week fetal ultrasound revealed hypotelorism and a thickened nuchal translucency. A repeat study at 29 weeks revealed a V-shaped palate with a possible cleft, micrognathia, and midline mandibular cleft. FOB’s history was revisited. It was determined that he had 3 previous “no shows” to Genetics clinic appointments and did not pursue evaluation after the last counseling appointment. Again, it was emphasized that in order to best make a diagnosis for the family, an affected person would need to undergo a thorough evaluation, including medical and family history review, physical examination, and any indicated genetic testing. The parents were comfortable with the likelihood that the baby had the same condition as the father, but variable expressivity and broad range pf phenotypic presentation were explained. Recommendations for postnatal evaluation of the infant and pertinent genetic testing were provided. Consultative Genetics evaluation of the infant at 2 days of age revealed a short, broad forehead with supraorbital fullness leading to a horizontal brow indentation;mask-like facial appearance;hypotelorism;very deep set eyes with blepharophimosis;deep, creased nasal bridge;small, upturned nose with hypoplastic alae and narrow nares;microstomia with pursed lips;glossoptosis;micrognathia;2 deep vertical chin creases;short neck with excess nuchal skin;inverted and wide spaced nipples;clenched hands with 5th digits overlying 4th and 2nd overlying 3rd, bilaterally;bilateral vertical talus;2nd toes longer and overlying rd toes;clinodactyly of 4th and 5th toes bilaterally;and deep gluteal crease with no visible sinus. There were no evident contractures. The father has a complex history with no medical assessments prior to age 18. He reported that he did “not look like anyone else” in his family. He has a diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder, a submucous cleft, vision issues, hearing loss necessitating a hearing aid on the left, and a history of cholesteatomas and of mastoidectomy. On brief examination, he had a mask-like face, blepharophimosis, left microphthalmia, left esotropia, narrowing of his midface, deep vertical crease on the mandibular region, microstomia, broad great toes, single flexor creases on the thumbs, and contracture of right thumb. Maxillofacial CT of the infant revealed hypoplastic mandibular body, ramus, and condyles bilaterally with micrognathia and retrognathia;hypoplastic maxilla bilaterally;and enophthalmos with retracted appearance of globes in the bony orbits bilaterally. Multiple facial bone abnormalities were seen, including microsomia, micrognathia, retrognathia, orbital hypotelorism and enophthalmos Genetic testing was performed via a custom Whole Exome Slice at GeneDx laboratories and included the MYH3 and TNNI2 genes. Results revealed a heterozygous pathogenic change in MYH3 (c.2015 G>A;p. R6724) consistent with the diagnosis of Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Conclusion: The presentation of “midline mandibular cleft” on fetal ultrasound was the most specific prenatal finding. This is a very rare fetal finding. Thus, it should prompt further evaluation to assess for true clefting versus ridging or creasing. Additionally, targeted assessment for other findings or clinical clues for Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, such as contractures, “windmill vane” hand, and mouth size, could aid in the differential diagnosis considerations and the diagnostic process. Admittedly, these are position and quality dependent, and are challenging to assess even in ideal situations. The phenotype of the father was immediately recognizable. However, due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, prior to the infant’s birth, only telehealth visits were conducted and the father’s participation was by telephone. This limited the ability to narrow the differential diagnosis without visualization of his distinct phenotypic features. Finally, missed opportunities to diagnose the father prior to this pregnancy occurred. Many clinics send “no show” letters to referring providers and patients, as we do. Emphasizing the importance of diagnosis prior to pregnancy for individuals concerned about having a genetic disorder should be considered as part of the information shared in these letters.

3.
Leukemia and Lymphoma ; 62(SUPPL 1):S40-S42, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1747051

ABSTRACT

Introduction: TG-1701 is a selective, covalent BTK inhibitor administered once daily (QD). Both the 'U2' combination (anti-CD20 mAb ublituximab+the PI3Kd-CK1e inhibitor umbralisib) and BTK inhibitors are highly efficacious in treatment- naïve (TN) and relapsed/refractory (R/R) CLL, each having previously demonstrated superiority over standard chemoimmunotherapy. Here, we report results for patients treated with TG-1701 alone or in combination with U2 from an ongoing Phase 1 study, with a focus on patients with CLL. Methods: Patients with R/R CLL and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma were enrolled in an ongoing Phase 1 study initially evaluating dose escalation (DE) of oral TG-1701 QD continuously administered in 28-day cycles (100, 200, 300, and 400 mg). After characterizing the safety profile of TG-1701 monotherapy, we implemented a parallel DE arm of TG-1701+U2. Select dose levels of TG-1701 monotherapy were also expanded. All patients were treated until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or investigator/patient decision to withdraw. Safety was evaluated in all treated patients, and efficacy was evaluated in all treated patients with CLL who had at least 1 post-baseline assessment. Results: As of 30 April 2021, 125 patients were treated with TG-1701, 49 of whom had CLL. Enrollment was: 25 patients in the monotherapy DE arm (6 with CLL), 61 in the 200-mg disease-specific cohorts (20 CLL [5 TN], 21 mantle cell lymphoma [MCL, 4 TN], 20 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia [WM, 8 TN]), 20 in the 300-mg CLL cohort (4 TN), and 19 in the 1701+U2 DE arm (3 with CLL). Patients with MCL or WM in the 200-mg disease-specific cohorts were excluded from this analysis. The median # of prior therapies among CLL patients was 1 (range, 0-5) and all patients were BTKi-naïve. TG-1701 was well-tolerated and the maximum tolerated dose for monotherapy was not reached up to 400mg (near 100% saturation of the BTK at all dose levels studied). In the DE arms, the most common all-causality treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAE) were constipation (32%), increased ALT (28%), bruising (28%), and upper respiratory tract infection (28% of patients) with TG-1701 monotherapy;diarrhea (53%) and bruising (42%) with TG-1701+U2. Grade 3/4 AEs were limited. In the CLL-specific cohorts, the most common TEAE was increased ALT/AST (all grades, 17.5%;grade 3, 2.5%;grade ≥4, none), followed by diarrhea (all grades, 12.5%;grade ≥3, none), and COVID-19 (all grades, 12.5%;grade 3-4, none;grade 5, 7.5%). There were no cases of atrial fibrillation, major bleeding, or ventricular tachyarrhythmia in the CLL cohorts at a median follow-up of 10.5 months. TEAEs leading to TG-1701 dose reduction occurred in 7.5% of patients. TEAEs leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in 7.5% of patients (all COVID-19). At the data cut-off, 48 patients with CLL were evaluable for response, including nine in DE. ORR was 95.6% for TG-1701 monotherapy (all PR/PR-L) and 100% for TG-1701+U2 (all PR). The median duration of response has not been reached in either cohort. The best change from baseline in tumor burden in patients with CLL is presented in Figure 1, and treatment exposure and response duration data are presented in Figure 2 below. In patients with anemia and thrombocytopenia at baseline, sustained improvement in hematologic variables was observed in the 200- and 300-mg cohorts. Lymphocytosis was observed in 70% of the monotherapy patients, with a resolution to normal or <50% of baseline in 57.1%. Consistent response rates were observed across all subgroups, including age and high-risk genomic features, such as del17p/TP53, unmutated immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (IGHV), and complex karyotype (defined as three or more cytogenetic abnormalities). Time to event data will be reported at the time of presentation. Conclusions: TG-1701 exhibits an encouraging safety and efficacy profile in patients with CLL, with promising activity and a manageable tolerability profile as monotherapy and in combination with U2 (Figure 1). Future registration trials ar being planned in CLL with TG-1701. Recruitment to this study (NCT03671590) continues.

4.
Molecular Genetics and Metabolism ; 132:S40, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735090

ABSTRACT

Cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosome 16 are found in 5– 8% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). These are typically a pericentric inversion inv(16)(p13.1q22) or a translocation, t(16;16)(p13.1;q22), involving the MYH11 and CBFB genes localized to chromosome 16p13.1 and 16q22, respectively. In addition, less common rearrangements include deletion of the long arm of chromosome 16, del(16) (q22), and cryptic insertions involving the MYH11 and the CBFB genes with otherwise normal karyotypes. In this report, we present the first AML case with a new translocation involving the CBFB gene. The more common CBFB - MYH11 fusion product resulting from the inversion and/or translocation of chromosome(s) 16 leads to an AML with monocytic and granulocytic differentiation and abnormal eosinophil component with large, purple to violet color eosinophilic granules. This entity typically corresponds to the adult AML-M4Eo in French-American- British (FAB) Classification and now called AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(16;16)(p13.1;q22);CBFB-MYH1 in the new 2017 WHO Classification. Patients may present with myeloid sarcoma at initial diagnosis or at relapse. We present a case of an 80-year-old male with a history of prostate cancer post radiotherapy who was referred for COVID-19 testing. A complete blood count with differential revealed neutropenia and a macrocytic anemia. A bone marrow biopsy and a bone marrow aspirate confirmed a diagnosis of AML with 33% blasts including myeloblasts and promonocytes. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a break-apart probe for CBFB showed an abnormal hybridization pattern consistent with rearrangement of CBFB in 66% of nuclei. Chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal karyotype with two related clones: 47,XY, t(10;16)(p13;q22),+22[4]/48,idem,+8[16]. Sequential GTG-FISH confirmed that the 3’ region of CBFB was translocated to 10p13 in the t(10;16) and the 5’ region remained on 16q. Based on the karyotype, the patient’s bone barrow exhibits clonal evolution having acquired additional chromosome abnormalities (trisomy 22 and trisomy 8). Molecular studies by next generation sequencing showed NRAS p.Gln61Lys mutation with a VAF of 11.21%. No genomic alterations were detected in KIT, KRAS or FLT3 genes. AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(16;16)(p13.1;q22) is associated with a high rate of complete remission and favorable overall survival when treated with intensive consolidation therapy. However, their prognostic advantage may be affected by additional cytogenetic abnormalities and/or other gene mutations. Specifically, trisomy 22, is a frequent abnormality additional to inv(16) detected as a secondary finding which has been associated with an improved outcome when compared to the prognosis associated with inv(16) alone. Furthermore, KIT (in 30–40%), FLT3 (in 14%), NRAS (in 45%) and KRAS (in 13%) mutations are common in this AML type. The prognostic implications of KIT mutation (especially involving exon 8) do not appear to be significantly poor prognostic compared to other AML types. On the other hand FLT3-TKD mutations and trisomy 8 are associated with a worse outcome. The patient is currently receiving Vidaza 75 mg/m2, days 1–7 of a 28 days cycle with Venetoclax mg daily of a 28-day cycle and his clinical prognosis is currently unclear. Further analysis by DNA sequencing may help to characterize the molecular nature of the fusion gene product resulting from the novel t(10;16)(p13;q22). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an AML patient with translocation t(10;16)(p13;q22) involving the CBFB gene. Given the rarity and lack of additional information regarding the effects of this abnormality, the prognosis and survival cannot be predicted.

5.
Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617059

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) tends to be milder in children, but severe cases have been reported. We described a case report of a toddler admitted to our department with additional findings, highlighting the importance of assessing the patient as a whole. Case Presentation: A previously healthy, 15-month-year-old girl presented with fever and dry cough for 10 days, respiratory distress and PCR SARS-CoV-2 was positive. At admission, she presented with hypoxemia (SpO2 89-90% in room air), global retraction and bilateral bronchospasm. She was treated with bronchodilators, methylprednisolone, remdesivir and also amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Her complete blood count revealed leucocytosis 16,160x109/L, 41% lymphocytes, C-reactive protein 57,9 mg/L, procalcitonin 0,13 ng/mL, sedimentation rate 44 mm/h, ferritin 218,4 ng/mL. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed bilateral peripheral areas of ground glass, coexisting consolidation areas at inferior lobes but also revealed a 6 cm supra-renal mass. Abdominal ultrasound and CT confirmed an heterogeneous right supra-renal gland mass of 5,5cm along the greatest diameter with diffuse calcifications, evolving the inferior vena cava and the renal vascular pedicle, no signs of liver, bone, cutaneous or ganglionic metastization. These features were suggestive of neuroblastoma in stage L2. Vanillylmandelic acid, normetanephrine/creatinine ratio and metanephrine/creatinine ratio were elevated. The metaiodobenzylguanidine (Mibg) scan showed a localized disease. The total excision of the tumour mass was performed, and the histology confirmed neuroblastoma with no N-myc oncogene amplification, nor other bad prognosis chromosomal abnormalities. She is currently under oncological surveillance, with no signs of recurrence. Learning Points Discussion: Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour of childhood. It is known for its broad spectrum of clinical behaviour and outcome. In this case, although this toddler was admitted due to COVID-19 pneumonia, it allowed to identify a localized tumour, perform excision and due to the favourable biology tumour, she has a very good chances of being cured and free of disease.

6.
Blood ; 138:2630, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582444

ABSTRACT

Background: Currently, asymptomatic patients with CLL/SLL are observed without treatment until development of symptoms or cytopenias. Historically, early intervention studies in patients with CLL/SLL with non-specific chemoimmunotherapy agents have not resulted in an overall survival (OS) benefit and have resulted in toxicity. The introduction of targeted therapies, such as venetoclax (an oral BCL2 inhibitor;V) and obinutuzumab (an intravenous anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody;O), have provided tolerable/efficacious options for patients with CLL. In the CLL14 study, symptomatic patients with CLL receiving frontline therapy with VO had longer progression-free survival (PFS) and deeper remissions [more undetectable minimal residual disease (uMRD)] compared with those receiving chlorambucil and O (Fischer 2019). The CLL-International Prognostic Index (CLL-IPI;Table 1) is a validated prognostic model to predict which patients are at highest risk of a shorter time to first therapy and shorter OS. A score of ≥4 is considered high-risk on this scale. We aim to use VO as early intervention in asymptomatic, high-risk CLL patients, assessed by CLL-IPI, to potentially improve OS and thus alter the natural history of the disease. Methods: On 12/14/20, we activated the S1925 study (NCT#04269902 ) for adult patients with CLL or SLL, who were diagnosed within 12 months of enrollment. Eligible patients have a CLL-IPI score ≥4 (Table 1) or complex cytogenetics (≥3 cytogenetic abnormalities) and do not meet any criteria for initiation of treatment by the International Working Group for CLL (IWCLL;Hallek 2018) guidelines. Enrolled patients are randomized in a 2:1 manner to early versus delayed (at the time IWCLL indication for treatment is met) therapy with VO (Figure 1). VO is administered as previously described (Fischer 2019). The primary endpoint is OS. We hypothesize that early intervention with VO will improve the rate of 6-year OS from 60% to 80%. This design requires 222 eligible patients for 88% power (2-sided a=0.05) for the primary comparison. To allow for 10% ineligibility, we will enroll 247 patients. Estimated accrual time is 4 years. Secondary endpoints include: rates of response, PFS, and relapse-free survival;safety;time to second CLL-directed therapy;and quality of life (assessed by FACT-Leukemia). As COVID19 is an infection with particularly high morbidity and mortality in patients with CLL, incidence of this infection and complications including death will be recorded and compared between patients followed on the early versus delayed intervention arms. The primary translational objective is to evaluate the prognostic association between OS and peripheral blood MRD status at 15 months after treatment initiation by flow cytometry. Secondary translational objectives include describing the association of other clinical outcomes, baseline prognostic factors, and IWCLL-defined response with MRD status at multiple timepoints. Current Status: At the time of submission, 7 patients have been registered and randomized per protocol. Accrual is ongoing. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Stephens: Adaptive: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;TG Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Epizyme: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Beigene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Innate Pharma: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AstraZeneca: Consultancy;CSL Behring: Consultancy;Celgene: Consultancy;Novartis: Research Funding;Abbvie: Consultancy;JUNO: Research Funding;Arqule: Research Funding;Mingsight: Research Funding;Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Moseley: BioSight Ltd: Consultancy. Hill: AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Gentenech: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Beigene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria;Kite, Gilead Company: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel Support, Research Funding;Karyopharm: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;AstraZenica: Consultancy, Honoraria;Celgene (BMS): Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Epizyme: Consultancy, Honoraria;Incyte/Morphysis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding. Pagel: Pharmacyclics/AbbVie: Consultancy;Actinium Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy;Incyte/MorphoSys: Consultancy;BeiGene: Consultancy;Epizyme: Consultancy;Kite, a Gilead Company: Consultancy;AstraZeneca: Consultancy;Gilead: Consultancy;MEI Pharma: Consultancy. Shadman: Mustang Bio, Celgene, Bristol Myers Squibb, Pharmacyclics, Gilead, Genentech, Abbvie, TG Therapeutics, Beigene, AstraZeneca, Sunesis, Atara Biotherapeutics, GenMab: Research Funding;Abbvie, Genentech, AstraZeneca, Sound Biologics, Pharmacyclics, Beigene, Bristol Myers Squibb, Morphosys, TG Therapeutics, Innate Pharma, Kite Pharma, Adaptive Biotechnologies, Epizyme, Eli Lilly, Adaptimmune, Mustang Bio and Atara Biotherapeutics: Consultancy. Danilov: Genentech: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Takeda Oncology: Research Funding;TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Research Funding;Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria;Beigene: Consultancy, Honoraria;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy, Honoraria;Gilead Sciences: Research Funding;Bristol-Meyers-Squibb: Honoraria, Research Funding;Rigel Pharm: Honoraria;Bayer Oncology: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;SecuraBio: Research Funding;Astra Zeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding. Mato: Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company: Consultancy, Research Funding;DTRM BioPharma: Consultancy, Research Funding;Acerta/AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Research Funding;Sunesis: Consultancy, Research Funding;BeiGene: Consultancy, Research Funding;Johnson and Johnson: Consultancy, Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Research Funding;Nurix: Research Funding;Genmab: Research Funding;LOXO: Consultancy, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Consultancy;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Consultancy, Research Funding;MSKCC: Current Employment;TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: DSMB, Research Funding. Brander: Juno Therapeutics/Celgene/Bristol Myers Squibb: Research Funding;Pfizer: Consultancy, Other: Biosimilars outcomes research panel;TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Research Funding;Novartis: Research Funding;ArQule/Merck: Consultancy;Verastem: Consultancy;BeiGene: Research Funding;ArQule: Research Funding;NCCN: Other: panel member;AstraZeneca: Research Funding;Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company: Consultancy, Research Funding;LOXO: Research Funding;Ascentage: Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding;DTRM: Research Funding;MEI Pharma: Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Other: informCLL registry steering committee, Research Funding. Coutre: Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Beigene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Data Safety Monitoring Committee, Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Acerta: Other: Data Safety Monitoring Committee, Research Funding. O'Brien: Kite, Regeneron, Acerta, Caribou, Gilead, Pharmacyclics, TG Therapeutics, Pfizer, Sunesis: Research Funding;Amgen, Astellas, Celgene, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen Oncology, Aptose Biosciences Inc., Vaniam Group LLC, AbbVie, Alexion, Verastem, Juno Therapeutics, Vida Ventures, Autolus, Johnson and Johnson, Merck, Bristol Myers Squibb, NOVA Research Company, El Lill: Consultancy. Erba: AbbVie Inc;Agios Pharmaceuticals Inc;Bristol Myers Squibb;Celgene, a Bristol Myers Squibb company;Incyte Corporation;Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc;Novartis: Speakers Bureau;AbbVie Inc: Other: Independent review committee;AbbVie Inc;Agios Pharmaceuticals Inc;ALX Oncology;Amgen Inc;Daiichi Sankyo Inc;FORMA Therapeutics;Forty Seven Inc;Gilead Sciences Inc;GlycoMimetics Inc;ImmunoGen Inc;Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc;MacroGenics Inc;Novartis;PTC Therapeutics: Research Funding;AbbVie Inc;Agios Pharmaceuticals Inc;Astellas;Bristol Myers Squibb;Celgene, a Bristol Myers Squibb company;Daiichi Sankyo Inc;Genentech, a member of the Roche Group;GlycoMimetics Inc;Incyte Corporation;Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc;Kura Oncology;Nov: Other: Advisory Committee. OffLabel Disclosure: The trial studies early intervention with venetoclax and obinutuzumab in patients with CLL/SLL who are asymptomatic and observation would be standardly recommended.

7.
Blood ; 138:2291, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582310

ABSTRACT

Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted non-urgent and preventive medical care. During the early peak of the pandemic, an estimated 41% of US adults delayed or avoided medical care (Czeisler et al, CDC, 2020). While there were documented declines in the number of emergency department visits for myocardial infarction, stroke and hyperglycemia, similar data is not available related to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (Lange et al, CDC, 2020). A delay in the diagnosis of AML could lead to presentation when patients are less able to withstand chemotherapy or have a higher disease burden which could compromise overall survival (OS). In this retrospective analysis, we aim to elucidate if there was a difference in clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular presentations and if there was an effect on early mortality as determined by overall survival at 1 and 6 months. Methods We compared the clinical, cytogenetic, and baseline molecular genetics of consecutive adult patients diagnosed with de novo AML at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's (DFCI/BWH) Hospital from March 23, 2020, the date of the Massachusetts COVID State of Emergency, to August 23, 2020 to a historical cohort of similar patients between presenting between March 23, 2017 and August 23, 2020. Data was obtained from the Hematological Malignancy Data Repository and via review of the medical record. Patients were excluded from this cohort if they were diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia, had known antecedent myeloid malignancy, or if they did not have DFCI/BWH 96-gene next-generation sequencing panel (RHP) performed at the time of diagnosis. Baseline clinical, laboratory, cytogenetic, and molecular characteristics and outcomes were compared between the pre-pandemic and pandemic cohorts using chi-squared, Fisher's exact, and Wilcoxon rank sum analyses (where appropriate) at a significance of p<0.05. Results Thirty-eight AML patients presented during the COVID-19 pandemic (PAN) and 308 in the pre-pandemic (PREPAN) period. There was no statistically significant difference in the monthly rate of new patients presenting in PREPAN and PAN cohorts (8 vs. 6 new patients/month, p=0.73). The median age at presentation (64 PREPAN vs. 65 PAN, p=0.77), sex, and therapeutic approach (intensive, non-intensive, supportive care, other) were not statistically different between cohorts. Presenting white blood cell count, platelet count, and fibrinogen were not different between cohorts, while hematocrit was significantly lower in the PAN cohort (23.8% vs. 26.0%, p=0.001). There was a trend for a higher median blast percentage (28.5% vs. 13%, p=0.09) in the PAN cohort. There were no differences between the cohorts in the median number of cytogenetic abnormalities, nor in the incidence of complex karyotype, (25.3% vs. 23.7%) across PREPAN and PAN respectively. There were also no significant differences in the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) risk classification scores across the PREPAN and PAN time periods, with 57.8% vs. 52.6% of total patients presenting with adverse risk disease respectively. When specific mutations of TP53, NPM1, and FLT3 were evaluated, only FLT3 demonstrated a statistical difference with a higher proportion in the pandemic group (p=0.04). OS at 1-month (97.4% and 93.2%, p=0.15) and 6-months (71.1% and 75.0%, p-0.87) were not statistically different in the PREPAN and PAN cohorts, respectively. Conclusion These data represent a novel analysis of the presenting clinical, cytogenetic and molecular characteristics of de novo AML during the COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast to other diseases, we did not see fewer de novo AML presentations during the peak of the COVID pandemic. While the reasons are unknown and require validation in large cohorts, the symptoms of leukemia including symptomatic anemia (low hematocrit) and higher WBC and blast count possibly driven by FLT3 mutations may drive patients to seek emergent clinical evaluation despite COVID pandemic barriers. The lack of difference in cytogenetic or other prognostic entities may demonstrate a lack of ymptom correlation causing patients to present for care. The higher incidence of FLT3 mutations and lower hematocrit could reflect more symptomatic presentation of AML during the COVID pandemic. Since these differences may be a surrogate for a higher disease burden, it will be important to compare outcomes at longer time points. [Formula presented] Disclosures: DeAngelo: Pfizer: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy, Research Funding;Jazz: Consultancy;Incyte: Consultancy;Forty-Seven: Consultancy;Autolus: Consultancy;Amgen: Consultancy;Agios: Consultancy;Takeda: Consultancy;Glycomimetrics: Research Funding;Blueprint: Research Funding;Abbvie: Research Funding;Servier: Consultancy. Stone: Bristol Meyers Squibb: Consultancy;Astellas: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BerGen Bio: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Boston Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy;Innate: Consultancy;Foghorn Therapeutics: Consultancy;Gemoab: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Glaxo Smith Kline: Consultancy;Celgene: Consultancy;Elevate Bio: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;OncoNova: Consultancy;Syntrix/ACI: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Syndax: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Janssen: Consultancy;Agios: Consultancy, Research Funding;Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Aprea: Consultancy;Arog: Consultancy, Research Funding;Jazz: Consultancy;Macrogenics: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy, Research Funding;Actinium: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Abbvie: Consultancy;Syros: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda: Consultancy. Garcia: AstraZeneca: Research Funding;Prelude: Research Funding;Pfizer: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Astellas: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AbbVie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Winer: Abbvie: Consultancy;Takeda: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy.

8.
Blood ; 138:3943, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582283

ABSTRACT

Background: Newly drugs access for MM treatment still a challenge in some countries. One of the most available inductions for TE NDMM patients (pts) worldwide is cyclophosphamide (C), thalidomide (T) and dexamethasone (d)-(CTd). Dara the first anti- CD38, had been combined with VCd, VTd and VRd and markedly increased the depth and duration of the response. We hypothesized that Dara and CTd combination could be safe and allow deeper activity as an alternative protocol. Aims: The aims of this analysis were to evaluate Progression Free Survival (PFS) of Dara-CTd treatment and minimal residual disease (MRD) after one year of Dara maintenance. Primary endpoint of the study was to evaluate the VGPR after two consolidation cycles post-autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Methods: This is a phase II, open-label single-center clinical trial. The main inclusion criteria were: TE NDMM, creatinine clearance > 30 ml/min, normal cardiac, renal and liver function and the Easter Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status = 0 - 2. The protocol was Dara-CTd for up to four 28-day induction cycles: C-500mg oral (PO) on days 1,8 and 15, T at 100-200mg PO on days 1 to 28, (d) at 40mg PO on days 1,8,15 and 22 and Dara at 16mg/Kg/dose intravenous (IV) on days 1,8,15 and 22 during cycles 1 - 2 and every other week in cycles 3 - 4, followed by ASCT. All pts received up to four 28-day consolidation cycles that was started at D+30 after ASCT: Dara at 16mg/Kg and (d) at 40mg every other week, associated with T at 100mg PO on days 1 - 28. Dara at 16mg/Kg was used monthly as maintenance until progression or limiting toxicity. G-CSF was used for stem cell (SC) mobilization and plerixafor had been allowed whenever the pts need. The MRD was evaluated by next-generation flow (NGF) based and PET-CT was performed when the patient obtained NGF negativity or finished consolidation. PFS outcome was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. All pts received antiviral, anti-pneumocystis and anti-thrombotic prophylaxis. Data cut-off was June 15, 2021. Results: The first pts was enrolled in November 2018. A total of 24 pts were included, the median age being 60 (range 37- 67 years), 23 (92%) were non-white, 5 (21%) had an R-ISS = 1, 12 (54%) had an R-ISS = 2 and 4 (16%), an R-ISS = 3. Six (25%) pts had high-risk chromosomal abnormalities [del17p, t(4;14) or t(14;16)]. To date, all pts have completed induction, 20 have received transplant and 17 have completed D+90 post-transplant assessment. No SC mobilization failure was observed, and six (30%) pts needed plerixafor use. By ITT analysis after a median follow up of 20 months the PFS at 12 and 18 months was 86%. No PFS difference was observed between different subgroups. Regarding response rates, after the end of induction (cycle 4), 19 (90%) of the pts obtained > PR and 8 (38%) obtained >VGPR, including three MRD negativity by NGF. 17 pts have completed two consolidation cycles after transplant and 94% obtained > VGPR as best response, 13 (76%) obtained MRD negativity by NGF and 10 (58%) had negative PET-CT. Seven (41%) pts had both flow and PET-CT negativity. Six pts completed one year of maintenance and five of them (83%) still MRD negativity by NGF. Four pts died from infection, two of them related with covid infection (one before transplant and one during maintenance). Another case post-transplant, considered not related to the investigational agent and one after consolidation, related to the investigational agent. Two pts have discontinued treatment due to progression - 1 before ASCT e 1 during maintenance. The most common adverse events (AEs) grades 3 and 4 were neutropenia (n = 12), infusion reaction (n = 7), neuropathy (n = 6), lymphopenia (n = 4), infection (n = 3), hypertension (n = 1) and rash (n = 1). Summary/Conclusion: The Daratumumab - CTd protocol is an active regimen capable of producing deep and sustainable responses and improve the PFS of NDMM TE pts with a favorable safety profile. Clinical trial information: NCT03792620. Disclosures: De Queiroz Crusoe: Janssen: Research Fund ng. Hungria: Sanofi: Honoraria, Other: Support for attending meetings/travel;Takeda: Honoraria;Abbvie: Honoraria;Amgen, BMS, Celgene, Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Support for attending meetings/travel.

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