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1.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199517

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveWe investigated the effects of COVID-19 fear on negative moods among college students, and assessed the efficacy of physical exercise behavior as a moderator variable. MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study. Students from three colleges and universities in Shangqiu City, Henan Province and Yangzhou City, Jiangsu Province were enrolled in this study, which was performed during the COVID-19 pandemic using an online questionnaire. A total of 3,133 college students completed the questionnaire. Measurement tools included the COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S), Depression-Anxiety-Stress Self-Rating Scale (DASS), and the Physical Activity Behavior Scale (PARS-3). ResultsDuring the COVID-19 pandemic, the rates of depression, anxiety, and stressful negative moods among college students were 35.5, 65.5, and 10.95%, respectively;there was a positive correlation between COVID-19 fear and negative moods among college students (r = 0.479, p < 0.001), which was negatively correlated with physical exercise behavior (r = -0.4, p < 0.001);the regulating effects of physical exercise behavior were significant (Delta R2 = 0.04, p < 0.001). ConclusionThe rate of negative moods among college students is high, and the fear for COVID-19 is one of the key factors that lead to negative moods. Physical exercise can modulate the impact of COVID-19 fear among college students on negative moods. Studies should elucidate on mental health issues among different populations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199511

ABSTRACT

ObjectRepeated quarantine policies over the past 3 years have led to poor psychological consequences for the public. Previous studies have proved that the quarantine policy leaves individuals vulnerable to anxiety, depression, and insomnia, especially among college students. This study aims to explore whether psychological problems during isolation continue with the release of isolation. MethodsOverall, 2,787 college students both answered a web-based survey during and after the closure management was lifted. The Patient Health Questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Youth Self-rating Insomnia Scale were measured. The cross-lagged path model was used to explore the influence of psychological impact during isolation on the individual after the release. ResultsWe found that anxiety and sleep disturbance levels alleviated significantly after quarantine, except for depression. As expected, a bidirectional relationship exists between anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Moreover, depression and sleep disturbance can predict post quarantine depression, sleep disturbance, and anxiety, yet anxiety cannot predict sleep disturbance afterward. ConclusionTimely and effective intervention for anxiety, depression, and insomnia during isolation is essential for individuals to repair themselves quickly after the release.

3.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199196

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe present study investigated the role of dispositional hope as a potential protective factor moderator in the relationship between adult ADHD symptoms, media use/smart phone addiction and wellbeing during the period of isolation because of the COVID-19 pandemic among students in Romania. MethodsA sample of 333 college students (86.8% female and 13.2% male) between the age of 18 and 47 with a mean of 20.6 years old from West University of Timisoara completed online surveys. Mediation and moderation analyses were performed to assess the associations among the variables. ResultsResults confirmed the negative associations of both adult ADHD and smartphone addiction with overall wellbeing. The smartphone addiction/ wellbeing association was moderated by dispositional hopefulness, such that high hopefulness served as a protective factor [b = -0.008, 95% percentile CI (-0.0134;-0.0012)]. DiscussionImplications for the educational environment are discussed.

4.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1):96, 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2196201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The years people spend attending university or college are often filled with transition and life change. Younger students often move into their adult identity by working through challenges and encountering new social experiences. These transitions and stresses have been impacted significantly by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has led to dramatic change in the post-secondary experience, particularly in the pandemic's early months when colleges and universities were closed to in person teaching. The goal of this study was to identify how COVID-19 has specifically impacted the postsecondary student population in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. METHODS: The Cost of COVID is a mixed methods study exploring the social and emotional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, with a focus on families, youth, and urban Indigenous People. The present analysis was completed using a subset of qualitative data including Spryng.io micronarrative stories from students in college and university, as well as in-depth interviews from service providers providing services to students. A double-coded phenomenological approach was used to collect and analyze data to explore and identify themes expressed by postsecondary students and service providers who worked with postsecondary students. RESULTS: Twenty-six micronarratives and seven in-depth interviews were identified that were specifically relevant to the post-secondary student experience. From this data, five prominent themes arose. Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the use of technology was important to the post secondary experience. The pandemic has substantial educational impact on students, in what they chose to learn, how it was taught, and experiences to which they were exposed. Health and wellbeing, physical, psychological and emotional, were impacted. Significant impacts were felt on family, community, and connectedness aspects. Finally, the pandemic had important financial impacts on students which affected their learning and their experience of the pandemic. Impacts did differ for Indigenous students, with many of the traditional cultural supports and benefits of spaces of higher education no longer being available. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights important impacts of the pandemic on students of higher education that may have significant individual and societal implications going forward. Both postsecondary institutions and society at large need to attend to these impacts, in order to preserve the wellbeing of graduates, the Canadian labor market, and to ensure that the pandemic does not further exacerbate existing inequalities in post-secondary education in Canada.

5.
Clinical Psychological Science ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2195753

ABSTRACT

The current study used device-logged screen-time records to measure week-to-week within-person associations between stress and smartphone use in undergraduate students (N = 187;mean age = 20.1 years). The study was conducted during fall 2020 and focused on differences across types of app used and whether accumulated screen use each week predicted end-of-week mood states. Participants uploaded weekly screenshots from their iPhone "Screen Time” settings display and completed surveys measuring stress, mood, and COVID-19 experiences. Results of multilevel models showed no week-to-week change in smartphone hours of use or device pickups. Higher stress levels were not concurrently associated with heavier smartphone use, either overall or by type of app. Heavier smartphone use in a given week did not predict end-of-week mood states, but students who tended to spend more time on their phones in general reported slightly worse moods—a between-persons effect potentially reflecting deficits in well-being that are present in students' off-line lives as well. Our findings contribute to a growing scholarly consensus that time spent on smartphones tells us little about young people's well-being. © The Author(s) 2023.

6.
Eval Health Prof ; : 1632787221147619, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2194845

ABSTRACT

We investigated the prevalence of anxiety and its associated risk factors among college students who self-isolated for 30 days during the emergence of the Omicron variant in China. We sampled college students specializing in four academic majors by cluster sampling and conducted questionnaires separately on days 1, 10, 20, and 30 after self-isolation. Anxiety was assessed using the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). An odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the strength of associations. A total of 10231 college students responded to the questionnaire 4 times. More students reported experiencing anxiety as the period of self-isolation approached 30 days. Among the students from four different major disciplines, medical students reported the highest rate of anxiety after 30 days of self-isolation, whereas humanities students exhibited the lowest rate of anxiety. Factor analysis indicated that the main reason for anxiety among all participating students was a delay in course completion. For engineering and medical students, there was an association between anxiety and research project delay. This study reveals the level of anxiety associated with COVID-19 pandemic-related self-isolation in college students and finds that it was aggravated by long-term isolation.

7.
2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022 ; 2022-October, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2191752

ABSTRACT

This research full paper presents screening rates for mental health issues and life-stress events in engineering-focused community college students during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US. Specifically, it attempts to answer the following research questions: 1) What is the overall rate of various mental health conditions among engineering-focused community college students, 2) What effects has the pandemic had on baseline stress levels engineering-focused community college, and 3) What effects has the pandemic had on quality of life, such as sleep habits and financial security of engineering-focused community college students?Data for this paper was collected via survey from May-July 2020 and includes responses from 84 students at 24 community colleges. The survey itself was a compilation of several widely-used instruments for measuring overall mental health and stress levels in a population. These instruments include the Kessler-6 for psychological distress, the PHQ for anxiety, depression, and eating disorders, the PC-PTSD for PTSD-like symptoms, and the SRRS for inventorying stressful life events.Among the major findings, 32% of respondents reported a major change in financial situation, 27% reported loss of employment, and 13% reported ceasing formal schooling because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, 32% of respondents reported that the COVID-19 pandemic worsened their housing security situation, 38% reported that COVID-19 has worsened their food security situation, and 36% report that COVID-19 has decreased their ability to access instruction, course materials, or course supplies. Finally, of respondents who completed at least one mental health screening instrument, 70% screened positive for at least one potentially diagnosable condition, while only 9% reported ever receiving a mental health diagnosis. © 2022 IEEE.

8.
Nursing Management ; 54(1):7-12, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2190716

ABSTRACT

An academic-practice partnership to recruit and retain nurses [ FROM AUTHOR]

9.
Cogent Social Sciences ; 8(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2187832

ABSTRACT

The paper sought to find out whether gender influences the use of emerging technologies among higher education students at the University of Cape Coast. A data set of 357 respondents was used. It was found that more than half of the respondents were accustomed to the use of emerging technologies which translated in the improvement of their understanding of unclear concepts in their learning. However, the study showed no statistically significant difference in students' academic performance and their use of emerging technologies. The respondents indicated that they learn best when emerging technologies are available during the learning period (p = 0.017). Further, there was improvement in performance when respondents use emerging technologies to enhance learning. This study concludes that one should be circumspect when using emerging technologies in learning as they can contribute positively and negatively depending on the nature of usage.

10.
PS, Political Science & Politics ; 56(1):88-93, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2185386

ABSTRACT

Graduate students are primarily socialized into the political science profession in departments, with networks of peers and informal mentors providing crucial sources of support. This article describes one model of departmental professional socialization that the authors have led—the Graduate Student Caucus—which can improve graduate students' day-to-day lived experiences. In this model, a small cross-cohort group of students is elected for a year-long term to develop professional and social programming for graduate students and to assist them in navigating university bureaucracy, teaching and research responsibilities, and the job market. The Caucus also regularly compiles and presents student concerns to their department administrators to steer the program's direction. We describe the structure of the Caucus and its activities to highlight the benefits of this model and its adaptability to other institutional settings. Governance mechanisms like a Caucus cultivate trust, boost confidence, and demystify the "hidden curriculum” in the profession.

11.
Psychiatry Research ; : 115058, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2182518

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is not only an immediate hazard but also a long-term risk to the development of depressive symptoms. However, it remains unclear how people's depressive symptoms change with the process of COVID-19. Further, there is also a paucity of research on the underlying antecedents and outcomes of depressive symptoms during this global health crisis. In this study, a longitudinal study was conducted in China and the data of 559 participants were collected from the outbreak period to the normalization period of the pandemic through self-report questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were longitudinally analyzed using Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Core variables involving society, family, individual cognition, and behaviors were studied as determinants or consequences. Latent growth curve model analyses indicated that college students had mild depressive symptoms at the initial stage of COVID-19 with a subsequent decreasing linear slope. Depressive symptoms were significantly predicted by college students' risk perception of COVID-19, social support, family functioning, and smartphone addiction tendency. Further, their depressive symptoms predicted the changes in smartphone addiction tendency and levels of hope. In conclusion, current findings can provide implications for future prevention and intervention of mental disorders to assist college students through such challenging times.

12.
9th International Conference on Information Technology and Quantitative Management, ITQM 2022 ; 214:221-228, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2182431

ABSTRACT

Since the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, general secretary Xi Jinping has repeatedly stressed the issue of college students shouldering social responsibilities in the new era. He encourages college students to bear the responsibility of the times and learns to assume social responsibility. Based on the literature analysis, using the methods of data investigation and case analysis, the study explores how colleges and universities reasonably use and actively guide students to correctly understand and then agree to translate into action showing social responsibility. At the same time, according to the investigation of college students' sense of social responsibility, this paper analyzes the existing problems in education, so as to put forward objective and accurate feasible strategies and suggestions. © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

13.
J Psychiatr Res ; 159:33-41, 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2180923

ABSTRACT

To examine the prevalence of 12-month mood disorders and receipt of mental health treatment among a volunteer sample of higher education students during the 2nd and 3rd COVID-19 wave in the Flanders region. Web-based self-report surveys were obtained from 9101 students in higher education in the Flemish College Surveys (FLeCS) in Flanders, Belgium. As part of the World Health Organization's World Mental Health-International College Student Initiative, we screened for 12-month mood disorders (major depressive episode (MDE), mania/hypomania), and service use. We used poststratification weights to generate population-representative data on key socio-demographic characteristics. 50.6% of the respondents screened positive for 12-month mood disorders (46.8% MDE, of which 22.9% with very severe impact). Use of services was very low, with estimates of 35.4% for MDE, 31.7% for mania, and 25.5% for hypomania. Even among students with very severe disorders, treatment rates were never higher than 48.3%. Most common barriers for not using services were: the preference to handle the problem alone (83.4%) and not knowing where to seek professional help (79.8%). We found a high unmet need for mood problems among college students;though caution is needed in interpreting these findings given the volunteer nature of the sample. A reallocation of treatment resources for higher education students should be considered, particulary services that focus on innovative, low-threshold, and scalable interventions.

14.
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology ; 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2176078

ABSTRACT

Background Due to the limitation of drug treatment and other adverse reactions, many psychological treatments always adopt rehabilitation training or non-drug intervention methods, while physical exercise is considered as an auxiliary way. A mass of literature has verified the therapeutic benefits of physical exercise to reduce depression and anxiety in clinical populations. However, little attention is paid to the mental health benefits of exercise for non-clinical populations. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to systematically aggregate and quantify findings of the effect of physical exercise on depression and anxiety in non-clinical populations, through which to evaluate whether physical exercise intervention as a non-drug means can effectively improve the depressive and anxious moods of college students. Significance This paper combines sport and psychotherapy and links kinesiology and psychology, which can deepen readers' understanding and stimulate their interest in the practice of sport and exercise psychology. The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has swept the world, causing a global epidemic with serious physical and psychological consequences, and this study may help policymakers and health care professionals to make effective recommendations for psychological interventions for college students. Methods The study was based on five electronic databases: CNKI, Wan Fang Data, SinoMed, PubMed, and Web of Science. The quality of the selected articles was evaluated by the PEDro scale. The Meta-Analysis was performed using R-4.0.4, which computed pooled estimates of effect size and respective 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for intervention. Bias and sensitivity analyses were calculated to explore the source of heterogeneity, and subgroup analyses were performed according to time, frequency, and event. Results Synthesizing all the trials, the results show that the study heterogeneity of physical exercise on the improvement of depressive mood in college students is relatively high (I2=63%, P<0.01), which has a medium effect (SMD=-0.63, 95% confidence interval=-0.80 to -0.46). The results reveal low heterogeneity in anxious mood (I2=36%, P = 0.04), with a medium effect (SMD=-0.58, 95% confidence interval=-0.71 to -0.44). Conclusion The Meta-Analysis confirms the effective and positive role of physical exercise in reducing depressive and anxious moods of college students. Physical exercise can be used as a non-medical method to improve the mental health state of college students and promote full development. Further research should evaluate the impact of various sports and specific exercise prescriptions on college students' negative emotions, so as to apply them to complementary and alternative therapies.

15.
J Shanghai Jiaotong Univ Sci ; : 1-9, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2175076

ABSTRACT

In response to the new round of COVID-19 outbreaks since March 2022, universities with high outbreak rates around the country have taken quarantine measures to contain the epidemic. Evidence from previous coronavirus outbreaks has shown that people under quarantine are at risk for mental health disorders. To better understand the impacts of this round of COVID-19 quarantine on domestic college students and their responses, we conducted a systematic survey to assess the stress and anxiety, and to evaluate effective measurements in this population. We searched relevant documents and literature, and designed a questionnaire from six aspects, including psychological status, epidemic situation, study, daily life, sports, and interpersonal communication, with 51 items in total. We sent the questionnaire on the Wenjuanxing Web platform, from April 2 to 8, 2022. We evaluated the mental status according to parts of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21), and investigated the influencing risk factors and countermeasures. Statistical analysis was performed by using the Chi-square test and multi-variable logistic regression. In total, 508 college respondents were recruited in our survey, and the pooled prevalence of mild anxiety (GAD score ≽ 5, or DASS-21 anxiety score ≽ 8) or stress (DASS-21 pressure score ≽ 14) caused by the new round of COVID-19 pandemic quarantine was 19.69% (100/508). The prevalence of the anxiety or stress in college students with COVID-19 quarantine between different genders, regions, and majors was not significantly different. Independent risk factors for the mild anxiety or stress of undergraduates by COVID-19 quarantine included learning efficiency or duration [OR = 1.36, 95%CI (1.14-1.62), P = 0.001], based on the combined analysis of Chi-square test analysis with multi-variable logistic regression analysis. Interestingly, the mental well-beings before COVID-19 epidemic quarantine [OR = 0.22, 95%CI (0.13-0.36), P < 0.0001], more low-intensity exercise [OR = 0.36, 95%CI (0.15-0.87), P = 0.02, high-intensity exercise as reference], and good sleep quality [OR = 0.14, 95%CI (0.07-0.30), P < 0.0001: OR = 0.42, 95%CI (0.30-0.59), P < 0.0001] are protective factors for alleviating the quarantine-caused anxiety or stress in Chinese college students for this round of COVID-19 epidemic quarantine. During the round of COVID-19 epidemic quarantine in 2022, a small number of college students have mild anxiety, affected by decreased learning efficiency or duration, which could be mitigated with low-intensity exercise and good sleep quality.

16.
Current Psychology ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2175063

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic was a stressful event for all. It threatened people's physical and mental health. Previous studies have found that resilience can help people deal with stress and difficulties more effectively and prevent them from mental health problems. Coping style mediates the relationship between resilience and psychological well-being. Given the novelty and recency of the COVID-19, it is unknown whether resilience can also protect individuals in new difficulties, and whether the previous effective coping styles can be applied to new situations. The current study aimed to explore the influence mechanism of college students' resilience on negative stress response during the pandemic, and the chain mediation of coping style and positive adaptive response. A questionnaire survey was conducted among 910 college students (Mage = 20.58 years;41.1% men, 58.9% women) studying in Shanghai by stratified random cluster sampling. At that time, they were in 27 different provinces and cities because of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. The research tools included Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ), Positive Adaptive Response Questionnaire (PARQ), and Negative Stress Reaction Questionnaire (NSRQ). The results showed that: (1) College students' resilience, coping style, positive adaptive response and negative stress reaction were significantly correlated with each other;(2) Resilience could not directly affect negative stress reaction, but it could affect negative stress reaction through the chain mediation of coping style and positive adaptive response. These findings suggest that resilience enhancement intervention programs need to focus on the cultivation of individual positive coping style;In response to major emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic, officials can help people reduce negative stress reaction by disseminating positive coping strategies through the media. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

17.
Advances in Language and Literary Studies ; 13(2):25-32, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169974

ABSTRACT

During the Covid-19 pandemic situation, the English literature learning and assessment have moved from classroom form to online form. This study emphasizes on the challenges of online English literature learning and students' experience and expectation regarding online English literature course assessment in private universities of Bangladesh. English literature students were invited to participate in the survey and 326 students from 10 private universities partook. Students dwelling in towns and villages addressed their problems what they experienced while attending online literature class and assessment. Previous researches shed light on abrupt transit to online education in different countries including Bangladesh, voices and views of teachers and students of English and other departments, even on language courses, but none of them addressed the situation English literature students of private universities undergo during the pandemic of Covid-19, which stopped on-sight education across the globe. This paper determines to elaborate the challenges, experience, expectation and overall voices of English literature students from private universities of Bangladesh regarding online literature class and assessment. This qualitative research labels students' exact problems and recommendation which will help minimize the loss of students' learning, thus, will benefit the students of English literature of Bangladeshi private universities. The findings will also assist the instructors to overcome the challenges of online English literature teaching and assessment.

18.
Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing ; 13(4):491-494, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169897

ABSTRACT

Knowing the relationship between Covid-anxiety and Covid-disbelief was felt significant in the context of people's (in particular youths') non-compliance to the Covid-19 Pandemic restrictions. The study involved 137 (females=107, males=30) college students who tilled 'Corona virus anxiety scale' and 'Covid-19 disbelief scale' through Google form. The correlation found between Covid-anxiety and Covid-disbelief was moderate positive. However, it was significant in males but not in females. Next, corona virus anxiety can explain 17% of variance in Corona-disbelief in males. Thus, Covid-anxiety appears to create an unhealthy reaction of Covid-disbelief in men but not in women. Various studies supporting the above findings are discussed. Further Covid-disbelief in men in response to Covid-anxiety is explained in terms of 'Covid-disbelief' as a defense mechanism,'Covid-disbelief as reinforcer', 'men's tendency of using expressive suppression', and 'toxic masculinity'. The implications are discussed in detail.

19.
TOJET : The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology ; 22(1), 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169352

ABSTRACT

This paper deals with the results of students during the preparing courses of mathematics for entrance exams at an university. These courses take place every year and since the Covid-19 period, they are not only face-to-face, but also online. The study involves students of secondary schools who apply to the university of economics. This report compares results of tests of two different classes of these students and from different parts of mathematics. These tests are in the form of online quizzes. We do not prove if there are differences between the scores of students of short-time or long-time courses. In addition, we compare the results with the students from the year before. We also emphasize the more problematic topics of mathematics.

20.
Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia ; 31(1):43, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169243

ABSTRACT

Institutions of higher learning were rapidly made to change from in-person to fully online learning due to the Covid-19 pandemic. This change posed an inherent problem in successfully engaging students in learning in a remote learning environment. Thus, the study aims to enhance students' problem-solving skills through self-directed learning in a Smart Learning Environment. A cohort of first year undergraduate students (n=147) in a private university were given the task to solve a programming problem in a fully online course, in a team. These students had never been in a formal online course nor met their course mates face-to-face due to the pandemic. Various digital tools, including Zoom, Edmodo, and others, were used in this learning environment. A Likert-scale survey and open-ended questions were used to obtain data on the attitude and perception of the students towards the self-directed learning environment. An exploratory factor analysis was performed on the data to reduce the factors to several constructs, such as self-management, self-monitoring, motivation and teamwork. In completing the task, students took more control of their learning, self-monitored themselves and remained committed and motivated to reach their learning outcomes and goals. There were encouraging and positive evidence that students were able to be effectively engaged in a smart learning environment and were more independent but not isolated learners.

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