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1.
International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning ; 17(3):327-331, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2104057

ABSTRACT

This edition of the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning comes just as many of us are about to or have recently begun a new academic year. Though COVID continues to be a force to contend with, this Fall brings a marked change from the past few Falls in terms of the ability to gather and enjoy community. This September issue comprises four full articles with three interrelated themes, namely, the ability to grow, assessments to measure growth, and real time assessment through analytics to prompt growth. These topics are contextualized within challenging contexts where growth occurs as individuals reach beyond the comfort zone of their own perspective, culture, and history, and reach out for others different from themselves. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 22(1): 283, 2022 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sudden outbreak of COVID-19 in early 2020 pushed the online health-care communities (OHCs) into the public eye in China. However, OHCs is an emerging service model, which still has many problems such as low patient trust and low patient utilization rate. Patients are the users and recipients of web-based medical services, as well as the core of medical services. Thus, based on cue utilization theory, this paper studies combination effect of influencing factors in patients' purchase of web-based medical services through the qualitative comparative analysis method of fuzzy sets (fsQCA). METHODS: This paper discards statistical methods based on variance theory-based relationships between explanatory and explained variables and uses a construct theory-based fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) approach to elucidate such complex relationships of patients' online purchasing behavior. We use a crawler to automatically download information from Haodf.com. This study crawled data in August 2020, involving 1210 physicians. RESULTS: Service price, reputation and service quality are the key factors for patients' purchasing behavior. Physician's online reputation, online medical service price, number of published articles, mutual-help group, and appointment registration affect patients' purchasing behavior by means of weighted variation. Only when a high scope of internal attribute-related cue elements and a low scope of external attribute-related cue elements are combined with each other in a specific form, patients will generate purchase behavior. CONCLUSION: This paper clarifies the complex causes that promote to patients' purchasing behavior of web-based medical services, enriches and develops the relevant theories in the field of consumer purchasing behavior and online health-care communities market research, and has implications for governments, platforms, physicians and patients in the event of web-based medical service purchases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Cues , Physician-Patient Relations , China
3.
Int J Educ Res Open ; 2: 100048, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095462

ABSTRACT

The disruption in higher education caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has led to renewed interest in implementing communities of practice (CoPs) as a feasible mechanism for delivering faculty development. The construct of community of practice is cited in the literature among the most important strategies for professional development. However, empirical evidence of the impact of CoPs on teaching and learning is scarce and we still know little about the extent to which faculty participation in CoPs affect their teaching practices and students' learning and achievement. This scoping review aims to collect, synthesize, and map existing evidence about the impact of CoPs in higher education. The review is guided by a conceptual framework, which incorporates six elements underlying the purpose and expected outcomes of CoPs: resources and the capacity to mobilize them, knowledge management activities and the expansion of knowledge, changes in policy and practice, and impact on higher education outcomes.

4.
Educational Research ; : 1-18, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2087425

ABSTRACT

Background Purpose Methods Findings Conclusion The question of how best to support children who are refugees to resettle and thrive in a new country is important and complex. One of the many challenges experienced by such children is disrupted education. It is widely recognised that a sense of belonging and integration within a new school and community are key to enhancing children’s chances of achieving their potential. Tutoring programmes, where tutors work one-to-one with tutees, can offer a form of support in this regard.Set within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study sought to explore experiences of tutors involved in a pilot project in Scotland for primary schoolchildren from a refugee community. The home-based, online tutoring project focused on building confidence and a sense of belonging in order to support achievement in school.Participants were 18 tutors who had taken part in the pilot project. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to gather rich data about the tutors’ experiences of working with the children from the refugee community. Data were analysed qualitatively, using a reflexive thematic analytical approach.Tutors believed that relationships between tutor and child were essential to success. Personalisation appeared key to building confidence and helping children progress. Tutors spent time getting to know their tutee and took care to let their tutee get to know them as a person, as a way of bringing down barriers and helping the child connect. Tutors reported that they needed knowledge of the local curriculum, liaison with class teachers and understanding of the refugee community. They described the peer support network as invaluable for sharing knowledge. Although each worked with a different child, tutors learned from and assisted each other through their support network, sharing resources and ideas.The study highlights the value of a professional learning community, particularly when tutors are working in isolation. It also draws attention to the importance of training for tutors taking on such roles, including support with the pastoral aspects of working with a child, such as the personalisation and relationship-building that was of such significance in this study. [ FROM AUTHOR]

5.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; : 10499091221116794, 2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089093

ABSTRACT

Background: Death can be difficult to address personally, to discuss and to plan for. Since 2016 The Omega Course (Omega) has educated local people in Kenilworth, UK, about death and dying; broaching these issues and teaching communication skills whilst enabling social interaction. It aspires to produce practical outcomes with positive implications for end of life (EoL) planning and future neighbourhood care within the town. Aim: To investigate the impact of Omega on the attitudes and actions of participants. Method: Anonymous questionnaires, distributed by Qualtrics, or by post if preferred, were sent to 62 participants of Omega aged 22-94 two and a half years post course institution. Thematic analysis and inferential statistics were used. Results: 23 replies (37%) scored changes across 4 areas; barriers to discussion, ease discussing death, fears about death and future planning capability. All showed a significant beneficial change using a Paired Sample t-test (P< .01). Respondents noted common fears of death and dying, barriers to discussing the topic and planning for it. The course helped to allay fear, enabled discussion and encouraged planning for death and EoL. Respondents rated the course as 9.1/10 for achieving its aims. They appreciated discussing death and dying in a supportive environment and found the approach effective in developing their skills and changing attitudes. Conclusion: Omega has the potential to change attitudes towards death; promoting discussion, planning, and tackling misconceptions.

6.
2021 Ieee 9th International Conference on Healthcare Informatics (Ichi 2021) ; : 265-269, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082704

ABSTRACT

During the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, subreddits on Reddit, such as r/Coronavirus saw a rapid growth in user's requests for help (support seekers - SSs) including individuals with varying professions and experiences with diverse perspectives on care (support providers - SPs). Currently, knowledgeable human moderators match an SS with a user with relevant experience, i.e, an SP on these subreddits. This unscalable process defers timely care. We present a medical knowledge-infused approach to efficient matching of SS and SPs validated by experts for the users affected by anxiety and depression, in the context of with COVID-19. After matching, each SP to an SS labeled as either supportive, informative, or similar (sharing experiences) using the principles of natural language inference. Evaluation by 21 domain experts indicates the efficacy of incorporated knowledge and shows the efficacy the matching system.

7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 986933, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080294

ABSTRACT

Background: With the rapid development of "Internet + medicine" and the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic, online health communities have become an important way for patients to seek medical treatment. However, the mistrust between physicians and patients in online health communities has long existed and continues to impact the decision-making behavior of patients. The purpose of this article is to explore the influencing factors of patient decision-making in online health communities by identifying the relationship between physicians' online information and patients' selection behavior. Methods: In this study, we selected China's Good Doctor (www.haodf.com) as the source of data, scrapped 10,446 physician data from December 2020 to June 2021 to construct a logit model of online patients' selection behavior, and used regression analysis to test the hypotheses. Results: The number of types of services, number of scientific articles, and avatar in physicians' personal information all has a positive effect on patients' selection behavior, while the title and personal introduction hurt patients' selection behavior. Online word-of-mouth positively affected patients' selection behavior and disease risk had a moderating effect. Conclusion: Focusing on physician-presented information, this article organically combines the Elaboration likelihood model with trust source theory and online word-of-mouth from the perspective of the trusted party-physician, providing new ideas for the study of factors influencing patients' selection behavior in online health communities. The findings provide useful insights for patients, physicians, and community managers about the relationship between physician information and patients' selection behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Likelihood Functions , COVID-19/epidemiology , Trust
8.
Mar Pollut Bull ; 185(Pt A): 114259, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076500

ABSTRACT

The restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a global hiatus in anthropogenic activities; several scientists have utilized this unique opportunity to assess the human impact on biological systems. In this study, the study describes for a period of five years (2018-2022) how the faunal community have been affected by human disturbances, as well as the effect of the "anthropause" period driven by the COVID-19 lockdown. The results confirmed human disturbances on faunal communities related to coastal urbanization. It was found that the "anthropause" period showed the highest values of abundance and biomass, hence the "COVID-19 lockdown" allowed recovery of faunal communities. The findings highlight the impact of human disturbances and that the community showed resilience. Overall, the authorities must perform restrictive measures aiming to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic activities in the study area including the banning of off-road and recreational vehicles, carrying out efficient cleaning and grooming operations, monitoring the severe harvesting of edible species, as well as penalizing the disposal of anthropogenic waste and sewage discharge from the touristic facilities. Likewise, management actions such as the temporal beach closures and the regular surveillance could be advantageous to provide a more sustainable exploitation of sandy beaches.

9.
Journal of Librarianship and Information Science ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070666

ABSTRACT

This study reports on a series of focus groups of UK public library users to understand how the forced closure of UK libraries caused by the COVID pandemic and the increased use of replacement digital services affected their library use. We specifically focus on digital exclusion and whether this increased as the result of physical library services being inaccessible. We show that although digital exclusion did increase as the result of library closures, digital exclusion was not the best way to characterise our participants' experiences and digital choices was a more suitable concept. We show how public library users adapted to library closures, how they coped with these closures, and how they intend to use library services in the future. Our participants reported different patterns of use of digital and physical library services, had different experiences of these two modes of library service, and described their value in different terms. We explore what they valued in physical and digital services and show how simple arguments that digital services can replace physical ones do not match the experiences or wishes of those who use these services.

10.
Journal of Workplace Learning ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070244

ABSTRACT

Purpose This paper aims to examine how a social entrepreneurial organisation in Sweden collectively learned to adapt itself to the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach Using an abductive approach, this study conducted single case fieldwork on a social entrepreneurial organisation called SFE. The following research questions were asked: What are the changes in collective learning conditions that SFE has to face during the pandemic? What are the outcomes of collective learning during the pandemic in SFE? Findings This study results indicate that collective learning conditions were changed by restructuring the organisation's design and teamwork during the pandemic, which facilitated sharing of knowledge and experiences. This collective learning helped the organisation develop new virtual projects during the pandemic. Another result of this collective learning was the members' new shared understanding of the organisation's vision. Research limitations/implications This study hopes to broaden the understanding of the relationship between collective learning in organisations and organisational adaptation in times of crisis. Practical implications This study can help leaders of social entrepreneurial organisations understand what changes are necessary to create a team that collectively learns. Originality/value The data had the advantage of being gathered as a real-time process, and the researcher witnessed how the organisation achieved adaptation as it happened and not just through its members' reflection of it as a past phenomenon.

11.
Convergencia-Revista De Ciencias Sociales ; 29, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072442

ABSTRACT

The pandemic makes way to a whole range of communi-tarian projects, and to deal with the crisis. We highlight those fostered by feminist organizations, i.e. actions motivated exclusively by women, who propose to be mutually supportive to tackle multidimensional vulnerability increased by the pandemic. Thus, this paper explores three communitarian actions led by feminists in three Chilean cities from the center-south zone (Rancagua, Talca and Chillan), in order to learn and understand their arrangements to deal with the most urgent needs during the pandemic. This exploration was developed through online interviews with some leaders of the three initiatives. Among the main findings, we found a strong conviction for politicizing the intimate sphere, constructing a network of solidarity deemed safe for women, which allows them to stick together against any adversity. All this takes place across horizontal social relations, and mutual and self-care.

12.
Iconos ; 26(3):95-115, 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067396

ABSTRACT

En este artículo se analiza la implicación de las madres, los padres y representantes legales en el aprendizaje activo de niños y niñas que cursan grados de primaria y secundaria en un escenario particular: la enseñanza en línea durante la pandemia por la covid-19 en Ecuador. Para ello, se aplicó un cuestionario de 45 preguntas a una muestra de 6206 personas segmentadas según su zona geográfica. En el área rural, el grado de involucramiento en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje virtual se refleja, particularmente, al establecer el horario de sueño y en la aceptación por parte de los y las estudiantes de las críticas sobre las actividades realizadas. Para la zona urbana, se evidencia el manejo del enojo de los niños y las niñas, y el reconocimiento de sus fortalezas en las asignaturas. En cuanto a las estrategias, en el área rural aumenta la presión de progenitoras/es sobre educandos y educandas a fin de que realicen las actividades escolares, en tanto que, en la urbana, dialogan más con sus hijos e hijas cuando pierden el control, prestando más atención a sus emociones y necesidades. Así, la diferenciación se condensa en la siguiente expresión: en las zonas rurales, las madres, los padres y representantes se enfocan en la disciplina, mientras que en las urbanas se orientan hacia el espectro académico y emocional.Alternate :This article analyzes the involvement of mothers, fathers, and legal guardians in the active learning of children in primary and secondary schools in a particular scenario: online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ecuador. For this purpose, a 45-question survey was applied to a sample of 6,206 people, segmented according to their geographic areas. In the rural area, the degree of involvement in virtual teaching-learning processes is reflected, in particular, in the establishment of sleep schedules and the acknowledgement by student of criticisms of their activities. For the urban area, children's anger management and the recognition of their strengths in subject matters are evident. In terms of strategies, in rural areas, parents put more pressure on students to carry out school activities, whereas in urban areas, parents talk more with their children when they lose control, paying more attention to their emotions and needs. Thus, the differentiation is summarized in the following expression: in rural areas, mothers, fathers, and guardians focus on discipline, while in urban areas they are oriented towards the academic and emotional spectrum.

13.
Gates Open Research ; 4:1-17, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067243

ABSTRACT

In contexts of scarce resources, varied assets, and diverse communities, engaging local stakeholders in the problem-solving process is critical to develop interventions for HIV prevention and treatment. Communities of practice (CPs) - groups of people organized around a key purpose and a delivery point - can develop expertise in identifying their local community's key challenges and selecting viable solutions. We propose a framework for systematically understanding the stages a CP may go through as it develops its capacity to identify and solve problems and implement good practices. Our framework is based on the experience of practitioners of the LISTEN model (Local Initiatives Scaled Through Enterprise Networks) in eight local-level CPs in Kenya and Eswatini. LISTEN seeks to help CPs integrate continuous improvement processes, data, and human-centered design into their development and solutioning activities. The four stages in our framework for a CP's problem-solving journey are: 1) Community Identity: Identify and understand the community's purpose and goals, and build rapport with its members and leaders;2) Quick Win: Use a process of human-centered design to obtain a rapid and clear success in addressing a problem that the local community has identified for itself and which it can tackle with its own resources;3) Stewardship: Support the CP in addressing more complex or long-term issues, including links to other CPs at the localcommunity or higher levels to disseminate knowledge and obtain resources and support, where needed;and 4) Evolution: Support the CP as it transitions into potentially new structures or functions. For each stage of the framework, we describe the kinds of support that may be provided to the CP in the LISTEN model, and the types of tools that could be developed to assist them in problem-solving and in disseminating sustainable solutions. Copyright © 2020. Hanschke C et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

14.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12949, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066486

ABSTRACT

Pujon Kidul Village, Pujon District, Malang Regency, is an area with tourism potential that has been developed since 2017 with the concept of agricultural tourism. Throughout the development of tourism villages, Pujon Kidul Village has succeeded in accelerating economic growth and providing jobs for the community. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, tourism villages have been severely affected, leading to the temporary closure of tourist attractions and community businesses. This research aimed to identify what indicators form social capital variables and the relationship between social capital variables and community adaptation patterns in dealing with pandemics in the study location. This was quantitative research with confirmatory factor analysis to determine the indicators of forming social capital and structural equation modeling analysis to determine the relationship between the variables. Based on the findings, it is known that trust in forming a social network is 0.468. Furthermore, the social network forms community actions of 0.046 and influences community resilience by 0.007. Therefore, good social capital will make it easier for the community to participate in collective action as a form of caring for each other during the pandemic. This action also influences the community to survive in a pandemic crisis, thus creating an adaptation pattern for the Pujon Kidul Tourism Village community in facing a pandemic.

15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065970

ABSTRACT

Indigenous Peoples are at an increased risk for infectious disease, including COVID-19, due to the historically embedded deleterious social determinants of health. Furthermore, structural limitations in Canadian federal government data contribute to the lack of comparative rates of COVID-19 between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. To make visible Indigenous Peoples' experiences in the public health discourse in the midst of COVID-19, this paper aims to answer the following interrelated research questions: (1) What are the associations of key social determinants of health and COVID-19 cases among Canadian health regions? and (2) How do these relationships relate to Indigenous communities? As both proximal and distal social determinants of health conjointly contribute to COVID-19 impacts on Indigenous health, this study used a unique dataset assembled from multiple sources to examine the associations among key social determinants of health characteristics and health with a focus on Indigenous Peoples. We highlight key social vulnerabilities that stem from systemic racism and that place Indigenous populations at increased risk for COVID-19. Many Indigenous health issues are rooted in the historical impacts of colonization, and partially invisible due to systemic federal underfunding in Indigenous communities. The Canadian government must invest in collecting accurate, reliable, and disaggregated data on COVID-19 case counts for Indigenous Peoples, as well as in improving Indigenous community infrastructure and services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services, Indigenous , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Indigenous Peoples , Social Vulnerability
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065931

ABSTRACT

This study examined relationships between family cohesion, social support/spiritual support, and quality of life and depression among faith-based community members during the 2020 COVID-19 restrictions. Drawing upon the buffering model of social support and family cohesion as theoretical frameworks, the authors examined these factors in a survey of 551 faith-based community members between March 2020 and June 2020. Family cohesion had a direct and indirect effect (mediated by overall social support and spiritual support on quality of life). Moreover, family cohesion only had a direct effect on depression (e.g., not mediated by overall social support or spiritual support). Greater family cohesion and overall social support were predictive of increased COVID-19-prevention behaviors, while spiritual support was predictive of reduced COVID-19-prevention behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Depression , Humans , Social Cohesion , Social Support
17.
Journal of Humanistic Psychology ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2064444

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic added another layer of trauma for working-class communities who have experienced trauma from systemic inequity and racism. Early pandemic response efforts failed to reach the most vulnerable Latinx communities in the United States due to historic disinvestment in these communities. Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) were uniquely positioned to respond to the pandemic through testing and vaccine implementation because of their footprint in these communities. However, to advance equitable COVID-19 recovery and long-term, trauma-informed community resilience, FQHCs need to expand their role beyond immediate response through testing and vaccine deployment. Applying Freirean principles of liberation to an integrated model for crisis recovery and community resilience-building, this article presents a case study of the implementation of a COVID-19 vaccine outreach and education initiative at AltaMed Health Services, one of the largest FQHCs in the United States. Findings suggest that leveraging organizing and empowerment strategies to implement COVID-19 vaccine distribution in working-class communities contributes to pathways for community health and well-being, infrastructure for crisis response and recovery, equitable service and information delivery ecosystems, and engaged and empowered communities. Lessons from this study can provide a blueprint for integrating strategies for long-term community resilience, capacity-building, and empowerment in crisis response and community harm mitigation initiatives. Findings from this study also present a model for enhancing the role of FQHCs to facilitate community organizing and engagement for health equity. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Humanistic Psychology is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

18.
Journal of Beliefs & Values ; 43(4):461-479, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2062665

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to understand what specific religious values are being transmitted to children through online Shia religious communities during the pandemic. Twenty-seven mothers were sampled from three cities of Pakistan. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview guide and analysed using thematic content analysis. Eleven themes were found, under two broad categories of: (a) Transmitting beliefs and influencing religious practice and (b) Developing community orientation. Perceived as a coping and support mechanism during COVID-19, findings reveal that Shia mothers are dependent on the online religious community for the transmission of sectarian values and also wider community morals in their children. This study also implies the preference for online religious services beyond the pandemic, mainly due to the convenience of home-based participation, privacy, and consumerism.

19.
CAB Abstracts; 2022.
Preprint in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: ppcovidwho-345451

ABSTRACT

Background: Over 50 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed globally as of November 2020. Evidence is rapidly emerging on the epidemiology of COVID-19, and its impact on individuals and potential burden on health services and society. Between 10-35% of people with COVID-19 may experience post-acute long Covid. This currently equates to between 8,129 and 28,453 people in Scotland. Some of these people will require rehabilitation to support their recovery. Currently, we do not know how to optimally configure community rehabilitation services for people with long Covid.

20.
Marit Stud ; 21(4): 533-552, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2060112

ABSTRACT

Small-scale fishers and fishing communities have long suffered marginalisation and discrimination in South Africa. New laws and policies promulgated as the result of a court case brought by small-scale fishers, NGOs and academics attempt to rectify this problem. Drawing on the poverty-vulnerability-marginalisation framework, the paper considers whether this regulatory regime reduces vulnerability and marginalisation within the sector as an important precursor to poverty reduction initiatives, such as improved rights allocation. While the new regulatory regime is a step in the right direction, the paper ultimately finds that there are shortcomings in these laws, many of which have been thrown into sharp relief by the rights implementation process and COVID-19 lockdowns. These include narrow eligibility criteria for fishing rights, a lack of substantive solutions when it comes to vulnerable groups, processes insufficient to prevent elite capture, and impediments to the practice of alternative livelihoods. These shortcomings must be addressed through the appropriate expansion of access rights, consultation with fishers and more inclusive drafting, if the contribution of small-scale fisheries to development and poverty reduction in South Africa is to be realised.

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