Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 80
Filter
1.
Keio J Med ; 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2198213

ABSTRACT

This study investigated lifestyle changes and the self-reported mental health status of Japanese community residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Differences in demography, daily lifestyle changes, and approaches to problem solving were analyzed in two age cohorts (<60 vs ≥60 years). The prevalence of moderate/increased psychological distress was 31.7%, with no significant difference between the cohorts. Compared with the pre-COVID-19 era, more than 80% of the participants stopped eating out and spent more time at home, and more than 70% used public transport less frequently. There were significant differences between the cohorts for the time spent at home, opportunities to eat meals outside of home, and shopping in stores. Participants aged under 60 years were less likely to use television and newspapers or to consult a family doctor. Those aged over 60 years were less likely to consult friends/colleagues or to use the Internet/social networking services. Identifying the risk factors for psychological distress is warranted for implementing measures to maintain and improve the physical and mental health of residents.

2.
Pharmaceutical Journal ; 309(7965), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2196671
3.
Nursing Critical Care ; 15(3):4, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2190694
4.
Drug Topics ; 166(8):20-22, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2170230
5.
New Zealand Medical Journal ; 133(1522):9-14, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2168273
6.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(19):1299-1311, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2206892

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to identify the level of satisfaction of parents of students with learning difficulties towards distance learning after the Corona pandemic, and also aimed to identify if there are statistically significant differences about the level of satisfaction of parents of students with learning difficulties towards distance learning after the Corona pandemic, and in order to achieve this, the researchers used the descriptive analytical approach, where the study population consisted of all parents of students with learning difficulties in both Nablus and Kuwait City. Satisfaction of parents of students with learning difficulties towards distance learning after the Corona pandemic and it consisted of three areas. The level of satisfaction of parents of students with learning difficulties towards distance learning after the Corona pandemic was average, and it was found that there were no statistically significant differences at the level (alpha<= 0.05) in the level of satisfaction of parents of students with learning difficulties towards distance learning after the Corona pandemic. after c Corona list according to the kinship variable, the educational qualification of the mother, the educational qualification of the father, and based on the results of the study, the study came out with several recommendations, the most important of which was the need to train teachers of learning difficulties on how to effectively deal with students with learning difficulties during distance education, providing appropriate suggestions by parents from In order to increase the effectiveness of distance education for students with special needs. Copyright © 2022, Anka Publishers. All rights reserved.

7.
Journal of Pharmaceutical Negative Results ; 13:6243-6251, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2206805

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 pandemic has quickly spread over the world between 2019 and 2020, reaching Indonesia and Papua Province. Furthermore, public health services are affected by this pandemic. Therefore, this study differentiates between the infected, treated, recovering, and dying of Covid-19 patients in bad and good regencies in Papua Province. During the epidemic, a cross-sectional approach was employed to compare and contrast the health care services in bad and good regencies. This study's secondary and primary data were analyzed using a paired samples t-test. According to the results, the several factors that differentiate between bad and good regencies, include the confirmation of Covid-19, being treated, healed, died, the Covid-19 pandemic, integrated health service posts, community health service centers, hospital health services, and doctors/midwives practice. Copyright © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

8.
MDM Policy Pract ; 7(2): 23814683221116304, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2195926

ABSTRACT

Background. In Canada, caregivers of older adults receiving home care face difficult decisions that may lead to decision regret. We assessed difficult decisions and decision regret among caregivers of older adults receiving home care services and factors associated with decision regret. Methods. From March 13 to 30, 2020, at the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted an online survey with caregivers of older adults receiving home care in the 10 Canadian provinces. We distributed a self-administered questionnaire through Canada's largest and most representative private online panel. We identified types of difficult health-related decisions faced in the past year and their frequency and evaluated decision regret using the Decision Regret Scale (DRS), scored from 0 to 100. We performed descriptive statistics as well as bivariable and multivariable linear regression to identify factors predicting decision regret. Results. Among 932 participants, the mean age was 42.2 y (SD = 15.6 y), and 58.4% were male. The most frequently reported difficult decisions were regarding housing and safety (75.1%). The mean DRS score was 28.8/100 (SD = 8.6). Factors associated with less decision regret included higher caregiver age, involvement of other family members in the decision-making process, wanting to receive information about the options, and considering organizations interested in the decision topic and health care professionals as trustworthy sources of information (all P < 0.001). Factors associated with more decision regret included mismatch between the caregiver's preferred option and the decision made, the involvement of spouses in the decision-making process, higher decisional conflict, and higher burden of care (all P < 0.001). Discussion. Decisions about housing and safety were the difficult decisions most frequently encountered by caregivers of older adults in this survey. Our results will inform future decision support interventions. Highlights: This is one of the first studies to assess decision regret among caregivers of older adults receiving home and community care services and to identify their most frequent difficult decisions.Difficult decisions were most frequently about housing and safety. Most caregivers of older adults in all 10 provinces of Canada experienced decision regret.Factors associated with less decision regret included higher caregiver age, the involvement of other family members in the decision-making process, wanting to receive information about the options, considering organizations interested in the decision topic, and health care professionals as trustworthy sources of information. Factors associated with more decision regret included mismatch between the caregiver's preferred option and the decision made, the involvement of spouses in the decision-making process, higher decisional conflict, and higher burden of care.

9.
J Health Serv Res Policy ; : 13558196221135119, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2153419

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To estimate changes in Boston Emergency Services Team (BEST) psychiatric emergency services (PES) encounter volume (total and by care team) and inpatient disposition during the first 8 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data on 30,657 PES encounters was extracted from the four-county, BEST reporting system. The study period consisted of the first 34 weeks of 2019 and 2020. This period corresponded to the first five stages of Massachusetts's COVID-19 public health restrictions: pre-lockdown, lockdown, Phase I, II and III reopenings. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed to estimate changes in encounter volume by care team and disposition. RESULTS: Compared to the same period in 2019, covariate-adjusted, weekly PES encounters decreased by 39% (β = -0.40, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = [-0.51, -0.28], p < 0.00) during the lockdown. PES volume remained significantly lower during Phase I reopening compared to the previous year but returned to 2019 levels during Phase II. The covariate-adjusted proportion of weekly encounters that led to inpatient admission significantly increased by 16% (CI = [0.11, 0.21], p < 0.00) for mobile crisis teams (MCTs) and significantly declined by 13% (CI = [-0.19, -0.07], p < 0.00) for BEST-designated emergency departments during the lockdown period compared to the prior year. CONCLUSIONS: The overall drop in PES utilization and the rise in inpatient admissions for MCT encounters suggests that during the early phases of the pandemic, patients delayed psychiatric care until they had a psychiatric crisis. Public health messaging about the lockdowns and absent equivalent messaging about the availability of telehealth services may have made patients more reluctant to seek psychiatric care.

10.
Salud Publica de Mexico ; 64(6):599-605, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2164465

ABSTRACT

This essay discusses the need for schools of public health to convene to implement the practice of public health teaching and research by training health leaders, generating knowledge, and providing health and social services that contribute to the well-being of the community. Since their inception, the academic, research and service programs of some schools have been designed to serve as partners and allies of governments and the health sector in general. Part of their role has been to identify health risks to communities, design strategies to address major problems affecting health, create databases for assessment and intervention in conditions affecting the health of communities, as well as advise government authorities and other social sectors in health education efforts and preventive approaches. These programs have also been an essential part of the design, evaluation and implementation of organizational models of health services and institutional and community clinical care, in addition to integrate public health and health services in the development of unique models at the national level. Likewise, these have extended the scope of actions and services to other state agencies, companies and private health sector organizations, which benefit directly from the experience of the schools of public health. The academic, research and service programs have also strengthened the professional competencies of graduates of the academic programs, who occupy essential decision-making positions.

11.
Ciencia e Saude Coletiva ; 27(11):4125-4130, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2140940

ABSTRACT

In this interview, Sonia Guajajara, the executive coordinator of the Brazil's Indigenous Peoples Articulation (APIB), addresses the analyzis and strategies developed by the Indigenous movement to face the COVID-19 pandemic. Among other topics, she highlights some of the movement's strategies concerning communication, surveillance, and the monitoring of COVID-19, as well as its actions to support Indigenous territories, the initiatives carried out in the Legislative and Judiciary realms, the movement's international incidence, and its articulation with academia. Sonia shows the important role played by the Indigenous movement to control the health emergency and to defend the rights of the Indigenous peoples, in the framework of intense conflicts with the federal government and setbacks in public policies. Copyright © 2022, Associacao Brasileira de Pos - Graduacao em Saude Coletiva. All rights reserved.

12.
Animals (Basel) ; 12(20)2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071161

ABSTRACT

Older adults receiving long-term care at home (LTCH-clients) were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and its countermeasures. Previous research suggests that pets can mitigate some of the pandemic's impacts for older adults but results are contradictory. Our aim was to investigate experiences of LTCH-clients and the significance of their pets during the pandemic. Accounting for saturation, semi-structured interviews were conducted with five LTCH-clients and four family caregivers of LTCH-clients with dementia. Participants were asked about their experiences with COVID-19 and the significance of LTCH-clients' pets during the pandemic. Two researchers performed thematic analyses in ATLAS.ti using open coding and an iterative-inductive approach. All participants reported negative experiences as a result of COVID-19 countermeasures. Results suggested that caring for pets provided pet owners with structure, which may have contributed to a sense of stability and continuity. Our outcomes underlined an important role of pets for LTCH-clients both before and during the pandemic.

13.
Journal of Acute Disease ; 11(4):127-132, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066824

ABSTRACT

This narrative review aims to highlight some of the factors contributing to challenges faced by many countries in controlling the spread of COVID-19 pandemic that continues to rage around the world, especially after stoppage of official prevention and control activities. A literature search was conducted on PubMed, and Google using search terms 'COVID-19', 'challenges', 'prevention', and 'control' in different combinations. COVID-19 prevention and control challenges are related to health-system, vaccines, administration, and society culture. Controlling the spread of COVID-19 necessitates cooperation between community leaders, healthcare professionals, religious leaders, and the public.

14.
Pharmaceutical Journal ; 307(7953), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2065003
15.
Pharmaceutical Journal ; 306(7948), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064944
16.
International Journal of Stroke ; 17(1):14, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064665

ABSTRACT

Background: Access to rehabilitation services for Aboriginal people following acquired brain injury (ABI) is frequently hindered by challenges navigating: i) complex medical systems, ii) geographical distances from services and iii) culturally insecure service delivery. Healing Right Way is the first randomised control trial (RCT) to address these issues in partnership with multiple health service providers across Western Australia (WA). Aims: To outline the multicomponent Healing Right Way intervention by providing case studies, and describing challenges, facilitators and implications for rehabilitation services. Method: This stepped-wedge cluster RCT involved four metropolitan and four regional sites across WA. Aboriginal adults hospitalised for ABI were recruited from 2018-2021. Intervention components comprised ABI-related cultural security training (CST) for hospital staff, and employment of Aboriginal Brain Injury Coordinators (ABICs) to support ABI survivors for six months post-injury. The primary outcome was quality of life (measured with Euro QOL-5D-3L VAS) at 26 weeks. Secondary outcomes included participants' overall function and disability, anxiety and depression, carer strain, and changes to service delivery across the 26-week follow-up period. Detailed process and cost evaluations were also undertaken. Results: 108 participants were recruited from the participating sites. The CST was delivered across all eight participating hospitals with 250 hospital staff trained. ABICs supported 61 participants, 70% residing in regional, rural or remote areas. Challenges to implementation of the intervention included impacts from COVID-19 responses, hospital staff turnover and availability, recruitment of people with traumatic brain injury and methods for maintaining contact with participants and next-of-kin across locations. Collaboration with Aboriginal health providers and community networks were invaluable to maintaining contact with participants during follow-up, as was telehealth and research partnerships. Discussion/Conclusions: This landmark trial provides a novel multicomponent intervention in an underserviced population to inform muchneeded service improvements for Aboriginal people with ABI across metropolitan and rural settings.

17.
Chest ; 162(4):A2281, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060930

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Impact of Health Disparities and Differences SESSION TYPE: Rapid Fire Original Inv PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 11:15 am - 12:15 pm PURPOSE: To address rural healthcare disparities by providing access to home based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program for eligible veterans at the Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) who reside in remote areas or those with barriers of long travel time and transportation hardship. METHODS: The Pulmonary Section at the Salem VAMC received a grant from the Office of Rural Health to establish HBPR program for eligible veterans. Its goal was to improve quality of life and potentially reduce COPD hospitalizations and exacerbations (AECOPD). Under the direction of pulmonologists, the program was run by an exercise physiologist (EP). Referrals were received from inpatient and outpatient providers. After an initial in-person evaluation, weekly telehealth meetings (telephone, video) occurred over 12 weeks. Veterans were provided with the equipment, and an individualized targeted exercise program along with education and counseling on tobacco cessation, nutrition, oxygen compliance, stress management, medication adherence. Follow up appointments were scheduled at 3, 6 and 12 months post completion. RESULTS: Between September 2020 and January 2022, 312 consults were received, 206 consults were scheduled and 175 veterans enrolled. To date, 100 have completed the program with 24 ongoing. 30% declined service, citing: comorbidities, physical debility, difficulty remembering scheduled appointments, lack of motivation, social reasons, worsening health status. Mean age was 71, male predominance (95%). Referral diagnoses included: COPD (86%), chronic hypoxic respiratory failure (55%), COVID-19 (11%), Interstital Lung Diseases (10%). Mean FEV1 was 57% predicted, mean MMRC Dyspnea Scale 2.5, mean BODE score 5. 20% of enrolled veterans were active smokers, 72% were former smokers. 6 minute walk test increased from 156 meters on enrollment to 216 meters on completion. 45 veterans required hospitalization for pulmonary issues during their participation in the program. EP identified on weekly appointments 20 AECOPD that were treated as outpatient, 1 spontaneous pneumothorax that led to hospitalization, and facilitated the refill of inhalers or adjustment of medical regimen. Patient satisfaction score, including perception of benefit post completion was 29.4/30. CONCLUSIONS: HBPR at the Salem VAMC provided access to eligible veterans, overcoming barriers of rurality, transportation hardship and lack of nearby conventional programs. It also offered off business hours PR to veterans who continue to work. It allowed decrease in community care referrals thus establishing useful and cost effective service. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Pulmonary Rehabilitation has been shown to reduce morbidity, improve functional status and have mortality benefit. Healthcare discrepancies and disparities have been a major obstacle for enrollment. HBPR would address these issues and contribute to decreased health service utilization and costs. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Nathalie Abi Hatem No relevant relationships by Brittany Frost No relevant relationships by Mitchell Horowitz No relevant relationships by Deepa Lala

18.
Estudos Feministas ; 30(2), 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2039508

ABSTRACT

A partir de una investigación-acción-participativa que comenzó en 2019 en una zona segregada del partido de San Martin del Gran Buenos Aires, propongo analizar, por un lado, los efectos desiguales de la emergencia sanitaria del coronavirus —y las medidas tendientes a mitigarlas—, en mujeres migrantes desde una perspectiva interseccional. Por otro lado, pretendo examinar las estrategias de cuidados comunitarios que despliegan estas mujeres que son en su gran mayoría quienes, a partir de sus múltiples organizaciones y saberes, contienen la crisis en estos barrios populares y cubren, a partir de la creación y el fortalecimiento del trabajo en red, las diversas falencias de las medidas adoptadas desde distintos niveles del Estado. Se examinarán tanto los datos recopilados con anterioridad a la pandemia como también registros de observación y entrevistas realizadas de manera remota durante 2020Alternate : Com base numa pesquisa-ação-participativa que começou em 2019 em uma área segregada do distrito de San Martin da Grande Buenos Aires, proponho analisar, por um lado, os efeitos desiguais da emergência sanitária do coronavírus —e as medidas que visa mitigá-los—, em mulheres migrantes, a partir de uma perspectiva interseccional. Por outro lado, pretendo examinar as estratégias de cuidado comunitário implantadas por essas mulheres, cuja grande maioria, a partir de suas múltiplas organizações e saberes, contêm a crise nesses bairros populares e cobrem, pela criação e fortalecimento do trabalho em rede, as várias deficiências das medidas adotadas em diferentes níveis do Estado. Serão examinados tanto os dados coletados antes da pandemia quanto os registros de observação e entrevistas realizadas remotamente durante o ano de 2020.Alternate : Based on a participatory action research that began in 2019 in a segregated area of the San Martin district of Greater Buenos Aires, I propose to analyze, on the one hand, the unequal effects of the coronavirus health emergency —and the measures aimed at mitigating them —, in migrant women from an intersectional perspective. On the other hand, I intend to examine the community care strategies deployed by these women, who are mostly the ones who, from their multiple organizations and knowledge, contain the crisis in these popular neighborhoods and cover, creating and strengthening networking, the various shortcomings of the measures adopted from different levels of the State. Both data collected prior to the pandemic and registers of observation and interviews conducted remotely during 2020 will be examined.

19.
Health Soc Care Community ; 2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2037987

ABSTRACT

Research aimed at identifying and evaluating approaches to homelessness has predominately focused on strategies for supporting tenancy sustainment. Fewer studies focus on strategies for enabling thriving following homelessness, and the perspectives of service providers and organisational leaders (SPOL) on this topic are rare. We conducted this study in the context of a community-based participatory research project in two cities in Ontario, Canada. This research was aimed at identifying the strengths and challenges of existing supports in enabling thriving following homelessness, followed by co-designing a novel intervention alongside persons with lived experience of homelessness (PWLEH) and SPOL. The current study presents the findings of interviews conducted in 2020-2021 with SPOL in organisations serving PWLEH. We interviewed 60 individuals including service providers (n = 38; 63.3%) and organisational leaders (n = 22; 36.7%) using semi-structured qualitative interviews. Interviews were conducted and recorded on Zoom to align with physical distancing protocols associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed abductively informed by the lenses of social justice and health equity. The essence of our findings is represented by a quote from a research participant: 'We stick people in a house and say okay, you're housed. The problem is solved'. This essence was expressed through five themes: (1) stuck in a system that prevents thriving, (2) substance use as an important coping strategy that prevents tenancy sustainment and thriving, (3) the critical importance of targeting community integration following homelessness, (4) incorporating peer expertise as imperative and (5) people need to be afforded options in selecting housing and services following homelessness. Our findings indicate that SPOL envision possibilities of thriving following homelessness yet are embedded within a system that often prevents them from supporting individuals who are leaving homelessness to do so. Research, practice and policy implications are discussed.

20.
Social Sciences ; 11(8):366, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024070

ABSTRACT

The authors report findings from a 15-month project that focused on the experiences of sex workers who live and work in an Eastern Canadian province. As part of a larger multi-phased study, 15 adults who identified as women, transgender, or non-binary, and received money or goods for sexual services, participated in photo-elicitation interviews. Drawing on a critical framing analysis, findings indicated supports—as identified and experienced by sex workers—encompassed three categories of care: self, community, and collective. These categories are described, with a particular focus on the latter two. Continuing with the care-based framework, recommendations to structure interventions draw on the role of accountability care in identifying how best to operationalize policies that promote health, well-being, and dignity of Canadian sex workers. The paper begins with a brief overview of the Canadian context and the role of supports. It follows with a discussion on the materials and methods and the results. It concludes with recommendations, limitations, and future considerations.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL