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1.
Hokuriku Journal of Public Health ; JOUR(学会特集):8-18, 48.
Article in Japanese | Ichushi | ID: covidwho-2084296
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(11): e40977, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contact tracing is an important public health tool for curbing the spread of infectious diseases. Effective and efficient contact tracing involves the rapid identification of individuals with infection and their exposed contacts and ensuring their isolation or quarantine, respectively. Manual contact tracing via telephone call and digital proximity app technology have been key strategies in mitigating the spread of COVID-19. However, many people are not reached for COVID-19 contact tracing due to missing telephone numbers or nonresponse to telephone calls. The New York City COVID-19 Trace program augmented the efforts of telephone-based contact tracers with information gatherers (IGs) to search and obtain telephone numbers or residential addresses, and community engagement specialists (CESs) made home visits to individuals that were not contacted via telephone calls. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of information gathering and home visits to the yields of COVID-19 contact tracing in New York City. METHODS: IGs looked for phone numbers or addresses when records were missing phone numbers to locate case-patients or contacts. CESs made home visits to case-patients and contacts with no phone numbers or those who were not reached by telephone-based tracers. Contact tracing management software was used to triage and queue assignments for the telephone-based tracers, IGs, and CESs. We measured the outcomes of contact tracing-related tasks performed by the IGs and CESs from July 2020 to June 2021. RESULTS: Of 659,484 cases and 861,566 contact records in the Trace system, 28% (185,485) of cases and 35% (303,550) of contacts were referred to IGs. IGs obtained new phone numbers for 33% (61,804) of case-patients and 11% (31,951) of contacts; 50% (31,019) of the case-patients and 46% (14,604) of the contacts with new phone numbers completed interviews; 25% (167,815) of case-patients and 8% (72,437) of contacts were referred to CESs. CESs attempted 80% (132,781) of case and 69% (49,846) of contact investigations, of which 47% (62,733) and 50% (25,015) respectively, completed interviews. An additional 12,192 contacts were identified following IG investigations and 13,507 following CES interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Gathering new or missing locating information and making home visits increased the number of case-patients and contacts interviewed for contact tracing and resulted in additional contacts. When possible, contact tracing programs should add information gathering and home visiting strategies to increase COVID-19 contact tracing coverage and yields as well as promote equity in the delivery of this public health intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Humans , Contact Tracing/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quarantine , Telephone , Public Health
3.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1935, 2022 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community Heart Health Actions for Latinos at Risk (CHARLAR) is a promotora-led cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk-reduction program for socio-demographically disadvantaged Latinos and consists of 11 skill-building sessions. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to worsening health status in U.S. adults and necessitated transition to virtual implementation of the CHARLAR program. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate virtual delivery of CHARLAR. Changes in health behaviors were assessed through a pre/post program survey. Results from virtual and historical (in-person delivery) were compared. Key informant interviews were conducted with promotoras and randomly selected participants and then coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. RESULTS: An increase in days of exercise per week (+ 1.52), daily servings of fruit (+ 0.60) and vegetables (+ 0.56), and self-reported general health (+ 0.38), were observed in the virtual cohort [all p < 0.05]. A numeric decrease in PHQ-8 (-1.07 p = 0.067) was also noted. The historical cohort showed similar improvements from baseline in days of exercise per week (+ 0.91), daily servings of fruit (+ 0.244) and vegetables (+ 0.282), and PHQ-8 (-1.89) [all p < 0.05]. Qualitative interviews revealed that the online format provided valuable tools supporting positive behavior change. Despite initial discomfort and technical challenges, promotoras and participants adapted and deepened valued relationships through additional virtual support. CONCLUSION: Improved health behaviors and CVD risk factors were successfully maintained through virtual delivery of the CHARLAR program. Optimization of virtual health programs like CHARLAR has the potential to increase reach and improve CVD risk among Latinos.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Health Promotion/methods , Hispanic or Latino , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control
4.
Public Health Nurs ; 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078651

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine how the COVID-19 Project ECHO program may have influenced the mental health of community health workers (CHWs) from South Texas. The program was designed around case-based learning and mentorship to provide support to CHWs and help them gain expertise to provide services to their communities. DESIGN: An explanatory sequential mixed methods pilot study. SAMPLE: Fifteen CHWs who were enrolled in the program participated in this study. MEASUREMENTS: The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) were used to measure the differences pre- and post-intervention. Qualitative description was used to explore the experiences of the participating CHWs. RESULTS: The PSS post-test mean (12.53) showed a statistically significant decrease from the pretest mean (17.01) (t (14 = 2.456, p = .028). The CHWs explained that the death of loved ones, feelings of isolation, and work-related concerns influenced their mental health. CHWs expressed that the program provided them with emotional support and resources for their clients. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on disadvantaged and medically underserved areas will be long-lasting; therefore, the need is greater than ever for CHWs to receive mental health support and be able to connect communities with vital resources.

5.
J Public Health Dent ; 2022 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Teledentistry helped dentistry adapt to pandemic-era challenges; little is known about dental professionals' teledentistry experiences during this time. This analysis sought to understand professionals' pandemic teledentistry experiences and expectations for the modality's future. METHODS: We conducted virtual individual interviews (n = 21) via Zoom to understand how federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) delivered oral care during the first year of the pandemic, including but not limited to the use of teledentistry. We independently coded each transcript, then identified themes and sub-themes. RESULTS: We identified three major themes: (1) Logistical and equity considerations shaped teledentistry's adoption; (2) Team-based factors influenced implementation; and (3) Teledentistry's future is as-yet undetermined. CONCLUSIONS: Experiences with teledentistry during the first year of COVID-19 varied substantially. Future directions should be more deliberate to counter the urgency of pandemic-style implementation and must address appropriate use, reimbursement guidance, patient and provider challenges, and customizability to each clinic's context.

6.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(10): e38949, 2022 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074602

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the widespread and concerted efforts to propagate health misinformation on social media, particularly centered around vaccination during the pandemic, many groups of clinicians and scientists were organized on social media to tackle misinformation and promote vaccination, using a national or international lens. Although documenting the impact of such social media efforts, particularly at the community level, can be challenging, a more hyperlocal or "place-based approach" for social media campaigns could be effective in tackling misinformation and improving public health outcomes at a community level. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe and document the effectiveness of a place-based strategy for a coordinated group of Chicago health care workers on social media to tackle misinformation and improve vaccination rates in the communities they serve. METHODS: The Illinois Medical Professionals Action Collaborative Team (IMPACT) was founded in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, with representatives from major academic teaching hospitals in Chicago (eg, University of Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Illinois, and Rush University) and community-based organizations. Through crowdsourcing on multiple social media platforms (eg, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram) with a place-based approach, IMPACT engaged grassroots networks of thousands of Illinois health care workers and the public to identify gaps, needs, and viewpoints to improve local health care delivery during the pandemic. RESULTS: To address vaccine misinformation, IMPACT created 8 "myth debunking" infographics and a "vaccine information series" of 14 infographics that have generated >340,000 impressions and informed the development of vaccine education for the Chicago Public Libraries. IMPACT delivered 13 policy letters focusing on different topics, such as health care worker personal protective equipment, universal masking, and vaccination, with >4000 health care workers signatures collected through social media and delivered to policy makers; it published over 50 op-eds on COVID-19 topics in high-impact news outlets and contributed to >200 local and national news features. Using the crowdsourcing approach on IMPACT social media channels, IMPACT mobilized health care and lay volunteers to staff >400 vaccine events for >120,000 individuals, many in Chicago's hardest-hit neighborhoods. The group's recommendations have influenced public health awareness campaigns and initiatives, as well as research, advocacy, and policy recommendations, and they have been recognized with local and national awards. CONCLUSIONS: A coordinated group of health care workers on social media, using a hyperlocal place-based approach, can not only work together to address misinformation but also collaborate to boost vaccination rates in their surrounding communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Power, Psychological , Trust , Vaccination
7.
Midwifery ; 116: 103516, 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069491

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the value of training for health professionals for improving their ability to effectively refer postnatal women to a targeted community physical activity programme. The study also sought to understand challenges to effective referral of postnatal women from deprived areas. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted in January-February 2020 with early years practitioners (n = 4), health visitors (n = 1) and community midwives (n = 2) who had participated in a training workshop implemented as part of a targeted community physical activity referral programme for postnatal women from deprived areas in the North East of England. Two follow up interviews were also conducted with one midwife and one early years practitioner during the Covid-19 pandemic. Data were analysed thematically and the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, Behaviour (COM-B) model was employed to facilitate identification of the impact of training and the challenges in referral from the health professionals' perspective. FINDINGS: The training increased capability to refer by improving knowledge and confidence of health professionals in being able to give appropriate guidance to postnatal women about physical activity without having to refer to other professionals. Health professionals reported adequate opportunities to engage with postnatal women, were motivated to refer and perceived this to be part of their role. The timing and method of message delivery were key contexts for perceived successful referral, particularly for midwives who wanted to ensure the messaging began in the antenatal period. Low staffing levels, limited interprofessional collaboration and finding strategies to engage women from deprived areas were key challenges to effective delivery of physical activity messages. These challenges were exacerbated during Covid-19, with increased mental health issues amongst postnatal women. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Training health professionals for physical activity messaging can be a useful way to increase capability, opportunity, and motivation to refer to physical activity interventions for postnatal women in deprived areas to potentially increase physical wellbeing and reduce postnatal depression. The COM-B is a relevant framework to underpin training. A clearly identified referral pathway and staffing issues need to be addressed to improve referrals by health professionals.

10.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(4)2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064174

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The 500 community hospitals in the UK provide a range of services to their communities. The response of these small, mainly rural, hospitals to the COVID-19 pandemic has not yet been examined and so this study sought to address this gap. METHOD: Appreciative inquiry was used to understand staff perspectives of how community hospitals responded to the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. A total of 20 organisations participated, representing 168 (34%) community hospitals in the UK. Qualitative interviews were conducted, with a total of 85 staff members, using an online video platform. 30 case studies were developed from these interviews. RESULTS: Staff described positive changes that were made in the context of the fear and uncertainty experienced in the pandemic. Quality improvements were reported in a wide range of services and models of care such as the use of the inpatient beds, and the access and management of urgent care services. Rapid changes were made in the way that services were managed, such as communications and leadership. Programmes of accelerated training were offered for existing and redeployed staff. Attention to staff health and well-being was a feature and there were a variety of innovations designed to support patients and their families. The impact of the changes was viewed as strengthening of integrated working between staff and sectors, the ability to rapidly innovate and improve quality, and the scope to use local decision-making to make changes. CONCLUSION: Staff of community hospitals described innovative and rapid quality improvements in their community hospitals in response to the pandemic. The case studies illustrated the features of community hospitals, showing that they can be resilient, flexible, responsive, creative, compassionate and integrated. The case studies of quality improvements are being used to encourage sharing and learning across community hospitals and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
11.
CAB Abstracts; 2022.
Preprint in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: ppcovidwho-345451

ABSTRACT

Background: Over 50 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed globally as of November 2020. Evidence is rapidly emerging on the epidemiology of COVID-19, and its impact on individuals and potential burden on health services and society. Between 10-35% of people with COVID-19 may experience post-acute long Covid. This currently equates to between 8,129 and 28,453 people in Scotland. Some of these people will require rehabilitation to support their recovery. Currently, we do not know how to optimally configure community rehabilitation services for people with long Covid.

12.
Nursing Management (2014+) ; 29(5):10-11, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2056277

ABSTRACT

More than 170,000 written complaints were made about patient care last year (2020-21) in England alone, according to NHS statistics. Of the complaints about a specific profession in hospital and community care, 26% related to nurses. This figure is likely to be lower than it should be due to changes during COVID-19 that meant not all data needed to be recorded as normal.

13.
Kans J Med ; 15: 307-310, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056592

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telemedicine has been of heightened focus due to spikes in usage during the COVID-19 pandemic. Disparities in health care may affect patient satisfaction with this resource depending on factors such as patient race, age, or socioeconomic background. The purpose of this study was to analyze patient satisfaction with teledermatology to identify any differences in satisfaction based on race, age, and income during the COVID-19 pandemic period. Methods: A 21-question, IRB-approved survey was administered to patients at two academic dermatology clinics in Kansas City. Patient satisfaction was measured using a five-point Likert scale. Results: A total of 64 completed surveys were analyzed (17.8% response rate). Most of the participants were female (n = 48, 75%), age 45 to 60 (n = 17, 26.6%), and reported White for race (n = 55, 85.9%). Overall, 73.4% (n = 47) of patients reported being satisfied with their visit. However, only 38.7% (n = 24) of participants were likely to choose a video over an in-person visit. Reasons for low patient satisfaction included concerns regarding ability to perform an accurate physical exam with a video visit (n = 9, 14.1%), receiving inadequate care (n = 4, 6.3%), protected privacy (n = 3, 4.7%), and provider understanding the patient (n = 2, 3.1%). Conclusions: Our findings were similar to prior studies stating no difference in patient satisfaction with regards to age, income, or race and patients reporting high satisfaction with teledermatology appointments despite a preference for in-person dermatology visits. Future studies with a larger diverse cohort of participants are needed to elucidate and address possible disparities associated with teledermatology use.

14.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(9): e37965, 2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Implementing community health nursing programs is a new field of application in the primary health sector of Germany. Hence, there is limited evidence of effective community-based and nurse-led interventions with regard to the German health care system. International research findings are mostly not transferable. The Community Health Nursing in der Stadt (CoSta; ie, "Community Health Nursing in the City") project is the first study that examines a community health nurse-led intervention for adults with chronic health conditions. OBJECTIVE: This study protocol describes the design and methods of a randomized controlled field trial that will investigate if a community health nurse-based intervention has an impact on health-related quality of life in adults with chronic conditions. METHODS: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial that will be conducted under real-life conditions in the field. In a 4-month period, patients with at least 1 chronic International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, diagnosis will be enrolled. Participants will be randomly allocated to an intervention group or a control group. The sample size was assumed based on an effect size of 0.50 with a significance level of .05, using a 2-sided (2-tailed), 2-sample unequal variance t test. The control group will be treated as usual. The intervention group will receive-in addition to the usual treatment-preventive home visits; consultations; and educative training, which will be offered by 2 community health nurses for up to 12 months. Both groups will be followed up at baseline, after 6 months, and after 12 months. The primary outcome measure is the mental component summary score from the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey after 12-months. Secondary patient outcomes will be included. The study received ethics approval from the Competence Health Center's institutional review board at the University of Applied Sciences Hamburg (procedure number: 2020-14). RESULTS: The CoSta project was funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research Germany (contract number: 13FH019SX8). In total, 187 participants were recruited at the beginning of August 2021. Further, 92 were excluded and 94 were randomized. Data collection will be conducted until the end of 2022. CONCLUSIONS: Our study will provide data with regard to the effectiveness of community nurse-led interventions that focus on the treatment of vulnerable adults with chronic health conditions in a community health center. In secondary analyses, the associations among influencing social factors (education, income, and employment) will be examined. We expect results that will help reduce the research-to-practice gap. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00026164; https://tinyurl.com/yckxc5ut. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/37965.

15.
Trials ; 23(1): 841, 2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) programs have struggled to deliver sustainable, effective support for adults with diabetes (AWDs) to improve self-management behaviors, achieve glycemic goals, and reduce risk for complications. One largely untapped resource for this support is AWDs' social networks. Fifty to 75% of AWDs have an unpaid family member or friend ("support person") who provides ongoing help with diabetes management. However, DSMES interventions to date lack structured and effective approaches to directly engage support persons in AWDs' diabetes management. METHODS: This parallel arm randomized trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of Family Support for Health Action (FAM-ACT), a novel community health worker (CHW)-delivered program focused on educating and supporting patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their support persons (SPs), relative to an established, CHW-delivered, individual patient-focused DSMES and care management (I-DSMES) intervention. Both interventions were developed using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach. The study will be conducted in partnership with an urban Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) serving a low-income, Latino/a community, with target enrollment of 268 dyads consisting of an FQHC patient with T2D with high HbA1c and an SP. Patient-SP dyads will be randomized to receive FAM-ACT or I-DSMES over 6 months. The primary outcome is change in patient HbA1c from baseline to 6 months. Secondary patient outcomes include 12-month change in HbA1c, changes in patient blood pressure, diabetes self-management behaviors, diabetes distress, patient activation, diabetes self-efficacy, and perceptions of and satisfaction with SP support for diabetes. Secondary SP outcomes include self-efficacy for helping the patient with diabetes management and SP distress about the patient's diabetes. We also will assess the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient's ability to manage diabetes. DISCUSSION: This study will inform scalable, evidence-based approaches that leverage family support to help AWDs improve and sustain self-management strategies that underpin optimal management of multiple diabetes complication risk factors. The protocol is designed for and evaluated with a low-income and predominantly Latino/a community, which may increase applicability to other similar communities. The COVID-19 pandemic presented several challenges to study protocol and intervention delivery; modifications made to address these challenges are described. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03812614. Registered on 18 January 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Adult , Community Health Workers , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
16.
Health Soc Care Community ; 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052488

ABSTRACT

In Australia, mental illness has been recognised as a National Health Priority area, with the coronavirus pandemic adding a layer of urgency to the need to address the multiple health problems faced by clients with mental illnesses. Whilst much has been done in efforts to support these clients, little is known about their medication knowledge and experience with health professionals. The aim of the study was to explore the knowledge and beliefs of clients on the use of psychotropic medications and study their experiences with healthcare providers. Adult participants at a not-for-profit community-managed specialist mental health service provider in Adelaide, South Australia were recruited. Four focus group sessions were conducted between February 2020 and March 2021. All sessions were co-facilitated by a peer practitioner with lived experience. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Participants (n = 27) reported that provision of medication education was inadequate and, in some cases, non-existent. There was an apparent lack of support for monitoring and managing common side effects, such as weight gain. Participants described not being involved in any decision-making processes and that establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship with their healthcare providers was challenging. Perceived stigma remains a barrier in accessing healthcare. Despite participants regularly interacting with a range of healthcare providers, findings highlight key gaps in care, particularly medication education and establishing a therapeutic relationship with their healthcare providers. Future mental health reforms should consider the provision of additional medication education in community settings, such as at not-for-profit organisations. Moreover, healthcare providers should take a proactive approach in establishing therapeutic relationships.

17.
Mental Health in a Digital World ; : 459-479, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2048737

ABSTRACT

This chapter describes the rapid spread of digital mental health technologies across the world and further explores specific case studies in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). We are increasingly seeing rapid rates of technological innovation and adaptation in low-resource settings including the widespread use of smartphone mobile devices, apps and web-based platforms. Health-care settings have taken advantage of this growth and are maximizing its potential by introducing these technologies in their service delivery. These technologies have been applied to various settings such as training of health workers, screening patients, and care delivery. This chapter explores five major areas benefitting from these emerging technologies: (1) community outreach, challenging stigma, and spreading awareness, (2) youth mental health, (3) mental health in humanitarian settings, (4) clinical care and frontline health workers, and (5) technology for severe mental disorders. We close the chapter with a discussion of broad ethical considerations in LMICs, highlighting risks pertaining to misinformation, victimization, and widening health inequities. Finally, we emphasize the role of digital technologies during the COVID-19 pandemic in addressing the potential rise and exacerbation of mental health problems, and how these technologies can potentially be leveraged to alleviate this burden through the remote provision of essential mental health services. © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

18.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-4, 2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050173

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 Pandemic has exacerbated the already worsening opioid epidemic within the United States. With a continuing increase in opioid overdose deaths, measures are needed to halt the needless number of deaths and begin on a path of recovery to address all the factors that impact the epidemic. The CDC has provided various recommendations to combat the increases in opioid overdose deaths. These recommendations have included expanded distribution and use of naloxone and overdose prevention education as essential services for people most at risk of overdose. While strategies should include the increase in community resources for those with opioid disorder and shifting the perspectives of healthcare to view opioid disorder as a chronic illness that can be treated with medication such as buprenorphine, these methods are not immediate enough to stop the trend in deaths. The United States must take immediate action to expand access to and use of Naloxone for the public and first responders. Naloxone alone cannot address the magnitude of this epidemic, but it is an essential first step in preventing immediate death while a multimodal strategy is enacted to fully protect those most at risk.

19.
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research (Online) ; 29(2):126-154, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2047019

ABSTRACT

This paper presents how a community mobilization program to prevent suicide was adapted to an online format to accommodate the impossibility of in-person delivery in Alaska Native communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The intervention, Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES), was created collaboratively by researchers and Alaska Native communities with the goal of bringing community members together to create research-informed and community-led suicide prevention activities in their communities. To continue our work during the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions, we adapted the PC CARES model to a synchronous remote delivery format. This shift included moving from predominantly Alaska Native participants to one of a mainly non-Native school staff audience. This required a pivot from Alaska Native self-determination toward cultural humility and community collaboration for school-based staff, with multilevel youth suicide prevention remaining the primary aim. This reorientation can offer important insight into how to build more responsive programs for those who are not from the communities they serve. Here, we provide a narrative overview of our collaborative adaptation process, illustrated by data collected during synchronous remote facilitation of the program, and reflect on how the shift in format and audience impacted program delivery and content. The adaptation process strove to maintain the core animating features of self-determination for Alaska Native communities and people as well as the translation of scientific knowledge to practice for greater impact.

20.
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar ; 51(3), 2022.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046475

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Reproductive health is considered a general state of physical, mental and social well-being, and not the mere absence of diseases or ailments in all aspects related to the reproductive system, its functions and processes;COVID-19 has the potential to significantly affect them. Objective: Search and describe how COVID-19 can affect reproductive health. Development: SARS-CoV-2, the COVID-19 virus, is capable of infecting cells that express the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in their cytoplasmic membrane;various tissues of the male and female reproductive system have this enzyme and are therefore susceptible to infection, a fact that has not been demonstrated in all these tissues. Sexual behavior has been altered by psychological and other factors related to prolonged isolation. The disease has also had a negative social impact, making it difficult to access community health institutions. Conclusions: COVID-19 is capable of damaging the reproductive organs in different ways, although some are still uncertain. Psychologically affects people, and also sexual and reproductive health care services, and this has serious consequences such as abortions, decreased fertility, pregnancy-related deaths, among others. © 2022, Editorial Ciencias Medicas. All rights reserved.

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