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1.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 145-147, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888302

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 635-637. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-015.) This letter recommends the following policy strategies to enable the shift toward home care. First, efforts should be made to keep older persons healthy at home as long as possible, for example, by collaborating with primary health-care providers such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to provide appropriate medical services. Next, given that the transmission risk is particularly high between people in close contact, it is necessary to employ technological aids and minimize face-to-face contact. Finally, considering the potential for outbreaks based in adult daycare centers, which offer social and recreation services for older adults staying in their own communities, these centers should require staff and users to adhere to hygiene rules such as washing hands thoroughly, wearing masks, and keeping distance from one another. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 195-200, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888271

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 682-687. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2020-48212-001.) This paper aims to provide an overview of all aggregate responses of society to support older people to fight the COVID-19 in Vietnam, a country that has done a good process of preventing diseases by limited resources. I introduce a model of social responses that systematizing the activities of government, socio-political organizations, entrepreneurs and private sponsors to older people. The success of Vietnam is remarkable and can be a good lesson for countries (especially those with limited resources) in building effective models in caring for older people in a pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
Chemistry World ; 18(10):64-65, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1888265
4.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 152-153, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888187

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 642-643. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-017.) A nursing home resident and nursing home advocate, describes her personal experience and perspectives about living in a nursing home in Massachusetts, USA during the COVID-19 pandemic. She feels strongly that the money for long-term care reimbursements should be put into the hands of individuals and families to give them the choice of where to get needed services and supports. The importance of having the choice to be able to receive home and community-based services, to be included in the community has been highlighted by the dangerousness of living in crowded institutions during a contagious pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 217-220, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888118

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 702-705. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-030.) In this letter, we present a case for why and how social workers who work with older adults should assess and respond to human-pet interaction;while important on a routine basis, given the current pandemic situation and subsequent increases in isolation experienced by older adults, it is especially crucial to be responsive to their relationships with pets as potential strengths, stressors or both. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

6.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : xxii, 249, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888105

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus and the resultant COVID-19 pandemic have disproportionately affected older adults in terms of the number of lives lost, concerns about the safety of institutional and home and community-based care, the impact of isolation and seclusion, and the ability to participate and engage in meaningful and contributory activities. The pandemic has uncovered layers of ageism that are embedded in societies globally and challenges us all to address the pervasive individual, institutional, and structural biases that permit age based discrimination. Within the interdisciplinary field of gerontology, social workers lead organizations, provide direct services and supports, facilitate community engagement and participation, and deliver therapeutic interventions among other roles and activities that facilitate positive outcomes for older adults and their families. In Gerontological Social Work and COVID-19: Calls for Change in Education, Practice, and Policy from International Voices, scholars, practice professionals, and other stakeholders reflect on the initial months of the pandemic. They articulate immediate needs the pandemic has created and uncovered, and further identify directions the field must go in to meet the moment and prepare for the future ahead. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Australasian Drama Studies ; - (80):1-6, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1888101

ABSTRACT

[...]to the ferocity expressed in Hyland's production, Adriann Smith interprets the dissonance and distance inherent in key definitions of dramatic irony through an analysis of the works of three New Zealand artists: the songs of Andrew London, the play Home Land (Gary Henderson, 2005) and the opera Bitter Calm (Stuart Hoar, 1993). While acknowledging that these projects were, in part, a pragmatic response to diminishing on-campus resources, they present a compelling argument for the capacity of site-specific and site-responsive performance to embed student experience in their local communities. Demonstrating similar concerns with both the participation and representation of community in a regional Australian context, Vahri McKenzie offers a critical appraisal of the development of a process from which emerged a production of Euripides' The Bacchae (here renamed Bakkhai), in collaboration with an ensemble of professional and emerging artists and community members in Bunbury, Western Australia.

8.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 105-108, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888076

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 598-601. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2020-57957-001.) The invisible but deleterious impact of COVID-19 on health increases previously accumulated health disparities among older adults. Compared to hearing older adults, deaf older adults and older adults with hearing loss may be at higher risk for adverse COVID-related outcomes. This may be largely due to the intersection of low health literacy and knowledge about COVID-19, lack of access to public information regarding COVID-19, higher prevalence of chronic diseases, unintended negative consequences of using masks, and inaccessible health-care services (including COVID-19 testing). Therefore, social workers should develop and implement efficacious interventions aimed at reducing adverse COVID-19 outcomes in Deaf older adults and older adults with hearing loss. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 148-151, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888065

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 638-641. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-016.) A well-supported and appropriately equipped social worker is essential for reducing the damaging impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on older persons with dementia in Nigeria. It is also imperative for government and nongovernment organizations to redress the pending social needs of older persons with dementia such as the provision of psychosocial support delivered by social workers including meditation exercise delivered through electronic platforms and behavioral management supported through the telephone hotlines. Distress helplines can be established to serve older persons with dementia experiencing abuse. Individuals with parents that have dementia are encouraged to spend more time with them by taking up some caregiving duties while professional carers get some respite time for themselves. Meeting the care needs of older persons with dementia during the pandemic is an integral part of the fulfillment of fundamental human rights of the new United Nations Convention. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 69-73, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888026

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work , 2020, 63[6-7], 565-569. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2020-42553-001.) COVID-19 has ravaged through the lives of individuals, families, communities, and societies and, in the process, exacerbated existing vulnerabilities, oppression, and poverty among our most at-risk community members. Social workers, guided by values and ethics, are counteracting these ailments in society, concentrating on protecting the most vulnerable, older adults. In this letter we describe the impact of COVID-19 on older adults, note social work values from the National Association of Social Workers, and expand on the current role of the practicing social worker values in action during COVID. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

11.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 209-210, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888025

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 694-695. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-028.) Comments on an article by N. Kusmaul et al. (see record 2018-49264-004). Kusmaul et al. explained that one role of gerontological social workers in disaster preparedness and response is to identify unique needs, risk factors, and strengths possessed by older adults during periods of disaster. We would like to describe how a developing study of ours strives to understand these characteristics as they pertain to the "oldest old"-that is, adults ages 85 and over-in the midst of the disaster spurred by the current global spread of COVID-19. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 102-104, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1888009

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 595-597. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-011.) The COVID-19 pandemic affects all of us, but consequences are more serious for those who are older or have chronic conditions and immune disorders. Places where numbers of people are living together, such as in nursing homes, have also proven to be particularly vulnerable. People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) frequently present with the same risk factors but are largely forgotten in the care, response, and policy discussion. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

13.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 135-138, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887993

ABSTRACT

This chapter article originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 625-628. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2020-46962-001.) During the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing homes and assisted living facilities have accounted for over 20% of all infections, adult day care and other congregate sites have closed, and traditional home care agencies are facing staff shortages. In this environment, self-direction of home and community-based services, where the participant can hire their own staff and manage a budget that can be used for a broad range of goods and services including home modifications and assistive devices, is seen as a promising intervention. Using self-direction participants can minimize the number of people who enter their homes and pay close family and friends who were already providing many hours of informal care, and now may be unemployed. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is encouraging this approach. This commentary presents information on how states have responded using the new CMS Toolkit by expanding who can be a paid caregiver, increasing budgets and broadening the kinds of items that can be purchased with budgets to include items like personal protective equipment and supports for telehealth. This Commentary concludes with policy and research questions regarding how the delivery of long-term services and supports (LTSS) may change as the world returns to"normal". (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

14.
The Australian Journal of Emergency Management ; 35(4):10-11, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1887987

ABSTRACT

Reducing risk using community-based and place-based approaches addresses problems that are specific to a location or a community.

15.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 43-53, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887959

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 542-552. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2020-41235-001.) The COVID-19 pandemic, which is especially dangerous to older people, has disrupted the lives of older people and their family caregivers. This commentary outlines the adaptive and emerging practices in formal supportive services for family caregivers, the changing types of support that family caregivers are providing to their older relatives, and the ways family caregivers are seeking informal caregiving support during the COVID-19 outbreak. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 63-68, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887950

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 559-564. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-004.) Gerontological social workers should pay extra attention to disadvantaged older adults, guided by the social determinants of health (SDH) conceptual framework. Vulnerable older adults include those who live in poverty, with a disability, and in social isolation. This letter provides background information on the SDH framework, identifies issues of heightened inequality, and offers recommendations on how our profession can support older adults experiencing additional disadvantages during the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

17.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 161-163, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887932

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 651-653. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-020.) This letter highlights a few of the many the challenges facing nursing home social services workers and departments during COVID-19. We share them as the challenges, sacrifices, and important work of this professional group was largely unnoticed by the media and may not be widely known even within the social work field. Our group's activities also highlight the ways that researchers can support our practice colleagues at this difficult time, amplify their everyday efforts, and contribute to healing during this pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

18.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 114-117, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887872

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63[6-7], 607-610. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-012.) The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the Novel Corona Virus (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic on March 11 of this year (WHO, 2020). In the time since, it has become clear that the virus carries the greatest risk for older individuals and those living with ongoing medical conditions. As a result of a lifetime of discrimination due to who they love and how they identify, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and samegender-loving (LGBTQ+/SGL) older adults are more likely to experience risk factors associated with serious illness and poor outcomes related to COVID19. It is also not the first time they have encountered a pandemic that threatened their communities and comparisons between the AIDS crisis and COVID-19 have emerged in recent news. Against the backdrop of the pandemic, associated societal ageism and continued social distancing, Black Lives Matter protests broke out across the U.S. 2 months after WHO's declaration, sparked by police brutality targeting Black and African American communities in the wake of George Floyd's death. These two contemporaneous and ongoing social issues have illuminated existing disparities in life, health, and opportunity as well as the insidious and interlocking social causes of these injustices. In light of this unprecedented moment, we find ourselves taking stock and asking what it means to serve LGBTQ+/SGL elders in the context of COVID-19, across intersections of identity and interlocking dimensions of research, policy, and practice. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

19.
Gerontological social work and COVID-19: Calls for change in education, practice, and policy from international voices ; : 81-83, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1887822

ABSTRACT

This reprinted chapter originally appeared in Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2020, 63 [6-7], 577-579. (The following of the original article appeared in record 2021-00510-007.) The current global health crisis provides opportunity to reflect on prior social work responses to prior pandemic situations and serves to inform future research and practice for vulnerable older adults. This article discusses how the influenza pandemic of 1918, HIV/AIDS, and SARS elucidate the gravity of pandemics similar to COVID-19. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

20.
The Australian Journal of Emergency Management ; 35(2):4, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1887795

ABSTRACT

Health experts have, for many decades, urged governments to take the threat seriously and the H5N1, H1N1, SARS and MERS outbreaks in the years preceding the pandemic should have increased the sense of urgency. A long-term, well-funded global plan was needed to reduce pandemic risk. Instead government funding was incremental and short-lived, triggered by the earlier novel disease outbreaks and fading as the crises caused by them subsided.

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