Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
Journal of Professional Nursing ; 41:100-107, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821456

ABSTRACT

Background Major disruptions to higher education during COVID-19 resulted in a rapid shift to online learning and associated adaptations to teaching and assessment practices, including for postgraduate programs requiring practical skill development such as nursing and midwifery. Educator perspectives of this transition have not been widely studied. Purpose This qualitative descriptive study aimed to describe Australian postgraduate Maternal, Child and Family Health nurse educators' perceptions of COVID-19 impacts on student knowledge of theory and practice, and lessons learned through their responses. Method Semi-structured interviews were reflexively thematically analyzed. Results All participants recognized struggles, opportunities and innovations within three key themes: “We've learned how to be flexible”: Grappling with COVID-safe teaching and assessment;“Chat rooms and Zoomland”: Learning in a virtual community;and “We've had a few struggles”: Clinical placement tensions. Educators described a sense of uncertainty, increased flexibility, opportunities for change and new ways of connecting. They adapted by developing new online resources and broadening clinical practicum and assessment requirements to address new practice approaches including telehealth. Conclusions Rapidly changing practice requirements and concerns about risk of disease transfer between workplace and placement venues restricted placement opportunities. Educators learned and incorporated new skills and strategies into their teaching, while aiming to meet professional expectations and maintain quality of education. Some strategies are likely to be maintained for future education programs.

2.
Qatar Medical Journal ; 2022(2):1-3, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1811104

ABSTRACT

The hesitancy in taking COVID-19 vaccines is a complex process influenced by several factors, including individual, social, and cultural. Health literacy and community awareness around mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are critical for successfully combating the pandemic. Healthcare professionals, including family physicians and nurses, can help increase community awareness and mitigate some misconceptions and hesitancy regarding mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in people's attitudes. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to explore how the interaction between an individual's social identities such as gender, ethnicity, culture, knowledge, and belief impact their hesitancy and attitudes toward mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. We aimed to describe our experience in dealing with people residing in Qatar from the perspective of healthcare practitioners from the Qatar University Health Center during the period when mRNA COVID-19 vaccines was introduced in a time frame of 6 months (April to October, 2021). We identified several factors associated with the reluctance to receive mRNA COVID-19 vaccines once vaccination services were available, affordable, and accessible to everyone in Qatar (). Most individuals were hesitant and refused to take mRNA COVID-19 vaccines owing to the unjustified myths and fear about potential side effects of vaccines in general and unknown long-term effects of vaccination, especially among women who were uneducated. We believe we have been able to put forth a fair, unbiased, and balanced argument between an individual's right to take or refuse the vaccine and the overall benefits to the public and community health in terms of the overall community immunity when the vast majority of the population will be vaccinated. Our experience could assist in developing culturally sensitive and tailored community outreach programs to increase community awareness as it is the cornerstone on which public health can fight the irrational myths, fear, misconceptions, vaccine hesitancy, and improve vaccination coverages. Moreover, our shared experiences might be able to better prepare future launching of pandemic vaccination campaigns in order to minimize vaccine hesitancy. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Qatar Medical Journal is the property of Hamad bin Khalifa University Press (HBKU Press) and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

3.
Journal of Community Nursing ; 36(2):8-12, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1801153
4.
Public Health Nurs ; 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769760

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in major disruption to economic, health, education, and social systems. Families with preschool children experienced extraordinary strain during this time. This paper describes a qualitative study examining the experience of parents of preschool children in Hawaii during the COVID-19 pandemic. SAMPLE: Thirteen (N = 13) parents of preschool children living on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, participated in small group discussions occurring in February and March 2021, approximately 1 year after the start of the pandemic in the state. Discussion transcripts were coded and sorted into themes. RESULTS: Four themes emerged: stressors due to the COVID-19 pandemic, family coping and resources, meaning of the COVID-19 crisis to the family, and family adaptation patterns. Themes mapped to the Family Adjustment and Adaptation Response model. CONCLUSION: Families relied on various resources to cope with stressors experienced due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and adopted new patterns related to seeking healthcare and household emergency preparedness. Findings may inform policies and interventions to support families during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and future public health emergencies.

5.
Int J Community Based Nurs Midwifery ; 10(2): 96-109, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754212

ABSTRACT

Background: The majority of Covid-19 cases occur at the community level requiring health services to be available at the primary health care level, which also includes Community Health Nursing (CHN) services. It is important to understand various perspectives of the parties involved, effective solutions, and strategies used by nurses in managing Covid-19 in order to be able to provide these services. The purpose of this study was to explore the community health nurses' (CHNs) roles in the Covid-19 management in Indonesia. Methods: A qualitative method was used to explore the perspective from nurses and health cadres as participants. Data were collected through in-depth phone interviews with 11 participants from December 2020 to February 2021 in Bandung. Data were analyzed manually using thematic analysis. Results: Five themes were extracted in this study, namely providing comprehensive services by CHNs; utilizing technology to bridge the information needs; implementing family nursing care; spreading the wings of health cadres by CHNs; and collaborating as the heart of Covid-19 prevention and management. Conclusion: CHNs should employ health education, empowerment strategies, group processes, and advocacy in adapting to the Covid-19 pandemic situation. The five themes identified in this study can be used by policy makers to develop strategies in optimizing the CHN in Covid-19 pandemic management and the possible challenges of future global pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses, Community Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Nurse Educ Today ; 112: 105330, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Smoking is an important modifiable risk factor of morbidities and mortality. Although healthcare professionals play an important role in smoking cessation, their adoption of such practices is relatively low because of inadequate training. To address this issue, we incorporated a service-learning model to operate the Youth Quitline. Undergraduate nursing students were trained and received supervision while delivering smoking cessation counseling through the Youth Quitline as their clinical placement. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of the placement by assessing students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control. DESIGN: One-group pretest-posttest design. SETTING: Youth Quitline. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 61 third-year students in a mental health nursing program. METHODS: Students were required to complete 80 h at the Youth Quitline. The 80 h were divided into 20 sessions; students used four sessions to approach and recruit youth smokers in the community, then provided them with telephone counseling for the rest of the time. Prior to the placement, students attended a 2-day workshop. The outcomes were changes in students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control 3 months after the placement compared with baseline. RESULTS: From January-June 2021, students conducted 105 outreach activities to identify 3142 smokers in the community, and provided telephone counseling for 336 smokers via Youth Quitline. Compared with baseline, significant improvements were observed in students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control at 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical placement improved students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control, enhancing their competency in providing support to assist smokers to quit in their future practice. Incorporating the service-learning model in existing community-based services can provide additional venues for nursing students to practice. This is particularly important because many venues have restricted access during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Smoking Cessation , Students, Nursing , Adolescent , Counseling , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Smoking Cessation/psychology
7.
Journal of Community Nursing ; 36(1):18-19, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1688367
8.
Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617072

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic required paediatric departments to quickly adapt to changing infection control policies, including altering physical space, pathway and rota restructuring, and adopting telemedicine platforms. As it emerged that COVID-19, as a disease entity, does not severely affect children, it became apparent the biggest challenges in delivering excellent care would be to overcome operational and organisational obstacles. Other challenges included delayed presentations of other conditions, waning staff morale and lack of paediatric specific infection control data and guidance. Methods: Our district general hospital's paediatric department established working groups comprising senior paediatricians, infection control leads and nursing managers. They regularly met during the first wave with the aim to optimise inpatient and outpatient paediatric care, agree on paediatric specific pathway changes and ensure staff morale was maintained. Actions: Paediatric doctors took over management of the paediatric emergency department (ED) to support adult services. Consultants became residents overnight to help manage ED and the requirements of a 'red' and 'yellow' admission pathway. We implemented a thrice-weekly multi-disciplinary resuscitation simulation to ensure all staff were aware of COVID adaptions to paediatric resuscitation algorithms. Weekly staff debriefs held to ensure the dissemination of pathway updates and to prioritise staff morale. Emergency funding led to the acquisition of new equipment to avoid cross-contamination with adult areas (e.g. blood gas analysers). Outpatient referrals were double-vetted by consultants and seen promptly. Over one year from January 2020, 8,104 children were seen in the clinic;4,619 (57%) were new referrals and seen face-to-face. We worked with adult services;the paediatric outpatient area was converted to an overflow adult ED. Paediatrics utilised an adult area with a larger footprint to continue face-to-face outpatient appointments. We extended our community nursing service to 7 days a week (from 5) to ensure more streamlined ambulatory care. Conclusions: Adaptability and flexibility were fundamental in implementing paediatric specific pathways. Schedule supportive team debriefs to promote staff wellbeing. Work with adult services to maintain excellent patient care throughout both specialities-we took over paediatric ED and utilised adult space to continue outpatient clinics. Anecdotally paediatricians preferred, and felt safer, undertaking face-to-face consultations for new outpatient appointments. Most children were not seen by their general practitioner prior to referral. We advocate ensuring all new outpatient referrals are seen face-to-face. Telemedicine was the preferred method for reviewing outpatient follow-ups. More research is required into the opportunities and barriers of paediatric telemedicine.

9.
Practice Nursing ; 33(1):32-32, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1606963

ABSTRACT

Crystal Oldman highlights the heroic efforts of general practice nurses in delivering the vaccination programme

10.
Nursing Praxis in Aotearoa New Zealand ; 37(3):53-61, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1594408

ABSTRACT

This article reports on a qualitative, single centre descriptive study on the experiences of nurses working in managed isolation and quarantine facilities (MIQFs) in Aotearoa New Zealand. Semi-structed interviews, via Zoom, took place with 14 registered nurses. The focus of this article is on the personal and social impacts on the nurses. The four themes discussed are: protecting the community while being a risk to the community;the barriers beyond the borders -- social stigma;kept at distance - families and social connections;and a part of, but apart from, other health professionals. This study captures a unique moment in the history of Aotearoa New Zealand and highlights how the nurses' professional and personal lives were significantly impacted. Unlike other studies of nurses caring for COVID-19 patients, the MIQF nurses were caring for guests who were in isolation due to the Aotearoa New Zealand's government directive to protect the borders from people returning to the country. The study offers valuable lessons for employers, colleagues, and the wider community about the necessity of supporting nurses through times of a pandemic.

11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580737

ABSTRACT

Little is known about how COVID-19 affects older patients living at home or how it affects district nursing teams providing care to these patients. This study aims to (1) explore, from the perspectives of Dutch district nurses, COVID-19's impact on patients receiving district nursing care, district nursing teams, and their organisations during the first outbreak in March 2020 as well as one year later; and (2) identify the needs of district nurses regarding future outbreaks. A mixed-methods, two-phase, sequential exploratory design was followed. In total, 36 district nurses were interviewed during the first outbreak (March 2020), of which 18 participated in the follow-up questionnaire in April 2021. Thirteen themes emerged, which showed that the COVID pandemic has substantially impacted patient care and district nursing teams. During the first outbreak, nurses played a crucial role in organising care differently and worked under high pressure, leading to exhaustion, tiredness, and psychosocial problems, including fear of infection. A year later, nurses were better prepared to provide COVID care, but problems regarding work pressure and mental complaints remained. The identified needs focus on a sustainable implementation of leadership roles for district nurses. At the organisational and national levels, more support and appreciation are needed in terms of trust and appropriate policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Archivos Venezolanos de Farmacologia y Terapeutica ; 40(6):575-580, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1566758

ABSTRACT

The role of the nurse is based on providing comprehensive quality care to the healthy or sick person and accompanying him/her in the healing and rehabilitation process, and if nec-essary, at the time of death. Objective: To examine the role of nursing in the Covid-19 pandemic through a systematic review. Methodology: A systematic investigation was carried out in the scientific databases PubMed, SciElo, Google Scholar, Nursing Journal combining the Boolean operators AND and OR, in Spanish, English and Portuguese. Results: The literary search reported 1243 documents after the ap-plication of the selection criteria and evaluative reading, 32 articles were included for analysis due to their belonging and contribution to the fulfillment of the objective. Conclusions: It is possible to affirm that the pandemic caused by Covid-19 placed the health systems in different challenges, where the nurse played a transcendental and recognized role, standing out for being the heart and fundamental pillar in the different levels of care, demonstrating their safety and leadership by being in a frontline scenario. © 2021, Venezuelan Society of Pharmacology and Clinical and Therapeutic Pharmacology. All rights reserved.

13.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(3): 480-481, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099730

ABSTRACT

Transitioning from bedside nursing to public health nursing after graduating with my Master's in Public Health was a unique experience, particularly as I navigated the COVID-19 pandemic as a new public health and nursing leader. Personal reflection pieces can provide a meaningful review of the experiences of integrating clinical nursing practice and more broad public health practice. The purpose of this paper is to offer my reflection and synthesis of the lessons learned while leading a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) through the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, I reflect on the future of FQHCs and the critical need to advance public health as a field and empower public health nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses, Public Health/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Narration
14.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(3): 439-444, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058027

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 spread through the United States in March 2020, universities were forced to move to online learning to minimize COVID-19 transmission. Students in nursing programs represent several generational cohorts with varying learning styles and comfort with technology. This move to an online format required faculty and students to use digital tools from video conferencing, remote testing, online classes, and an unfolding case study. Community Health Nursing is an important capstone course in the Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing curriculum. Community health nursing focuses on the care of populations. Communication skills, analysis of data from various sources, collaboration with peers, and planning and evaluation of interventions are essential competencies of community health nursing. This article describes strategies to teach the core competencies online and how two group activities were formatted for online delivery: development of a public service announcement and a debate. The faculty employed an approach to online teaching that preserved the activities and fostered student engagement through the use of various online strategies.


Subject(s)
Community Health Nursing/education , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL