Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 377
Filter
1.
European Journal of Trauma & Dissociation ; JOUR: 100306,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2104851

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown policy had a profound psychological impact on the general population worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the level of stress and coping strategies used during the initial stage of the COVID-19 outbreak and their association. Secondary aims were to a) identify the most important coping strategies and b) investigate predictors of stress. A cross-sectional study was conducted by using an anonymous online questionnaire. The study was carried out from April 23 to May 4 2020. A snowball sampling method was conducted to recruit potential participants from the general population of Greece and Cyprus. Participants over 18 years old who were familiar with the Greek language were included. The psychological impact was assessed by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). Coping strategies were assessed using 15 statements detected from a review of the literature. Participants were asked to rate each one of the coping strategies according to how important it was to them, on a four-point likert scale. The sample consisted of 3941 participants (74.2% women, N=2926), with a mean age of 36.9 years old. The most important coping strategies adopted were 1) “Dealing the situation with a positive attitude” (96.5%), 2) “Follow strict personal protective measures” (95,9%), 3) “Acquiring knowledge about coronavirus” (94.6%), 4) “Engaging in health-promoting behaviors” (89.6%), 5) “Limiting the time spent on media” (75.5%). The highest and positive coefficients were recorded for the association of IES-R scales with 1) “Talking with family and friends to reduce stress”, 2) “Seeking help from a mental health professional”, 3) “Limiting the time spent on media”, 4) “Relieving and managing emotions”, 5) “Practicing relaxation techniques”. 26.5% showed severe psychological impact. Conclusion: Addressing stress levels with the use of functional coping strategies can be beneficial to protect the general population from adverse psychological outcomes.

2.
Psychiatria Danubina ; JOUR:161-171, 33.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2092612

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim is to investigate anxiety prevalence among the healthcare workers during COVID-19 pandemic and the also relationship of "significant clinical anxiety" with coping styles and the relatedfactors. Subjects and methods: An online questionnaire was performed to evaluate the anxiety responses of544 healthcare workers, the adopted coping styles and the related factors during COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire included the subsections of sociodemographic data, other clinical data and the items on exposure to social media, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) Scale and Coping Styles Scale Brief Form. Result(s): Minimal, mild, moderate and severe anxiety were present in 214 (39.3%), 191 (35.1%), 95 (17.5%) and 44 (8.1%) participants, respectively. GAD-7 score was >10 in 139(25.6%) of the participants indicating "significant clinical anxiety". Being female and a nurse were associated with significant clinical anxiety. In addition, theparameters such as "concern about COVID-19, concern about infect COVID-19 to relatives, unwillingness to work, frequency of social media use about COVID-19, sleep disturbances and experiencing somatic symptoms" were observed to be extremely significantly more common in the healthcare workers with "significant clinical anxiety" than those without that mental condition. The regression analysis revealed that higher adoption of using emotional social support, one of the emotional focused coping styles and behavioral disengagement, one of the ineffektive focused coping styles are considered to be predictor of significant clinical anxiety. Whereas, positive reinterpretation, one of the emotional focused coping styles was a predictor in reduction of significant clinical anxiety. Also more frequent exposure to social media and sleep disturbances were the predictors of significant clinical anxiety in the healthcare staff. Conclusion(s): Our results have emphasized the factors that should be taken into account and application of coping styles that may be functional in protecting mental health of the healthcare workers in their struggle against a huge disaster affecting worldwide societies. Copyright © Medicinska naklada - Zagreb, Croatia

3.
Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience ; CHAP: 25-37,
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087959

ABSTRACT

During the rapid transition online, university educators had to reconsider how they supported students with disabilities and neurological differences in accessing a high-quality remote learning experience. This chapter explores my personal experiences as an Early Career Academic (ECA) tasked with supporting our faculty during the transition to remote learning. By collating my personal experiences leading up to and throughout this period, I reflect on my own coping strategies required to fulfill this role. I also explore the forms of resilience that I utilised to support my colleagues who had a spectrum of perspectives and knowledge of inclusive digital pedagogies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Journal of Affective Disorders ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2082583

ABSTRACT

Background The prevalence of depression symptoms among U.S. adults increased dramatically during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to understand the impact of the pandemic on people with a history of depression. Methods In June 2020, a national sample of 5023 U.S. adults, including 760 reporting past/current diagnoses of depression, completed survey measures related to the COVID experience, coping, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, a history of depression increased the odds of negative effects of pandemic on multiple aspects of life: routines, access to mental health treatment, alcohol use, prescription painkiller use, and other drug use. Those with a history of depression also scored significantly higher on the PHQ-8, GAD-7, and PDS-5 (all ps < 0.0001). Greater use of adaptive coping strategies was significantly associated with lower scores, and greater use of maladaptive strategies with higher scores. Individuals reporting a history of depression reported greater use of both adaptive and maladaptive strategies. Conclusions Adaptive coping strategies appear to be protective and help regulate symptomatology, suggesting that particular focus during the clinical encounter on developing tools to promote well-being, alleviate stress, and decrease perceptions of helplessness could mitigate the effects.

5.
Jamba ; 14(1): 1284, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080610

ABSTRACT

Hospital health care professionals (HCPs) play a vital and crucial role in saving the lives of patients afflicted with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). As the incidence of the disease keeps increasing, health care workers in hospitals face difficulties in discharging their duties. This study aimed to describe the lived experiences of HCPs. Particularly, it determined their challenges, motivations and coping strategies to craft grassroots policies for the enhancement of health care delivery in the Northern Philippines. Employing a phenomenological study design, 24 study participants were purposively selected and their narratives were elicited through focus group discussion. Responses were transcribed verbatim. After data analyses, the challenges, coping strategies and motivations of HCPs were identified. Results revealed that HCPs experienced a lot of challenges. Some of these were brought by the rapid changes in their environment as HCPs. Moreover, there was lack of comprehensive strategies that made them unprepared along with a lack of human and material resources. Furthermore, they experienced physical fatigue because of overwhelming workload, anxiety, fear and discrimination that led to depression. Despite these difficulties, they remain resilient because of religious coping, being true to their duty as HCPs and the support they receive from their fellows. Thus, the study recommends that protocols to ensue should centre on adequate pandemic preparedness and capacitation of HCPs.

6.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-7, 2021 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075651

ABSTRACT

The United Kingdom (UK) was among the hardest-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is, therefore, imperative to understand the coping strategies of individuals in the UK during the pandemic to develop appropriate programs and policies for them. A heterogeneous sample of 50 UK residents (15 males & 35 females) with an age range of 18-55 years were recruited using a snowball technique from Facebook between April and May 2020. Participants responded to 4 open-ended questions (that were generated through consultation with literature and 2 health practitioners) that sought to explore their coping strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thematic analysis was applied to analyze data using a data-driven method. Eleven themes were found: "socializing with loved ones (e.g., through video calls)", "engaging in exercise", "being occupied with jobs", "being occupied with studies", "avoiding negative news on COVID-19", "consumption of alcohol", "healthy eating", "engaging in meditation activities", "gaming activities", "hope", and "self-care and self-appreciation", in that order. Positive and maladaptive coping strategies were employed by some individuals in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic. This, therefore, echoes the need for appropriate psychosocial support programs that strengthen positive coping strategies and mitigate maladaptive coping strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

7.
J Vocat Behav ; 139: 103792, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076481

ABSTRACT

Crises like the COVID-19 pandemic can trigger concerns about loss of employment and changes in work conditions, and thereby increase job insecurity. Yet, little is known about how perceived job insecurity subsequently unfolds over time and how individual differences in habitual coping moderate such a trajectory. Using longitudinal data from 899 US-based participants across 5 waves (March to June 2020), we investigated the trajectory of job insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic and how this trajectory depended on habitual coping strategies such as planning, reappraisal, and distraction. Results from latent growth curve analysis indicated that, on average, job insecurity initially increased and then decreased after signing of the coronavirus stimulus bill, suggesting a pattern of shock followed by adjustment. During the shock phase, habitual use of distraction was related to less increases in job insecurity. Later during the adjustment phase, decreases in job insecurity were more pronounced for individuals with higher habitual use of planning, but were not affected by reappraisal or distraction. Hence, different coping strategies appear beneficial in different phases of adjustment, and the beneficial effect of planning may take time to manifest. Altogether, our study highlights how in the context of extraordinary and uncontrollable events, coping strategies can impact the trajectory of a stressor.

8.
Management Science ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070715

ABSTRACT

Drawing on the notion of compensatory behavior, this paper studies how students compensate for learning loss during a pandemic and what role artificial intelligence (AI) plays in this regard. We further probe into a difference in compensatory behavior for learning loss in terms of quantity, pattern, and pace (i.e., tripartite aspect of learning behavior) of AI-powered learning app usage depending on the level of pandemic threat and the proximity of a goal to students. Results show that the pandemic threat affects student learning behavior differently. Immediately following the COVID-19 outbreak, students who live in the epicenter of the outbreak (versus those who do not) use the app less at first, but with time, they use it more (quantity), on a more regular basis (pattern), and rebound to a curriculum path (pace) comparable to students who do not live in the outbreak's epicenter. These findings collectively explain behavior that is consistent with compensation for learning loss. The results also partially corroborate the goal-proximity effect, revealing that proximity to a goal (e.g., the degree to which the national university admission exam is approaching) has a moderating role in explaining the tripartite perspective of student learning behavior. Overall, these findings have important theoretical and practical implications for understanding how innovative education technologies can not only facilitate student learning during adversity, but also support learning recovery after adversity.

9.
International Journal of Stress Management ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2069866

ABSTRACT

This study seeks to expand previous research by examining (a) the prevalence rates of posttraumatic growth (PTG) and its potential predictors (posttraumatic stress symptoms [PTSS], perceived stress, adaptive coping strategies, social support) during the first and second lockdown in the general population of Greece, and (b) the mediating role of the stress indicators (PTSS/perceived stress) in the relationship between positive reframing and PTG. A sample of 1,361 participants (1.009 in the first lockdown and 352 in the second lockdown) completed the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5), The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Inventory and the ENRICHD Social Support Instrument (ESSI). Moderate levels of PTG were found during both lockdowns. PTG did not significantly increase during the second lockdown. PTG was associated with PTSS during the first lockdown and with perceived stress during the second one;these two stress indicators partially mediated the positive reframing-PTG relationship in the first and second lockdown, respectively. Both adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies predicted PTG during the first lockdown, whereas only adaptive coping strategies predicted PTG during the second lockdown. Perceived social support, emotional during the first lockdown and instrumental during the second one, predicted PTG during the two lockdowns, respectively. The results of this study may enhance our understanding of PTG and its predictor to inform the design of interventions moving beyond growth cognitions into growth actions.

10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071431

ABSTRACT

Many studies have investigated the state of the health of healthcare workers during the acute period of the pandemic. Yet, few studies have assessed the health of such professionals after the pandemic and in a less dramatic period. This study involved a particular sample represented by residents in anaesthesia-resuscitation and psychiatry at a university in northern Italy particularly affected by the pandemic. The objectives were to investigate some indicators of health and well-being and compare the two groups of trainees. Using Google Forms, the following tests were proposed: the General Health Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Subjective Happiness Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, Brief Resilience Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, as well as an ad hoc questionnaire. A qualifying element of the work was the discussion of the results with the trainees. Various strengths have emerged, such as high values of resilience and job satisfaction; a positive assessment of the support received from the work team; an articulate use of coping strategies; and good levels of happiness and satisfaction with life, in both specialities. However, a widespread anxiety also emerged, which appears to be more attributable to concerns about professional evaluation, rather than the pandemic itself. In summary, the trainees seem to have found a fair amount of personal balance, whereas the relationship with the patient seems to be more compromised. In the comparison between specialities, the only significant differences are the levels of depersonalisation and resilience, both of which are higher in anaesthetists.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071423

ABSTRACT

This study analyzed changes in the psychological health of students who were in the final year of their nursing degree during the COVID-19 pandemic and later served as nursing professionals in hospitals. Methods: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted over two periods of time (the first in April 2020 and the second 6 months later, in December 2020) with 296 students for a T0 baseline (rate response 68.83%) and 92 students for a T1 post-test sample (response rate 31.08%). The data were electronically collected using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, and a post-traumatic stress questionnaire. The mean age of the sample participants was 24.17 years (SD = 5.51), and 89.11% were female. During the pandemic, 14.11% of students showed scores that indicated depression, and 32.61% showed scores that indicated anxiety. In December 2020, 86.5% of the participants were working as nurses, and the percentages of those with anxiety (12%) and depression (4.3%) were significantly lower than in the first sample period. A total of 20.7% of the participants had post-traumatic stress. High scores for resilience were significantly associated with better quality of life and lower levels of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. Conclusions: Although the percentages of participants with anxiety and depression decreased, they still presented with mental health problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Students, Nursing , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Quality of Life , Longitudinal Studies , Prospective Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
12.
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management ; 52:356-365, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2069331

ABSTRACT

Given COVID-19's disproportionate adverse impact on hospitality employees, we explore the proposition that COVID-19-related career challenges prompt CALD hospitality workers to rethink the meaning and purpose of work to explore ways to cope and restore occupational well-being, thus triggering occupational change. Thematic analysis of qualitative data from interviews with 25 CALD hotel workers reveal different sub-groups of CALD hotel workers differentially cognitively frame pandemic-induced employment changes to cope and restore occupational well-being: 1. as an opportunity for behavioral (occupational) change by CALD workers in refugee jobs;2. as a temporary phenomenon, with CALD workers who were temporary migrants foreseeing positive career outcomes;and 3. as an opportunity for behavioral (occupational) advancement in hotels by CALD workers who were permanent residents with hospitality qualifications. We contribute to literature at the intersection of coping and occupational well-being research in hospitality, providing a fine-grained understanding of how CALD hotel workers coped and restored occupational well-being, by differentially reconstruing the meaning of work and undertaking occupational change, be it cognitive or behavioral.

13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066030

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we examined how university staff and students coped with challenges related to working or studying from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the level of satisfaction with working from home. An online survey was conducted among faculty, staff, and students at universities in 24 countries (n = 674). The results show that over 80% of the respondents used multiple coping methods. Three clusters of coping methods were generated through factor analysis: (1) social and health factor, with focus on personal health and the social surrounding, (2) activity factor, i.e., being busy with work or studies, finding up-to-date information about COVID-19, while thinking about what one could do rather than what one could not do, and (3) public health factor, which meant trusting health authorities while avoiding misinformation from sources such as social media. Furthermore, 56% of the respondents were very or somewhat satisfied with working from home. Differences in the methods of coping and satisfaction with working from home highlight the need for employers to prepare for working from home beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066018

ABSTRACT

The main objective of our study was to determine whether the experience of the types of pandemic threats included in the study, could activate development responses among adolescents and what the role of the level of stress experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic is in the process of post-traumatic PTG growth. We also made an attempt to investigate whether personality traits and gender were predictors of PTG growth in adolescents. Therefore, the theoretical bases for the interpretation of the obtained results are models of post-traumatic growth (PTG), mainly by Calhoun and Tedeschi. The research was conducted in March 2020. The study subjects were 405 adolescents aged 14 to 20 years, with an average age of 17 years, of whom 59% were females and 41% were males. The following methods were used in the study: IPIP-BFM-20 to estimate five personality traits, PSS- to diagnose perceived stress, and an in-house questionnaire of pandemic threats experienced by adolescents (KZP). The results showed that the various types of 'pandemic' threats (threats to life, family, and lifestyle) are positive predictors of growth-related changes; additionally, such factors as personality traits (here: extroversion), stress level, and gender had a positive mediating effect on growth-related changes. It was also possible to show that out of the four dimensions of post-traumatic growth, three could be activated under pandemic conditions. These were: changes in relationships with others, greater appreciation of everyday life, and spiritual changes. Changes in self-perception-one of the dimensions of post-traumatic growth, were not activated due to experiencing three types of pandemic threats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Life-threatening events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, may generate feelings of insecurity and fear in the affected population, particularly children. Parents' ability to help children cope with negative emotions is essential during challenging periods. The current study aims to analyse the coping strategies adopted by Italian caregivers concerning their children's fears about COVID-19. METHOD: An online survey was administered during the Italian lockdown to 649 parents of at least one child aged 5 to 17 years old. Respondents completed the survey for themselves and their children. In addition, a qualitative content analysis of the data from the open-ended question was conducted (N = 569; 87.9% women; MAge = 45 years). RESULTS: Several themes were identified. Firstly, families' primary approach was 'communication and meaning-making'. Secondly, another essential strategy was 'the importance of safe space', enabled by keeping routine in place and creating a loving and caring environment. Thirdly, other factors relevant to managing children's fears were 'adaptation', 'religion', 'a positive attitude', and 'humour and hope'. Finally, the last two strategies significant and valuable for Italian families were 'flexibility' and 'maintaining virtual contacts. CONCLUSION: During the pandemic COVID-19, parents may have used various strategies to protect their children from stress. Future research could investigate single parents' coping strategies explicitly developed during the COVID-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
16.
Outlook on Agriculture ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2053584

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the impacts of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on smallholder farmers and their coping strategies in three contrasting Low- and Middle-Income Countries. The case studies include Brazil (South region), Madagascar (Atsimo Atsinanana region), and Tanzania (Morogoro/Eastern Tanzania). These countries were chosen because i) the economies are strongly influenced by the agricultural sector;ii) their national food security is strongly affected by smallholder production, and, iii) they represent a set of contrasting government responses to COVID-19 including the denial of the pandemic. Data were collected through semi-structured household interviews in all three countries in rural areas. COVID-19 induced effects were found in all three countries, including in Brazil and Tanzania where both national governments initially neglected the existence of COVID-19 and introduced few containment measures only. Here, mobility and trade restrictions of other countries impact also on agricultural trade and production in countries in which governments took less action to COVID-19 and also people remained home and practiced social distancing even if no official government policy was issued. The findings in all three countries suggest that the COVID-19 crisis had negatively affected smallholders’ agricultural production, leading to a vicious cycle of low production, low incomes, and higher food insecurity. Results of this study raise the thorny issue of how best to balance containment of pandemic and future shocks against the well-being of the vulnerable rural population in lower- and middle-income countries;especially considering also the degree of global interconnected and the potential of polices to effect people beyond the national scale. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Outlook on Agriculture is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
2022 IEEE International Conference on Digital Health, ICDH 2022 ; : 66-68, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2051993

ABSTRACT

Many people experienced an increase in mental health distress due to the isolation requirements arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic and the resulting isolation protocols to control the spread of the virus no doubt, sparked researchers' interest in seeking solutions to address the impact on people's mental health in different situations. One of such solutions is the use of technologies to cope with mental health challenges. Though a plethora of technology exists for communication and socialization with several others proposed to deal with mental health breakdown during the pandemic, there is no 'one-size fits all' technology that has been identified to address every individual's distress level and coping strategy. This study thus, examines the existing technologies that have been used by people to manage their mental health distress, and proposes a sociotechnical model that can be used to identify current technologies and the effectiveness of such technologies in addressing an individual's mental health distress and symptoms. © 2022 IEEE.

18.
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment ; : 1-9, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2050946

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 “Corona” virus which spread across the entire world infected 228 Countries and Territories around the world and a total of 608,334,993 confirmed cases of the coronavirus COVID-19 that originated from Wuhan, China, and a death toll of 6,496,836 deaths. In the United States, it affected more than 9.4 million people. This has changed the entire lifestyle of the people and schools and colleges were shut down from 16th March 2020 onwards. This article focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on social work education, and the psychological and sociological aspects of the community in Louisiana. Data was collected using an online a 15 -item questionnaire that was emailed to all the students studying at the Louisiana Christian University, Louisiana State. Findings revealed that there is a need for advanced preparedness plans and resources to face sudden epidemics. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

19.
Z Gerontol Geriatr ; 55(7): 546-552, 2022 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048242

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the pandemic caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in spring and summer 2020, the anxiety and concerns of residents living in long-term care facilities about contracting and falling ill from the virus (corona concerns) increased. Contact to close persons represents an important asset in coping with concerns or anxiety; however, this was strictly regulated particularly in nursing facilities. Therefore, an elevated psychological burden was assumed; however, there is a lack of representative data. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to answer the question: how do social contacts influence the corona concerns of long-term nursing home residents? MATERIAL AND METHODS: In summer 2020 a representative sample of 259 long-term nursing home residents in the whole of Austria participated in a standardized face-to-face interview. RESULTS: Firstly, the data show a high emotional burden in nursing home residents; however, many residents also demonstrated a certain degree of mental resilience. Secondly, there was an association between emotional loneliness and higher corona concerns (odds ratio, OR = 2.30; p < 0.01). Thirdly, a frequent contact with relatives via telephone or in person also related to higher corona concerns (OR = 1.32; p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: In the current times, when one crisis is replaced by the next, more knowledge is needed about the mental resilience of long-term nursing home residents and how it can be promoted. Furthermore, more knowledge is needed about the role of relatives and whether they are more the origin of concerns or they represent a strategy for coping with concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Loneliness
20.
Espaces, Tourisme & Loisirs ; 358:118-125, 2021.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2046930

ABSTRACT

Accor, the European leader in the hotel industry, has been hit hard by the effects of the health crisis since March 2020. With the closure of hotels, hiring freeze, and deployment of partial unemployment, more than 220,000 employees have been affected by the consequences of the pandemic on the hotel group's activity. Beyond the emergency measures put in place, Accor has deployed an unprecedented aid system aimed at financially supporting its employees in the most difficult situation, and at welcoming the most vulnerable people within its establishments. At the same time, the group is already working on its recovery. It is in the process of certifying its hotels to guarantee optimum sanitary conditions, and is adapting a strategy focusing on the development of the lifestyle segment and on local customers.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL