Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.022
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 927874, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080283

ABSTRACT

Background: Hospice and palliative care (HPC) aims to improve end-of-life quality and has received much more attention through the lens of an aging population in the midst of the coronavirus disease pandemic. However, several barriers remain in China due to a lack of professional HPC providers with positive behavioral intentions. Therefore, we conducted an original study introducing machine learning to explore individual behavioral intentions and detect factors of enablers of, and barriers to, excavating potential human resources and improving HPC accessibility. Methods: A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate healthcare providers' behavioral intentions, knowledge, attitudes, and practices in hospice care (KAPHC) with an indigenized KAPHC scale. Binary Logistic Regression and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) were performed to model impacting and predict individual behavioral intentions. Results: The RFC showed high sensitivity (accuracy = 0.75; F1 score = 0.84; recall = 0.94). Attitude could directly or indirectly improve work enthusiasm and is the most efficient approach to reveal behavioral intentions. Continuous practice could also improve individual confidence and willingness to provide HPC. In addition, scientific knowledge and related skills were the foundation of implementing HPC. Conclusion: Individual behavioral intention is crucial for improving HPC accessibility, particularly at the initial stage. A well-trained RFC can help estimate individual behavioral intentions to organize a productive team and promote additional policies.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Palliative Care , Supervised Machine Learning
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071467

ABSTRACT

This study aims to examine the capacity of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to explain the intention to use social networking sites by older people in two time periods, before and after confinement due to the COVID-19 epidemic, as well as the evolution of effects (paths) over time of TPB's determinants. Based on interviews from samples of 384 and 383 elderly Chilean adults collected before and after confinement, the evolution of the effects (paths) was analysed using the TPB model applying the PLS-SEM technique. The intention to use social networks and its association with three factors were evaluated: attitude toward the behaviour, subjective norms, and perceived control over the behaviour. The model explains the intention to use social networks by 27% before confinement, increasing its magnitude to 50% after confinement. After the period of confinement, their attitudes become more significant, their perceptions of control become less important, and social pressures remain permanent in predicting the behaviour. In conclusion, better access and greater use of social networks by older people during the lockdown period increased the predictive strength of the attitude towards these technologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adult , Humans , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Chile/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Intention , Social Networking , Surveys and Questionnaires , Psychological Theory
3.
Int J Med Inform ; 168: 104885, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Leading influencing factors for telemedicine implementation remain unclear, affecting the focus of intervention strategies. Despite recent effectiveness evidence of video telemedicine visits, limited evidence exists regarding patients' willingness to use video follow-up. Moreover, patients' acceptance is crucial for implementing such services. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a large-sample survey to analyze patient willingness and perceptions of post-discharge video follow-up and assessed the factors influencing their willingness during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHOD: In February and March 2022, we conducted a face-to-face questionnaire survey involving inpatients in a tertiary care hospital in Longhua District, Shenzhen, China. We assessed demographics, health-related determinants, access to technology and literacy, preferences, willingness, and opinions toward video telemedicine follow-up. We implemented random forest and logistic regression analyses to obtain reliable results. RESULTS: In total, 1,017 inpatients completed the survey. Overall, as an initial choice, 44.9 % preferred telephone consultation for post-discharge follow-up, which was followed by video telemedicine (17.1 %), WeChat voice calls (11.6 %), SMS text messages (10.7 %), WeChat graphic messages (10.5 %), and in-person visits (4.5 %). Moreover, 54.9 % were willing to experience video visits. The results highlight the perceived benefits outweighing the risks (OR 2.64, 95 % CI 1.76, 3.95), patients' trust in the physician (OR 2.41, 95 % CI 1.45, 3.99), access to a private space (OR 2.18, 95 % CI 1.01, 2.96), medium geographical distance (compared to long distance, OR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.54, 0.98), moderate disease (compared to mild disease, OR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57, 0.99), followed by the comfort with video technology (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.76, 3.95), broadband internet accessibility (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.07, 2.27), privacy concerns (OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.43, 0.89), and prior telemedicine video experience (OR 1.77, 95 % CI 1.15, 2.72), as factors influencing the willingness to use video follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A low percentage of patients chose video visits as their initial decisions; nevertheless, most had a positive attitude toward video follow-up visits. The willingness to choose video telemedicine post-discharge follow-up was influenced by geographical distance, disease severity, basic telemedicine requirements, physician-patient relationship, and perceptions of video communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Referral and Consultation , Patient Discharge , Aftercare , Follow-Up Studies , Telephone , COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods
4.
Turkiye Klinikleri Journal of Medical Sciences ; 42(3):204-212, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067037

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the attitudes of health care professionals involved within the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic process towards the COVID-19 vaccine in line with their demographic characteristics. Material(s) and Method(s): A questionnaire consisting of 16 questions was conducted to 510 healthcare professionals working in Inegol State Hospital between December 2021-January 2022 and who agreed to participate in the study, to determine their approach to the COVID-19 vaccine. The data were collected with Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U Test. Chi-square test was used in comparison of categorical variables. Result(s): While 54.3% of the respondents said that they don't want to have the COVID-19 vaccine, 69% answered that "Since there is not any adequate research on the vaccine, the vaccine is not reliable". Were observed that vaccine rejection was most common in the 20-29 age group (72.7%) and pregnant women (100%). In addition, as the education level increased, the number of people considering vaccination increased. The desire to be vaccinated was seen more in married, and it was noted that non-smokers had more COVID-19 (80.3%). Conclusion(s): Healthcare professionals who participated in study were found to have a negative attitude towards COVID-19 vaccine. Although healthcare professionals have hesitations about vaccine, in fact, noteworthy that they're afraid of the disease (43.8%). Despite of the pandemic, more than half (54.3%) of healthcare professionals working in Inegol State Hospital stated that they didn't think about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Providing hospital staff with more education about the safety, efficacy, and value of currently available COVID-19 vaccines is critical to vaccine acceptance in this population. Copyright © 2022 by Turkiye Klinikleri.

5.
Haseki Tip Bulteni ; 60(4):310-317, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066932

ABSTRACT

Aim: Real-life data on the effect of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccination is limited. We aimed to compare the incidence of COVID-19 among healthcare workers (HCWs) in the pre-vaccination and post-vaccination periods during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify associated factors for COVID-19 development. Method(s): In this single-center and cross-sectional study, HCWs employed in a tertiary care hospital were included. Pre-vaccination (14 October, 2020 and 14 January, 2021) and post-vaccination periods (1 March, 2021 and 1 June, 2021) were compared. A subgroup analysis was performed on HCWs without a previous history of COVID-19. Additionally, univariate regression analysis of COVID-19 development in the post-vaccination period was performed. Result(s): Of 2,922 HCWs, 2,096 (71.7%) were vaccinated. The incidence of COVID-19 was higher in the pre-vaccination period (16.3%) than in the post-vaccination (6.6%) (p<0.01). In the subgroup analysis, the incidence of COVID-19 was 16.6% in the pre-vaccination period and 8.1% in the post-vaccination period (p<0.01). Previous history of COVID-19 (p<0.01) and double-dose vaccination (p<0.01) were associated with a decreased risk of COVID-19 development. Conclusion(s): This study demonstrates the real-life impact of COVID-19 vaccination in reducing disease development and preventing poor clinical outcomes in a setting where the vaccination rate among HCWs was fairly low. Copyright © 2022 by The Medical Bulletin of Istanbul Haseki Training and Research Hospital The Medical Bulletin of Haseki published by Galenos Yayinevi.

6.
Journal of Acute Disease ; 11(4):156-160, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066826

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore risk factors of mucormycosis in COVID-19 recovered patients. Methods: A total of 101 patients, who were diagnosed with mucormycosis after recovery from COVID-19 and admitted to the Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, a tertiary care hospital in India, were included in the study. The presenting clinical features and associated risk factors were assessed and analyzed subsequently. Results: Of 101, 68 (67.3%) were males, and 33 (32.7%) were females. A total of 89 (88.1%) patients were between 46 and 65 years old. The most common subtypes were rhino-ocular (61.4%), followed by paranasal sinuses (16.8%), rhino-ocular cerebral (16.8%), ocular (3.0%), and pulmonary (2.0%). Diabetes mellitus was present in 71% of cases of mucormycosis as co-morbidities. A total of 76.2% of patients were given systemic corticosteroids in oral or intravenous form during COVID-19 treatment. Severe COVID-19 was present in 45.5% of patients with mucormycosis, while the moderate infection was present in 35.6% of mucormycosis. Most patients had gap between the onset of mucormycosis and COVID-19 <15 d. Conclusions: A lethal confluence of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, corticosteroid usage, and COVID-19 could cause a dramatic rise in mucormycosis. So, clinicians must be aware of these risk factors in patients suffering as well as recovering from COVID-19 to prevent mucormycosis.

7.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:1593-1598, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066708

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the healthcare of Type 2 Diabetes patients and identify the factors that correlated. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2020 to February 2021. The study enrolled 400 adults with Type 2 diabetes aged 40–65 years with at least one other chronic illness who received primary care health services in Vlore, Albania. A short questionnaire based on the literature, considering the situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, was used for data collection. The administration of the questionnaire was carried out by trained nurses. All participants give their written informed consent before administering the questionnaire. Pearson’s two-tailed correlations and linear regression were used to test the correlations. RESULTS: Among 400 patients with Type 2 Diabetes in the study, 53.0% were female and 47.0% were men. Most of the participants were married (n = 303) with a high level of edcation (54.3%). Treatment was mainly with oral medications (58.0%). Based on the body mass index (BMI), 63.0% of the participants were overweight. Employment status (p = 003), the type of treatment, oral medication versus insulin (p = 001), BMI (p = 001), and living alone (p = 008) were the most correlated factors. CONCLUSIONS: The care of Type 2 Diabetic patients due to the COVID-19 pandemic is closely associated with social determinants of health and the resources of health-care settings. The need to address innovative approaches to care, including self-care, social support, and e-health, is recommended.

8.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(E):1420-1425, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Indonesia’s lowest COVID-19 vaccine coverage of 6.5% is found in Teluk Makmur Village, Dumai City, Riau province. The success of the COVID-19 vaccination program is determined by vaccine hesitancy, which comprises numerous and presumably complex factors that vary over time and between countries or between regions of one given country. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy prevalence and influencing factors in the community. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to November 2021 at Teluk Makmur Village, Dumai City, Riau Province, Indonesia, involving 149 respondents aged 25–93 years and using a questionnaire on respondents’ sociodemographic characteristics and their opinions on possible COVID-19 vaccines. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy factors were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression (p ˂ 0.05). RESULTS: COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was present in 51.7% of respondents. Multivariable logistic regression findings: Comorbidities, fear of dying from COVID-19, feelings of shame/stigmatization if known to be infected with COVID-19 were not significantly associated with vaccine hesitancy. Education and distrust of government COVID-19 related policy were significantly associated with vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSION: Half of respondents were hesitant about COVID-19 vaccines. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy factors consisted of education and distrust of government policy.

9.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:2029-2033, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066705

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causes the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines affecting hemostasis. Although the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a vital role in the fibrinolysis system, little is known about its profile among people with latent tuberculosis (TB). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study that involves 80 healthcare workers. The study was conducted in two academic medical centers of Makassar city, Indonesia, from September to October 2021. PAI-1 levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. The statistical test results were significant if p < 0.05. RESULTS: Although there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in PAI-1 levels, PAI-1 level among participants in the latent TB infection (LTBI) group was found to be lower (4.9 ng/mL) than in the healthy control group (6.0 ng/mL). In addition, participants in the LTBI group with a history of being infected (9.6 ng/mL) with the COVID-19 had higher PAI-1 levels than those who had never been infected (2.3 ng/mL), which is statistically significant (p = 0.004). Although there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in PAI-1 levels among participants in the healthy control group, those with a history of being infected (6.7 ng/mL) demonstrated higher PAI-1 levels than those who had never been infected (4.8 ng/mL). CONCLUSIONS: PAI-1 levels were lower in LTBI participants, which potentially is due to more participants in the healthy control group having a history of COVID-19 infection.

10.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:1272-1275, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mechanical chest compression devices play an important role in assisting patients undergoing cardiac arrest. However, this equipment induces an aerosol-generating procedure that could contaminate hospital staff. The development of a remote control system for mechanical chest compression devices may solve the problem;however, there are currently no studies regarding the efficacy of this system. AIM: This study aims to analyze efficacy of remote control systems for mechanical chest compression devices and compare it with non-remote control systems. METHODS: This was an analytical cross-sectional study at Srinagarind Hospital, Thailand. Data were collected in two periods of the study. The first period was between January and December 2021 using a non-remote control system to operate the mechanical chest compression device. The second period was from January to April 2022 and collected data on the use of a remote control system. RESULTS: Sixty-four participants were examined over the 16-month period of the study. A total of 53.1% (n = 34) of participants were male and the mean age of the patients was 52.4 ± 5.1 years old. The number of emergency medical service members (EMS) needed for resuscitation in the remote control group was less than the non-remote control group (3 vs. 5;p = 0.040). The number of emergency department (ED) members needed for resuscitation in the remote control group was four compared with eight in the non-remote control group. CONCLUSIONS: The remote controlled mechanical chest compression device can effectively reduce the number of staff working both in the EMS and in the ED of the hospital, thus reducing exposure and contamination from aerosol-generating procedure. It was also proven accurate in terms of rate and depth of chest compression according to resuscitation guidelines.

11.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:1818-1826, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome has led to a pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Malnutrition either biochemically or anthropometrically is a well-known risk factor for COVID-19 and may be the vice versa AIM: The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of malnutrition in children infected with COVID-19 through evaluating the nutritional biomarkers such as serum electrolytes, serum albumin, and hemoglobin together with the anthropometric assessment. METHODS: A cross-sectional study that was conducted at El-Matria Teaching Hospital for all children admitted with confirmed COVID-19 for 6 months from February 1, 2021 to the end of July, 2021. Nutritional biochemical evaluation included serum electrolytes particularly the potassium and other nutritional biomarkers such as serum albumin and hemoglobin. Nutritional anthropometric evaluation depended on body mass index, the height/length, weight for length, and weight for height. The prevalence of malnutrition esp. hypokalemia was the main outcome. RESULTS: Hypokalemia was present in 21.8% of the study participants. Other nutritional biomarkers were found as hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia were detected in 49.1%, 38.2%, 21.8%, and 34.5% of the study subjects, respectively. Anthropometric malnutrition was present in most of the enrolled children with COVID-19 in the study (65.5 % [n = 36]) through which overweight and obese children occupied a greater percentage. CONCLUSION: Malnutrition either biochemically or anthropometrically could be linked to COVID-19 in children. COVID-19 could have negative outcomes on the nutritional status such as electrolytes disturbances. Both malnutrition and COVID-19 are considered synergistic associations.

12.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:555-559, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066686

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Vaccination is an important step to prevent COVID-19. AIM: This study aimed to analyze the predictive factors of community engagement in COVID-19 vaccination in East Java, Indonesia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using purposive sampling was conducted on people aged 12–>60 years (n = 1,024) in Lamongan Regency, East Java Province, Indonesia, in August–September 2021. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the relationship between community engagement in COVID-19 vaccination and other predictors. RESULTS: We included 1024 people aged 12–65 years, with a mean age (±SD) of 29 (12.7). Around 94.0% of the participants reported that they had been vaccinated twice. The role of supportive health cadres could increase community participation by 0.496 times in COVID-19 vaccination compared to the less supportive health cadres (OR = 0.496;95.0% CI: 0.292–0.845;p = 0.010). In addition, the role of supportive community leaders could increase community participation by 1.959 times in COVID-19 vaccination compared to the less supportive community leaders (OR = 1.959;95.0% CI: 1.080–3.551;p = 0.027). CONCLUSIONS: The role of health cadres and community leaders can increase community participation in COVID-19 vaccination. The partnership between community health center and community engagement in the COVID-19 vaccination program needs to be continued.

13.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:638-643, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spread of COVID-19 infection has led to high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Nurses are the frontline health workers in handling COVID-19 infections, so adequate preparedness is needed for them to contribute to controlling and preventing the infections. AIM: This study examines the differences in nurses’ preparedness to control and prevent COVID-19 infection at the two hospitals in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. METHODS: This study is a comparative study with a cross-sectional study approach. The sample were nurses in the COVID-19 ward at hospitals A (n = 75) and B (n = 36). Data collection was conducted by administering a questionnaire consisting of 39 items in a 5-point Likert scale through Google Forms. The questionnaire satisfied the content validity by experts and reliability test using Cronbach alpha (∝ = 0.968). Mann–Whitney U-test was conducted for analyzing the data. RESULTS: The results revealed no significant difference in the preparedness of nurses in controlling and preventing the COVID-19 infection in both hospitals (p = 0.860). CONCLUSION: The study findings indicate that respondents’ demographic data, such as working experience, nurse education, working experience in the COVID-19 ward, and participation in COVID-19 management training, contributed to the nurses’ preparedness.

14.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; Part G. 10:656-661, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic was first announced in Indonesia on March 2, 2020, which affected health services including vaccination for children. AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in children vaccination in Indonesia before the COVID-19 pandemic (2019) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020). METHOD(S): This study applied cross-sectional design with the Paired Sample t-test test. The research data were obtained from the East Java Provincial Health Office in January-December 2019 and January-December 2020 which consisted of 968 first-level health-care facilities spread over 38 districts in East Java, Indonesia. RESULT(S): The results of this study were 3.85-10.57, with t values of 4.348 and df 37 and p = 0.000 so that there was a significant difference in vaccination of Indonesian children before the COVID-19 pandemic and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Mean +/- SD value before the pandemic in 2019 was 18.57 +/- 12.87 and during the pandemic in 2020 was 11.36 +/- 9.47. CONCLUSION(S): Vaccination of children in Indonesia decreased between before and during the COVID-19 pandemic because of a policy to stay at home and avoid crowds. Parents and children were reluctant to come to the posyandu (Integrated Health Post). The involvement of posyandu cadres is needed to be able to increase child vaccination in Indonesia. Copyright © 2022.

15.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(E):1505-1510, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: West Java is ranked 4th as the province with the highest number of COVID-19 cases in Indonesia up to December 1, 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic has a major impact on human health, lifestyle changes, and economic life. AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on lifestyle changes among the community of West Java. METHODS: The study was conducted in September 2020 using a cross-sectional study design. A total of 2502 people aged ≥12 years living in West Java were involved in this study as a sample, willing to fill out a questionnaire in the form of a Google form that was distributed online through social media (WhatsApp, Facebook, and Instagram). RESULTS: The results showed that the COVID-19 pandemic had an effect on lifestyle changes in the people of West Java. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the people of West Java became more frequent to wash their hands, do regular exercise, sunbathe in the morning, consume more vegetables and fruits, and consume vitamins or supplements to increase endurance (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Based on the result, the community should continue to improve the COVID-19 prevention practices in breaking the chain of transmission.

16.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(E):1397-1401, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066673

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many studies have found that assessing COVID-19 preventive behaviors using the health belief model (HBM) to understand both motives and fears is critical to better controlling the disease. AIM: The aim of the study was to assess the perceptions of social distancing as a preventive measure during the COVID-19 pandemic using the HBM among a sample of the Egyptian population. METHODS: An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted using an online survey distributed through one of Egypt’s most popular social media platforms. Four hundred and seventy people responded to the survey. The survey constructed of two sections;the first section for sociodemographic data and Section 2 was for HBM constructs of self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and severity to COVID-19 prevention benefits and barriers. RESULTS: More than half of the participants (59.8%) were in the age range of 20–29, with an average age of 29.0 ± 6.4 years. Two hundred ninety-seven participants (63.2%) were females;60.2% lived in the canal region;57.9% were single;and 70% had university degrees. There were statistically significant differences regarding gender;females’ perceived higher scores in almost all model constructs (benefits, susceptibility, severity, self-efficacy, and total score). Many statistically significant differences were observed;those who were older than 30 years had higher scores in barriers, benefits, self-efficacy, and total score than younger ones. Similarly, married participants reported higher scores in barriers, benefits, self-efficacy, and total score than younger ones. Postgraduate education perceived higher scores than university in benefits, susceptibility, self-efficacy, and total score. CONCLUSION: In the present study, the majority of respondents had relatively high perceived benefits, severity, and self-efficacy, with the lower perceived self-COVID-19 susceptibility but higher for family members. Females perceived higher scores in almost all model constructs (benefits, susceptibility, severity, self-efficacy, and total score).

17.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(8):335-337, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067752

ABSTRACT

Background: Occupational hazards and risks are a common public health issue, especially when healthcare workers safety is concerned;they are on high risk of catching infections such like COVID-19. The possibility of cross-infection between dental practitioners and patients is significantly higher due to the close exposure of dental staff to patient oral environment. Aim(s): To assess the prevalence of SARS-COV-2 antibodies in dental workers working in the Peshawar Dental College and Hospital, Peshawar. Study Design: Cross sectional study Place and Duration of Study: Department of Orthodontics, Peshawar Dental College & Hospital, Peshawar from 1st January 2020 to 31st December 2020. Methodology: One hundred and thirty three dental workers were enrolled. The investigation was run to detect immunoglobulin G and M antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2-2. The aspirated aerosol and air was evacuated and dissipated into the atmosphere. Result(s): Mean age was 29.4+/-1.4 years and males were dominant 74 (55.6%) and male workers found greater with positive antibodies. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was 33.0%. Proportionately dental assistants (20.5% vs 16.9%) and ancillary staff (20.5% vs 10.1%) had higher prevalence. Sore throat and body aches were more common in positive antibodies cases while travel history was found significantly associated with it (40.9% vs 25.0%, p-value, 0.05). Conclusion(s): High frequency of SARS-COV-2 antibodies was found in dental workers showing a high infection rate of COVID-19 in healthcare workers in local settings. Copyright © 2022 Lahore Medical And Dental College. All rights reserved.

18.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(8):269-271, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067750

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, highly infectious, respiratory illness caused by SARS-CoV2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) virus. It has devastating effects with high mortality.Infection become worse in patients with pre-existing medical conditions. Hospitals increased the number of critical care units in order to stabilize the pandemic's crisisand to minimize person to person transmission, installation of telemedicine networks, distant workers and internet-based health visits. Objective: To assess the acceptability, attitude and utilization towards telemedicine among COVID19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: In Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Rahim Yar Khan, a telemedicine network was quickly set during COVID-19 epidemic. A descriptive cross-sectional study comprising 144 study subjects aged between 34-58 year who seek telemedicine problems of surgery, cardiology, ENT, dermatology, gynaecology and obstetrics, pulmonology, medicine and paediatrics. Results: Out of 144 study subjectswith telemedicine consultation percent distribution of ENT and pulmonology was (48) 33.3% followed by medicine, gynaecology and obstetrics, dermatology, pediatrics and surgery.Patient's satisfaction level was 62.5% in cardiac patients. In department of gynaecology and obstetrics patients satisfaction towards telemedicine was 88.9%, (65%) patients in medicine were satisfied, followed by surgery 41.7%. Gender wise distribution showed 64.1% males were satisfied followed by 61.3% females Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic is creating a historic global challenge for health care providers, patients, and societies. Telemedicine is now widely available at low-cost, and broadly acceptable by physicians and patients. Current study highlights the use of telemedicine and effective applications throughout COVID-19 crisis. Telemedicine played an important role for medical practitioners to manage the COVID-19 situation.

19.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(8):192-195, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067748

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the pattern of surgical emergencies and surgical care provided during COIVD 19 pandemic. Study design: Cross-sectional Study Place and duration of study: Department of Surgery, CMH, Lahore from 15th March - 15 June 2020. Methodology: Data was collected retrospectively, of all the patients who were admitted in department of surgery over the duration of 3 months. Demographic variables, diagnosis, work up related to COVID-19, specialty of admission and surgical vs conservative management was recorded. Results: A total of 312 patients were included. Majority were male 216(69.2%). Most of the patients 191(61.2%) were admitted via clinic, predominantly in month of May 148(41%). COVID-19 PCR was done on 210 patients (67.3%), chest x-ray was done on 271(87.9%), HRCT chest was done on 113 patients (29.20%). Although general surgery was the busiest service line with a total patient admission of 89(43.1%), Orthopedic surgery top the operative interventions list with 85.1% of admissions underwent operative management. Conclusion: The current local guidelines about patient flow and management of patients in COVID crisis are practical and can be implemented. In the wake of the later waves of COVID 19 hospitals should prepare to divert their resources to high volume specialties like General and orthopedic surgery. Simple, but important procedures like arteriovenous fistula creation should only be stopped it there is shortage of manpower.

20.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(8):136-139, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067747

ABSTRACT

Background: The use of smart phones inside hospitals especially in clinically sensitive areas is a subject of debate because it may improve the quality of healthcare but can also be a vehicle of hospital acquired infections. Aim: To determine dentist's knowledge and behavior related to the use of smart phones in clinical environment and to determine the presence of microbial growth on these devices. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study in which validated survey tool was used to collect data about knowledge and behavior of 397 dental graduates from 8 dental colleges of Pakistan, regarding their usage of smart phones in clinical environment. Bacterial isolates were collected from the smart phones of 45 participants from Fatima Memorial Dental Hospital, Lahore. Results: The SPTC Scale was used to divide the participants into 3 categories;low, moderate and high users. The behavior related to smart phone usage in clinical environment was significantly different among the participants. Moderate users had significantly higher average behavior score of 3.7 (p-value = 0.034). The growth of pathogenic bacterial flora was greater on high users of smart phones (95%,) whereas those participants who were low users the percentage was 37%. Conclusion: Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are increasing significantly in number of patients and these can be prevented by adhering to proper hand hygiene practices and if hand hygiene is improved the amount of bacterial load will be less and disinfection of smart phone devices will not be required.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL