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1.
Voprosy Istorii ; 7(2):215-223, 2022.
Article in Russian | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2026513

ABSTRACT

Social, economic and political changes in society have actualized the problem of human migration. However, migration processes are not a new phenomenon, since they accompany human development constantly. It was in the second half of the 19th century that European countries began to keep records of people who migrated. At the same time, the COVID-19 pandemic has stirred up the world today, which, of course, has stopped the pace of migration processes, and the situation with the course of this disease in the world is very different, which can cause a new wave of migration of people to safer countries. In our opinion, it is relevant to pay attention to the effect of socio--cultural factors on the migrant's personality, which is reflected in adaptation and identification processes.

2.
Prev Sci ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2014320

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 led to widespread disruption of services that promote family well-being. Families impacted most were those already experiencing disparities due to structural and systemic barriers. Existing support systems faded into the background as families became more isolated. New approaches were needed to deliver evidence-based, low-cost interventions to reach families within communities. We adapted a family strengthening intervention developed in Kenya ("Tuko Pamoja") for the United States. We tested a three-phase participatory adaptation process. In phase 1, we conducted community focus groups including 11 organizations to identify needs and a community partner. In phase 2, the academic-community partner team collaboratively adapted the intervention. We held a development workshop and trained community health workers to deliver the program using an accelerated process combining training, feedback, and iterative revisions. In phase 3, we piloted Coping Together with 18 families, collecting feedback through session-specific surveys and participant focus groups. Community focus groups confirmed that concepts from Tuko Pamoja were relevant, and adaptation resulted in a contextualized intervention-"Coping Together"-an 8-session virtual program for multiple families. As in Tuko Pamoja, communication skills are central and applied for developing family values, visions, and goals. Problem-solving and coping skills then equip families to reach goals, while positive emotion-focused activities promote openness to change. Sessions are interactive, emphasizing skills practice. Participants reported high acceptability and appropriateness, and focus groups suggested that most content was understood and applied in ways consistent with the theory of change. The accelerated reciprocal adaptation process and intervention could apply across resource-constrained settings.

3.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 996, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1978776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is a significant public health problem globally and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) programmes are associated with improved psychological and clinical outcomes. There are currently no structured DSMES available in Ghana. We sought to adapt an evidence-based DSMES intervention for the Ghanaian population in collaboration with the local Ghanaian people. METHODS: We used virtual engagements with UK-based DSMES trainers, produced locally culturally and linguistically appropriate content and modified the logistics needed for the delivery of the self-management programme to suit people with low literacy and low health literacy levels. CONCLUSIONS: A respectful understanding of the socio-cultural belief systems in Ghana as well as the peculiar challenges of low resources settings and low health literacy is necessary for adaptation of any DSMES programme for Ghana. We identified key cultural, linguistic, and logistic considerations to incorporate into a DSMES programme for Ghanaians, guided by the Ecological Validity Model. These insights can be used further to scale up availability of structured DSMES in Ghana and other low- middle- income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Self-Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Ghana/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Humans , Self-Management/education
4.
J Prev (2022) ; 2022 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1935847

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic is broadly affecting the mental health and well-being of people around the world, and disproportionately affecting some groups with already pre-existing health inequities. Two groups at greater risk of physical and/or mental health detriments from COVID-19 and more profoundly impacted by the pandemic include frontline workers and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. To provide support and prevent long-term mental health problems, we culturally adapted a psychological first aid guide specifically for COVID-19 frontline workers serving AI/AN communities. We engaged a diverse, collaborative work group to steer the adaptation content and process. We also held two focus group discussions with frontline workers in AI/AN communities to incorporate their perspectives into the adapted guide. Results from the group discussions and the collaborative work group were compiled, analyzed to extract themes and suggestions, and integrated into the adapted content of the guide. Main adaptations included updating language (i.e., to be more culturally appropriate, less prescriptive, and less text heavy), framing the guide from a harm-reduction lens, incorporating cultural activities, values, and teachings common across diverse AI/AN communities (e.g., importance of being a good relative), and validating feelings and experiences of frontline workers. The resulting adapted guide includes four modules and is available as a free online training. Our adaptation process may serve as a guiding framework for future adaptations of similar resources for specific groups. The adapted guide may stand as an enduring resource to support mental well-being, the prevention of mental health problems, and reduction of health inequities during the pandemic and beyond.

5.
Child Adolesc Social Work J ; : 1-12, 2022 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1942053

ABSTRACT

Black children join kinship care disproportionately and black kin caregivers often face financial, housing, mental health, and parenting challenges when caring for relative children. Few interventions have been developed specifically for kin caregivers, let alone Black kin caregivers. This study evaluated the initial acceptability of an evidence based parenting intervention and worked to culturally adapt it for Black kin caregivers. The intervention was delivered in a family camp format. Feedback from participant interviews were analyzed for this study. Participants felt that overall the intervention was culturally appropriate. However, they also proposed changes to the curriculum, as well as to the process and format of the intervention. This study experienced challenges in terms of participant recruitment and sample size, which was exacerbated by COVID-19-related safety concerns. Future steps regarding recruitment, content, and format are discussed. Implications for child welfare practice, policy, and research are also provided.

6.
Chron Respir Dis ; 19: 14799731221104098, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886886

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has served to expose and amplify existing inequalities in chronic respiratory disease and the social determinants of health. In this article, we summarise evidence of existing disparities associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary rehabilitation; highlighting limitations of existing data. To reduce health inequalities in pulmonary rehabilitation, there is a need to identify and target factors influencing fair access and personal agency to engage. With consideration of the influence of culture on beliefs, expectations and health behaviours, we propose a renewed approach toward progressively achieving health equity in pulmonary rehabilitation based on principles of cultural safety and adaptation. This is a key priority in improving the quality of life of people living with chronic respiratory disease. Building comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation service delivery models based on an understanding of the holistic needs of the local population should be a priority for service providers and researchers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life
7.
Health Expect ; 25(3): 1016-1028, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861341

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Traditional advance care planning focuses on end-of-life planning in the context of a certain or imminent death. It is not tailored for serious illness planning, where the 'death' outcome is uncertain. The Plan Well Guide™ (PWG) is a decision aid that empowers lay persons to better understand different types of care and prepares them, and their substitute decision-makers, to express both their authentic values and informed treatment preferences in anticipation of serious illness. A cultural adaptation was necessary to make the material suitable to the context of Quebec, a French-speaking Canadian province. METHODS: We engaged lay collaborators and experts in a panel, involving three phases of consultation and data collection. These included an online questionnaire, focused interviews and virtual focus groups that identified elements within the francophone PWG affecting its feasibility, adaptation and integration, as well as items that should be modified. RESULTS: We engaged 22 collaborators between April and September 2021. The majority (82%) ranked the first translation as good or very good; most (70%) stated that they would recommend the final adaptation. Both lay and expert panel members suggested simplifying the language and framing the tool better within the context of other advance medical planning processes in Quebec. Translation was considered in a cultural context; the challenges identified by the research team or by collaborators were addressed during the focus group. Examples of wording that required discussion include translating 'getting the medical care that's right for you' when referring to the PWG's goal. An equivalent expression in the French translation was believed to invoke religious associations. Using the term 'machines' to describe life-sustaining treatments was also deliberated. CONCLUSION: Our collaborative iterative adaptation process led to the first French advanced serious illness planning tool. How acceptable and user-friendly this French adaptation of the PWG is in various Canadian French-speaking environments requires further study. CONTRIBUTION: We organized a focus group inviting both lay collaborators and experts to contribute to the interpretation of the results of the previous phases. This choice allowed us to add more value to our results and to the final PWG in French.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning , Canada , Decision Support Techniques , Humans , Quebec , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Violence Against Women ; 28(8): 1736-1749, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808095

ABSTRACT

As gender-based violence (GBV) surged during the COVID-19 pandemic, the 65th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW65) called for member states, civil, and other stakeholders to consider the specific needs of women and girls in COVID-19 response and recovery efforts. Psychology provides scientific knowledge to help answer this call. Despite existing global guidance and psychological research to mitigate GBV, COVID-19 presents new challenges for consideration. This article summarizes existing GBV guidance/research and COVID-19 considerations, uses an illustrative case study to describe Puerto Rico's application of GBV guidance/research during COVID-19, and provides preliminary policy and practice recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gender-Based Violence , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Puerto Rico
9.
PLoS ONE Vol 16(8), 2021, ArtID e0254595 ; 16(8), 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1801171

ABSTRACT

Background: In the Arab countries, there has not been yet a specific validated Arabic questionnaire that can assess the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine among the general population. This study, therefore, aimed to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the 5C scale into the Arabic language. Methods: The 5C scale was translated into Arabic by two independent bilingual co-authors, and then translated back into English. After reconciling translation disparities, the final Arabic questionnaire was disseminated into four randomly selected Arabic countries (Egypt, Libya, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Saudi Arabia). Data from 350 Arabic speaking adults (aged >= 18 years) were included in the final analysis. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was determined by concurrent, convergent, discriminant, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results: Age of participants ranged between 18 to 73 years;57.14% were females, 37.43% from Egypt, 36.86%, from UAE, 30% were healthcare workers, and 42.8% had the intention to get COVID-19 vaccines. The 5 sub-scales of the questionnaire met the criterion of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha >= 0.7). The predictors of intention to get COVID-19 vaccines (concurrent validity) were young age and the 5C sub-scales. Convergent validity was identified by the significant inter-item and item-mean score of the sub-scale correlation (P < 0.001). Discriminant validity was reported as inter-factor correlation matrix (< 0.7). Kaiser- Meyer-Olkin sampling adequacy measure was 0.80 and Bartlett's sphericity test was highly significant (P < 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the 15 items of the questionnaire could be summarized into five factors. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that the hypothesized five-factor model of the 15-item questionnaire was satisfied with adequate psychometric properties and fit with observed data (RMSEA = 0.060, GFI = 0.924, CFI = 0.957, TLI = 0.937, SRMR = 0.076 & NFI = 906). Conclusion: The Arabic version of the 5C scale is a valid and reliable tool to assess the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine among Arab population. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although Moral Distress (MD) is a matter of concern within the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), there is no validated Italian instrument for measuring the phenomenon in nurses and physicians who care for pediatric patients in Intensive Care. The authors of the Italian Moral Distress Scale-Revised (Italian MDS-R), validated for the adult setting, in 2017, invited further research to evaluate the generalizability of the scale to clinicians working in other fields. Our study aims to reduce this knowledge gap by developing and validating the pediatric version of the Italian MDS-R. METHODS: We evaluated the new instrument for construct validity, then we administered it in a multicenter, web-based survey that involved healthcare providers of three PICUs and three adult ICUs admitting children in northern, central, and southern Italy. Finally, we tested it for internal consistency, confirmatory factorial validity, convergent validity, and differences between groups analysis. RESULTS: The 14-item, three-factor model best fit the data. The scale showed good reliability (a = 0.87). Still, it did not correlate with the Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization sub-scales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) or with the 2-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC 2) or the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). A mild correlation was found between the Italian Pediatric MDS-R score and intention to resign from the job. No correlation was found between MD and years of experience. Females, nurses, and clinicians who cared for COVID-19 patients had a higher MD score. CONCLUSIONS: The Italian Pediatric MDS-R is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring MD among Italian health workers who care for critically ill children. Further research would be helpful in better investigating its applicability to the heterogeneous scenario of Italian Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Adult , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760572

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) processes (CompACT) is a 23-item self-report questionnaire assessing psychological flexibility, which is the overarching construct underpinning the ACT framework. We conducted a two-phase project to develop validated versions of the CompACT in three languages: phase 1-cross-cultural adaptation; and phase 2-psychometric validation of the questionnaire for use in Italy, Germany and Spain. This article focuses on the first phase. METHODS: We translated and culturally adapted the CompACT in the three target languages, following the ISPOR TCA Task Force guidelines. The process was overseen by a translation panel (three translators, at least two multiple sclerosis (MS) researchers and a lay person), ACT experts and clinicians from the research team of each country and the original CompACT developers. We debriefed the new questionnaire versions via face-to-face interviews with a minimum of four adults from the general population (GP) and four adults with MS in each country. RESULTS: The translation-adaptation process went smoothly in the three countries, with some items (7 in Italy, 4 in Germany, 6 in Spain) revised after feedback from ACT experts. Cognitive debriefing showed that the CompACT was deemed easy to understand and score in each target country by both GP and MS adults. CONCLUSIONS: The Italian, German and Spanish versions of the CompACT have semantic, conceptual and normative equivalence to the original scale and good content validity. Our findings are informative for researchers adapting the CompACT and other self-reported outcome measures into multiple languages and cultures.


Subject(s)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , Multiple Sclerosis , Adult , Humans , Language , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Translating , Translations
12.
4th International Conference on Information and Communications Technology, ICOIACT 2021 ; : 248-251, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1741217

ABSTRACT

Chatbots are a highly developed technology, especially in the current COVID-19 pandemic to apply contactless activities. Unfortunately, most of companies that have been implemented chatbot has failed gained benefit from the chatbot. This shows companies need to evaluate usability of the chatbot. One of specific questionnaire to evaluate usability of chatbot is Chatbot Usability Questionnaire (CUQ). Currently CUQ is only available in English and there is no research that provides CUQ in the Indonesian version. This research focuses on translating CUQ and producing a reliable Indonesian version of CUQ. CUQ needs to be adapted naturally into Indonesian so it can be understood by all types of users. Cross-cultural adaptation approach is used to translate CUQ to Indonesia. The reliability test was run with 100 respondents and resulted in Cronbach's alpha value of 0.749. This value indicated that CUQ is reliable and can be used in chatbot research and evaluation. © 2021 IEEE

13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725780

ABSTRACT

Migrant communities are often under-served by mental health services. Lack of community engagement results in missed opportunities for mental health promotion and early intervention, delayed care, and high rates of untreated psychological distress. Bilingual clinicians and others who work with these communities lack linguistically and culturally appropriate resources. This article reports on the implementation and evaluation of a community-based group mindfulness program delivered to Arabic and Bangla-speaking communities in Sydney, Australia, including modifications made to the content and format in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The program was positioned within a stepped-care model for primary mental health care and adopted a collaborative regional approach. In addition to improved mental health outcomes for face-to-face and online program participants, we have documented numerous referrals to specialist services and extensive diffusion of mindfulness skills, mostly to family members, within each community. Community partnerships were critical to community engagement. Training workshops to build the skills of the bilingual health and community workforce increased the program's reach. In immigrant nations such as Australia, mainstream mental health promotion must be complemented by activities that target specific population groups. Scaled up, and with appropriate adaptation, the group mindfulness program offers a low-intensity in-language intervention for under-served communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Australia , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686731

ABSTRACT

The Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT) has been gaining increased attention as a sound and innovative instrument in its conceptualization of burnout. BAT has been adapted for several countries, revealing promising validity evidence. This paper aims to present the psychometric properties of the Brazilian and Portuguese versions of the BAT in both the 23-item and 12-item versions. BAT's validity evidence based on the internal structure (dimensionality, reliability, and measurement invariance) and validity evidence based on the relations to other variables are the focus of research. A cross-sectional study was conducted with two non-probabilistic convenience samples from two countries (N = 3103) one from Brazil (nBrazil = 2217) and one from Portugal (nPortugal = 886). BAT's original structure was confirmed, and it achieved measurement invariance across countries. Using both classic test theory and item response theory as frameworks, the BAT presented good validity evidence based on the internal structure. Furthermore, the BAT showed good convergent evidence (i.e., work engagement, co-worker support, role clarity, work overload, and negative change). In conclusion, the psychometric properties of the BAT make this freely available instrument a promising way to measure and compare burnout levels of Portuguese and Brazilian workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Portugal , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Pharos Journal of Theology ; 102(Special Issue 2), 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1675691

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 has brought about unsuspected possibilities and death on a large global scale since its advent on the shores of the global community in early March of 2020. The novel pandemic has undoubtedly challenged and changed the normative operations of the social, political and economic activities all across the globe. Religious fraternities and activities have experienced challenging dynamics in how fellowship and worship are practised. Businesses and the entertainment industry have their share of suffering and enduring the suspending effect that has since been forcefully occasioned by the strategic global lockdown. The labour market metrics have realised a drastic decline due to companies closing down owing to the challenges that Covid-19 has rendered against their financial fragility and profit share. Academic institutions have also seen drastic challenges and a need for change in how they perform their curricula duties in the unpredictable context of Covid-19. Evidently, the advent of the Coronavirus has pointedly offered the nations of the world an opportunity to re-imagine a number of issues and social conducts. With millions of people dying across the globe, funerals have taken a new, strange turn in how the rites of passage for the deceased are practised. In light of this, the current essay presents the argument around re-imagining funerary rites in the Covid-19 context. The paper adopts Victor Tuner’s theoretical assumptions of ritual purported in his text entitled The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure, so as to theoretically problematise the idea of re-imagining funerary rites in the undesirable ‘new normal’? situation of Covid-19. © 2021 Open Access/Author/s - Online @ http//: www.pharosjot.com

16.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 6(1): 47, 2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546805

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has brought about political, economic, cultural, and interspecies problems far from medical areas, which challenges academia to rethink global health. For holism principle, anthropology offers valuable insights into these health issues, including the political economy of inequality, cultural diversity, and cultural adaptations, as well as the study of multispecies ethnography. These perspectives indicate that unequal political and economic systems contribute to health problems when people acknowledge disease and illness mechanisms. Moreover, cultural diversity and cultural adaptation are essential for providing appropriate medical solutions. Lastly, as a research method of studying interspecies relationships, multispecies ethnography promotes one health and planetary health from the ultimate perspective of holism. In conclusion, global health is not only a bio-medical concept but also involves political economy, culture, and multispecies factors, for which anthropology proffers inspiring theories and methods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Anthropology , Anthropology, Cultural , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Trends Psychiatry Psychother ; 43(4): 329-334, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181888

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Studies based on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) theory are conducted to identify ways to improve strategies aimed at preventing and combatting certain conditions or diseases, to understand the way how behavioral changes are assimilated by the populations, and to reorient interventions. In view of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, studies based on KAP theory have been useful to better understand certain behaviors, such as adherence to prevention measures and control of the spread of the virus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation of two complementary instruments for assessing KAP regarding the COVID-19 pandemic in the Brazilian population. METHODS: Two independent translators proposed a first Brazilian Portuguese version of the scales. The cultural adaptation and pre-test of the Brazilian Portuguese versions occurred at different stages, using a panel of specialists and a subsample of the target population, respectively. RESULTS: The pre-test of the adapted instruments involved 30 Brazilian adults (mean age = 41.8 years; standard deviation = 4.24) and was carried out to assess instrument understanding and applicability. The participants informed they did not have difficulties to self-complete the instruments and reported a high level of clarity and understanding. CONCLUSION: Both instruments can bring an opportunity to study behavioral constructs about COVID-19 in the Brazilian population, aiming to articulate strategies that enable the fulfillment of effective preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Translations
18.
Brain Sci ; 11(2)2021 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085118

ABSTRACT

The Sniffin' Sticks Olfactory Identification Test is a tool for measurement of olfactory performance developed in Germany and validated in several countries. This research aims to develop the Spanish version of the Sniffin' Sticks Olfactory Identification Test and obtain normative values for the Spanish population. The parameters are free recall and subjective intensity of odorants are included. The influence of possible demographic covariates such as sex, age, smoking, or educational level are analyzed, and the items that best discriminate are studied. In addition, the internal structure validity of the blue and purple versions is studied as a parallel measure, and a cultural adaptation of the purple version is carried out. For this, three independent samples of normosmic healthy volunteers were studied. To obtain normative values, the sample was of 417 participants (18-89 years). For the internal structure validity study of both versions, the sample was 226 (18-70 years), and for familiarity of the purple version, the sample was 75 participants (21-79 years). Results indicated that men and women and smokers and non-smokers perform equally. However, differences were found as age progresses, being more pronounced after 60 years old in all three measurements of the identification test. This research also provides the items that best discriminate in the blue version and a cultural adaptation for the purple version. In conclusion, the Sniffin' Sticks Odor Identification Test is a suitable tool for olfactory assessment in the Spanish population. The instrument has been expanded with two new scores, and normative data as a function of age are provided. Its parallel version also seems appropriate for testing, as items have been culturally adapted and evidence of internal structure validity for both versions is reported.

19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(3)2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049017

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of back pain (BP) among children and adolescents has increased over recent years. Some authors advocate promoting back-health education in the school setting. It is therefore important to adopt a uniform suite of assessment instruments to measure the various constructs. The present study aimed to perform a cultural adaptation of a validated measurement instrument (BackPEI), beginning with a translation and cultural adaptation phase, followed by a second phase to test reliability using a test-retest design. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation were performed based on the guidelines. Reliability was tested by applying the questionnaire to 224 secondary school students, at two different times with a 7-day interval between the tests. In general, the Spanish version presented adequate agreement for questions 1-20, with only question 9 achieving a low Kappa range of 0.312 (-0.152-0.189). The question about pain intensity did not show differences between the test means (4.72 ± 2.33) and re-test (4.58 ± 2.37) (p = 0.333), and the responses for these two tests obtained a high correlation (ICC = 0.951 (0.928-0.966); p = 0.0001). Psychometric testing indicated that the Spanish version of the BackPEI is well-adapted and reliable, based on the test-retest design, providing similar results to the original Brazilian version.


Subject(s)
Back Pain , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Adolescent , Back Pain/epidemiology , Brazil , Child , Humans , Posture , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
JMIR Form Res ; 4(10): e19887, 2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Developing a digital health innovation can require a substantial amount of financial and human resource investment before it can be scaled for implementation across geographical, cultural, and health care contexts. As such, there is an increased interest in leveraging eHealth innovations developed and tested in one country or jurisdiction and using these innovations in local settings. However, limited knowledge exists on the processes needed to appropriately adapt digital health innovations to optimize their transferability across geographical, cultural, and contextual settings. OBJECTIVE: We report on the results of an adaptation study of Horyzons, a digital health innovation originally developed and tested in Australia. Horyzons is designed to prevent relapses and support recovery in young people receiving services for first-episode psychosis (FEP). The aim of this study is to assess the initial acceptability of Horyzons and adapt it in preparation for pilot testing in Canada. METHODS: This research took place in 2 specialized early intervention clinics for FEP, located in 1 urban and 1 urban-rural setting, in 2 Canadian provinces. A total of 26 participants were recruited: 15 clinicians (age range 26-56 years) and 11 patients (age range 19-37 years). Following the digital health adaptation framework developed by our team, we used a mixed methods approach, combining descriptive quantitative and qualitative methods across 3 stages of data collection (focus groups, interviews, and consultations), analysis, and adaptations. RESULTS: Overall, patients and clinicians appreciated the strengths-based approach and social media features of Horyzons. However, participants expressed concerns related to implementation, especially in relation to capacity (eg, site moderation, crisis management, internet speed in rural locations). They also provided suggestions for adapting content and features, for example, in relation to community resources, volume of text, universal accessibility (eg, for individuals with limitations in vision), and optimization of platform accessibility through mobile devices. Additional aspects of the innovation were flagged for adaptation during the final stages of preparing it for live implementation. These included terms of use, time zone configuration to reflect local time and date, safety and moderation protocols, the need help now feature, and the list of trigger words to flag posts indicative of potential risk. CONCLUSIONS: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and public health guidelines for social distancing, there is an increasing interest and need to leverage the internet and mobile technologies for delivering youth mental health services. As countries look to one another for guidance on how to navigate changing social dynamics, knowledge on how to utilize and adapt existing innovations across contexts is now more important than ever. Using a systematic approach, this study illustrates the methods, processes, results, and lessons learned on adapting a digital health innovation to enhance its local acceptability. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/resprot.8810.

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