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1.
Respirology ; 27(SUPPL 1):137, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816638

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Aim: To determine (1) the influenza vaccine uptake of children with cystic fibrosis from 2016 to 2020 and (2) the impact of the COVID pandemic of 2020 and increased uptake of Telehealth outpatient appointments on vaccination rates. Methods: A retrospective audit of children with cystic fibrosis aged 6 months to 18 years who reside in South Australia was performed using the Women's and Children's Respiratory Department cystic fibrosis database from 2016 to 2020. The Australian Childhood Immunization Record (ACIR) was used to determine vaccination status during this period. Results: One hundred eighty-two children with cystic fibrosis were identified, 172 of whom vaccination records were available on the ACIR. Proportion of eligible patients who were vaccinated ranged from 66% to 88% over the 5 year period. There was nil significant decrease in uptake during the COVID pandemic in 2020 (75%). Despite the introduction of Telehealth reviews in 2020 majority (66%) of patients continued to have exclusive face-to-face appointments, of which 73% received the vaccination. Vaccination coverage of those who received combination of Telehealth and faceto- face was 81%. Conclusion: The high influenza vaccination rate of South Australian children with cystic fibrosis is consistent with rates seen in other tertiary centres globally. This audit demonstrated that the COVID pandemic and introduction of Telehealth appointments did not have any measurable uptake of the influenza vaccination our South Australian population.

2.
Respirology ; 27(SUPPL 1):77, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816630

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Aim: We are seeing the rapid emergence of a significant new threat to CF survival;chronic nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection. This study aims to understand the aetiology and epidemiology of NTM in Australians with CF. Methods: Nationally, nine adult and nine paediatric CF services prospectively collected respiratory samples from people with CF (pwCF) for acid fast bacilli (AFB) culture at regular clinic appointments (Baseline, 6 months, 1 year, then annual to 4 years);associated clinical data, geographic and social data was also collected. Sites commenced recruitment between December 2016 and August 2018. Retrospective clinical and culture data were also collected to offset the shift to a telehealth model of care during the global coronavirus pandemic. Results: 15.1% of 1322 study participants cultured NTM (NTM+) from at least one AFB culture during the study, 5.1% of study participants were M. abscessus (MABS) positive. Adolescents and young adults (11-25 years) had the highest rates of NTM infection (19%, p = 0.0004). MABS was more commonly isolated in participants <25 years (6.7%) compared to participants 25 years and older (2.5%, p < 0.001). Of NTM+ study participants, 49% were incident cases. The species of NTM recovered from participants varied depending on the Australian state of residence, with South Australia, Western Australia and Tasmania having greater diversity of isolated species. Conclusion: In Australia, during this sampling period pwCF <25 years of age were more likely to be infected with MABS than older pwCF. We hypothesize that this may be due to increasing attempts at eradication of Pa in early life and/or increased exposure from environmental sources at a vulnerable age.

3.
Respirology ; 27(SUPPL 1):15, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816628

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Aim: In March 2020, the Federal government announced restrictions related to the SARS-CoV-2 Global pandemic. These restrictions significantly reduced face-to-face clinics and numbers of patients coming to our tertiary paediatric laboratory for testing. Switch to telehealth platforms removed the ability for objective measurements at the time of review for important patient cohorts such as severe Asthma and Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Home spirometers were introduced but quality assurance around these devices was unknown, so we aimed to investigate agreement between these devices and existing laboratory equipment. Methods: At the time of a single face-to-face review, with the same respiratory scientist, in random order, patients performed spirometry with both home spirometers (Spirohome Personal, Infolab, Ultrasonic flow metrebased, Turkey) and laboratory equipment (Vyaire Body Box™, Ultrasonic flow metre-based, or Vyaire Pneumotachograh™, Pneumotach flow metre-based;Germany). Agreement was assessed using paired t-tests and Bland-Altman (data not shown) as an entire cohort, and as separate CF and Asthma subgroups. Results: Forty-three subjects recruited including 27 CF and 16 Asthma. Mean (SD;range) age was 13.9 (2.76;7.4-18.2) years for the entire cohort. Mean (SD) difference [defined as Vyaire-Spirohome] in FEV1 was 0.025(0.077)L (p = 0.04) and FVC 0.034(0.097)L (p = 0.002). Corresponding percent differences were 1.0 (3.30)% and 1.20(3.50)%. On examining the subgroups, differences were statistically significant for CF but not asthmatic subjects: CF subgroup age 13.5(3.05;7.4-18.0) years, FEV1 difference 0.040(0.069)L (p = 0.005) and FVC difference 0.052(0.097)L (p = 0.01);Asthma subgroup age 14.6 (2.11;11.3-18.2) years, FEV1 difference 0.001 (0.086)L (p = 0.98) and FVC difference 0.005 L (0.092) (p = 0.83). Corresponding percent differences were 1.6 (3.2)% and 1.7(3.3)% for CF and - 0.0(3.4)% and 0.2(3.7)% for asthma. Conclusion: Strong agreement was observed between the home and laboratory devices. Differences although statistically significant for the CF group, are within the accepted within-session test repeatability for spirometry indices.

4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1816045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections are closely monitored in people with cystic fibrosis (pwCF), with a special emphasis on severe cases. Previous studies used hospitalization rates as proxy for severity. METHODS: We evaluated data from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases diagnosed in French pwCF followed in one of the 47 French CF center over the first year of the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: criteria were applied for defining severity (e.g., respiratory failure and/or death). Data were compared to those from all French pwCF using the French CF Registry. RESULTS: As of April 30, 2021, 223 pwCF were diagnosed with COVID-19, with higher risks in adults (≥18 years, odds ratio [OR] = 2.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.82-3.48) and post-transplant individuals (OR = 2.68, 95% CI = 1.98-3.63). Sixty (26.9%) patients were hospitalized, with an increased risk in post-transplant individuals (OR = 4.74, 95% CI = 2.49-9.02). In 34 (15%) cases, COVID-19 was considered severe;28/60 (46.7%) hospitalizations occurred in patients without objective criteria of severity. Severe cases occurred mostly in adults (85.3%) and post-transplant pwCF (61.8%, OR = 6.02, 95% CI = 2.77-13.06). In non-transplanted pwCF, risk factors for severity included low lung function (median ppFEV1 54.6% vs. 75.1%, OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08) and CF-associated diabetes (OR = 3.26, 95% CI = 1.02-10.4). While most cases recovered without sequelae (n = 204, 91.5%), 16 (13%) were followed for possible sequelae, and three post-transplant females died. CONCLUSIONS: Severe COVID-19 cases occurred infrequently during the first year of the pandemic in French pwCF. Non-transplanted adults with severe respiratory disease or diabetes and post-transplant individuals were at risk for severe COVID-19. Thus, specific preventive measures should be proposed.

5.
Antibiotics ; 11(4):515, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1809658

ABSTRACT

Outpatient treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections is challenged by increasing rates of resistance to fluoroquinolones, the only class of antibiotics which offers an established oral route of administration against this organism. Azithromycin does not demonstrate activity against P. aeruginosa when evaluated under standard methods of susceptibility testing with bacteriologic media. However, growing evidence shows that azithromycin is very active against P. aeruginosa when using physiologic media that recapitulate the in vivo milieu and is supported by animal models of infection and various clinical settings, including cystic fibrosis. We present three cases of outpatient management of P. aeruginosa otolaryngological infections successfully treated with oral azithromycin, 500 mg daily ranging from 3–8 weeks, where use of fluoroquinolones was not possible due to either resistance or patient intolerance. We review the previous data supporting this clinical approach, in the hope that this will alert clinicians to this treatment option and to inspire a more thorough clinical trial evaluation of azithromycin in this environment of growing medical need.

6.
Clinical Case Reports ; 10(4):e05782, 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1802100

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary infections represent the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report a 3-month-old infant with pancreatic insufficient CF was hospitalized with positive RT-PCR test for COVID-19. He was treated successfully. Hypertonic saline can be hypothesized as a treatment regimen against COVID-19 infection after further investigations.

7.
International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research and Allied Sciences ; 11(1):55-60, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1798535

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to draw attention to the treatment of respiratory diseases in the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, we want to address the issue of vaccination, to pay attention to the incidence of disease among children. The design of this study was longitudinal. For this purpose, we use articles and studies from English-language sources, such as UpToDate, as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles from medical journals and the results of surveys of outpatient medical practitioners. There were no particular changes in the pharmacotherapy of respiratory diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. Changes occurred in the recommendations for aerosol delivery of the drug, and it was recommended that the use of targeted therapy and the use of antileukotriene drugs for bronchial asthma with positive COVID be delayed until recovery. Covid is changing the doctor-patient communication system today, giving rise to telemedicine. He reminds us of the importance of vaccination in pandemics if it is possible, and it is already possible, and of the importance of population immunity. And also, we should not forget about the therapy of other diseases and consider the conditions of a pandemic when making treatment decisions.

8.
Archivos de Bronconeumología ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1797166

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic. Till now, it affected 452.4 million (Spain, 11.18 million) persons all over the world with a total of 6.04 million of deaths (Spain, 100,992). It is observed that 75% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients have at least one COVID-19 associated comorbidity. It was shown that people with underlying chronic illnesses are more likely to get it and grow seriously ill. Individuals with COVID-19 who have a past medical history of cardiovascular disorder, cancer, obesity, chronic lung disease, diabetes, or neurological disease had the worst prognosis and are more likely to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia. COVID-19 can affect the respiratory system in a variety of ways and across a spectrum of levels of disease severity, depending on a person's immune system, age and comorbidities. Symptoms can range from mild, such as cough, shortness of breath and fever, to critical disease, including respiratory failure, shock and multi-organ system failure. So, COVID-19 infection can cause overall worsening of these previous respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, etc. This review aims to provide information on the impact of the COVID-19 disease on pre-existing lung comorbidities. Resumen El 11 de marzo de 2020, la Organización Mundial de la Salud declaró la enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) como pandemia. Hasta ahora, ha afectado a 452,4 millones (en España, 11,18 millones) de personas en todo el mundo, con un total de 6,04 millones de muertes (en España, 100.992). Se observa que el 75% de los pacientes hospitalizados por COVID-19 tienen al menos una morbilidad concomitante a esta enfermedad. Se ha demostrado que las personas con enfermedades crónicas subyacentes tienen más probabilidades de contraerla y enfermar gravemente. Los individuos con COVID-19 con antecedentes de trastorno cardiovascular, cáncer, obesidad, enfermedad pulmonar crónica, diabetes o enfermedad neurológica tienen el peor pronóstico, y son más propensos a sufrir el síndrome de dificultad respiratoria aguda o neumonía. La COVID-19 puede afectar al sistema respiratorio de diversas maneras y en un espectro de gravedades de la enfermedad, dependiendo del sistema inmunitario de la persona, la edad y las comorbilidades. Los síntomas pueden ir desde los más leves, como tos, dificultad para respirar y fiebre, hasta los más graves, como insuficiencia respiratoria, shock y fallo multiorgánico. Así, la infección por COVID-19 puede generar un empeoramiento general de estas enfermedades respiratorias previas, como asma, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, enfermedad pulmonar intersticial, etc. Esta revisión tiene como objetivo proporcionar información sobre el impacto de la enfermedad por COVID-19 en las comorbilidades pulmonares preexistentes.

9.
Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation ; 41(4):S424-S425, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1796808

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Telemedicine has been successfully employed in a wide range of specialties. We hereby present the results of a pivotal study we ran in our centre just before the COVID19 pandemic. Methods: This was a prospective study including all adult cystic fibrosis patients who underwent lung transplant (LuTx) from September 2017 to August 2019. Patients were randomized into two groups;patients assigned to the first arm (intervention) received a home medical assistant (HMA) system device, to which a pulse oximeter and a spirometer with reusable turbine were integrated;they were asked to perform a spirometry and register their SpO2 at rest and on effort on a twice-weekly basis. All the data were digitally transmitted to our centre, where physiotherapists and physicians were able to analyse them real-time. Both the groups received traditional hospital-based follow-up. Results: 32 patients were enrolled, 16 in each group. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups (see Table 1).With reference to the telemonitoring group:- Adherence to telemonitoring significantly decreased during the 12months period of follow up (see figure 1).- Hospital reported data were consistent with the last being registered with the HMA device.- Of note, two patients were requested to anticipate their hospital routine visit because of a FEV1 decrease being reported on their HMA device, in order to rule out possible acute lung allograft dysfunction.- 13 out of 16 patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with the telemonitoring experience. Conclusion: The COVID19 pandemic highlighted the necessity to investigate alternative practices to treat chronically ill individuals. In our study, telemonitoring proved to be a valuable tool to improve quality health care to LuTx recipients, especially for those who live far from the transplant centre. We are now implementing this approach scheduling online video consultations. Further research should be focused on standardizing quality of telemedicine services.

10.
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being ; 17(1):2062820, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1795455

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study explores the concept of social connectedness for adults with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), generally and during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, to help inform contemporary CF healthcare. Social connectedness is an essential component of belonging and refers to an individual's sense of closeness with the social world. Unique disease factors make exploration of social connectedness pertinent, added to by COVID-19, with the CF population potentially facing increased risk for severe illness. METHODS: Seventeen adults with CF in Western Australia undertook interviews, with findings categorized as overarching themes. RESULTS: In a general sense, participants described social connectedness challenges caused by CF, despite which they reported meaningful connections that benefits their mental and physical health. Within a COVID-19 specific context, participants demonstrated resilience in the face of adversity, highlighted the importance of empathy in relation to the pandemic, and described how social support is both an outcome and enhancer of social connectedness. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to limited social connectedness literature within CF and chronic illness in general, highlighting the importance of social connectedness awareness raising, assessments and interventions in CF healthcare inside and outside the COVID-19 pandemic.

12.
Respirology ; 27:140-140, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1762590
13.
Respirology ; 27:188-188, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1762562
14.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(3)2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760305

ABSTRACT

Due to the alarming spread of bacterial resistance to conventional drugs, the sole use of antibiotics to fight lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) is not resolutive, and novel strategies to replace or complement the use of antibiotics are highly desirable. Among these strategies, the use of probiotics is emerging as a particularly attractive approach. Probiotic administration via the oral route has demonstrated an ability to improve lung function and to reduce infection and exacerbation rates in CF patients through mechanisms mainly attributable to the gut-lung axis. Nevertheless, some studies reported no beneficial effect of probiotic intake suggesting that there is margin for improvement of such innovative intervention in CF. The present review aims to address the rationale behind probiotic use in CF and discuss the hypothesis that nasal/aerosol administration of appropriate probiotic strains may help to exert a direct beneficial effect on the respiratory tract, increasing the effectiveness of probiotic interventions in CF patients.

15.
J Clin Med ; 11(6)2022 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753640

ABSTRACT

Whether the COVID-19 pandemic may have modified the clinical planning and course in bronchiectasis patients remains to be fully elucidated. We hypothesized that the COVID-19 pandemic may have influenced the management and clinical outcomes of bronchiectasis patients who were followed up for 12 months. In bronchiectasis patients (n = 30, 23 females, 66 years), lung function testing, disease severity [FEV1, age, colonization, radiological extension, dyspnea (FACED), exacerbation (EFACED)] and dyspnea scores, exacerbation numbers and hospitalizations, body composition, sputum microbiology, and blood analytical biomarkers were determined at baseline and after a one-year follow-up. Compared to baseline (n = 27, three patients dropped out), in bronchiectasis patients, a significant increase in FACED and EFACED scores, number of exacerbations, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was observed, while FEV1, ceruloplasmin, IgE, IgG, IgG aspergillus, IgM, and IgA significantly decreased. Patients presenting colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) remained unchanged (27%) during follow-up. In bronchiectasis patients, FEV1 declined only after a one-year follow-up along with increased exacerbation numbers and disease severity scores, but not hospitalizations. However, a significant decrease in acute phase-reactants and immunoglobulins was observed at the one-year follow-up compared to baseline. Despite the relatively small cohort, the reported findings suggest that lung function impairment may not rely entirely on the patients' inflammatory status.

16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753481

ABSTRACT

The aims of this study were to (1) determine the feasibility of a home-based resistance exercise training (RET) program in patients with cystic fibrosis and impaired glucose tolerance using virtual personal training and (2) observe the effects completion of the RET program had on glucose metabolism, pulmonary function, body composition, and physical fitness. The feasibility of the program was defined as 80% compliance. Ten participants (15.80 ± 2.20 yr, 25.1 ± 7.4 kg/m2) began a home-based resistance training program consisting of 36 sessions supervised via online videoconferencing. Compliance scores of 78.9% (all participants) and 81.8% (without one outlier) were observed. A significant increase was observed in 2-h C-peptide levels (2.1 ng/mL; p = 0.04), with a moderate decrease in fasting glucose (-5.2 mg/dL; p = 0.11) and a moderate increase in 2-h insulin (35.0 U/mL; p = 0.10). A small decrease in the fat percentage (-1.3%; p = 0.03) was observed in addition to increases in fat-free mass (1.5 kg; p = 0.01) and the fat-free mass index (0.4; p = 0.01). Small, yet statistically significant increases were observed in V̇O2peak (0.1 L/min p = 0.01), V̇CO2peak (0.1 L/min; p = 0.01), and ventilation (5.3 L/min; p = 0.04). Telehealth-based RET is feasible in adolescents with CF and impaired glucose tolerance and elicits small yet favorable changes in insulin secretion, body composition, and exercise capacity.


Subject(s)
Cystic Fibrosis , Glucose Intolerance , Resistance Training , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Feasibility Studies , Glucose Intolerance/therapy , Humans
17.
Journal of Cystic Fibrosis ; 20:S118, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735135

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In 2018 a new Adult Cystic Fibrosis Diabetes (CFD) servicewas established within the Blackpool Victoria Hospital Adult Cystic Fibrosis Service (BACFS). Over 3 years the number of patients in the BACFS has increased, reflecting an increase in patients with CFD requiring more diabetes specialist time (see table). Demands on the service were further impacted during the COVID-19 restrictions;however, this also inadvertently enhanced engagement between patients and the CFD service. Methods: 1. Designated CFD Clinics 2. Annual review 3. Policies and resources 4. Ongoing education of patients and clinicians (Table Presented) Results: 1. Designated clinics 2 Weekly CFD multidisciplinary team (MDT) review including Libre View discussions, new & transition patient clinics, follow-up clinic alternating with 2 weekly nurse-led clinics All patients with CFD have a Libre sensor fitted and share data 2. Annual review Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Libre view used for screening of CFD 2 weekly CFD MDT meeting to discuss Libre View data Discussion at CFD MDT re: diagnosis & treatment 3. Policies and resources Local and National protocols followed to screen for CFD and initiate early treatment Established resources for new patients starting insulin 4. Ongoing education of patients and clinicians Upskilled CF team regarding CFD annual review Contribute to journal club, local meetings and education for other specialities Joint working agreement with antenatal service at BVH Conclusion: There have been challenges to establish a CFD service around staffing hours, accommodation and cross cover. COVID-19 had further impacted this but the introduction of virtual working has increased patient contact without the need for face-to-face consultations. Further development is centred on working with local paediatric centres for the transition of patients and introduction of virtual, structured group education.

18.
Journal of Cystic Fibrosis ; 20:S114, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735133

ABSTRACT

Objectives: COVID-19 brought a huge change in working practices. The increase in available technology within the NHS opened up opportunities for engaging online with groups of patients with CF which previously wouldn’t have been possible. Transition points are key in the development of young people (YP), even more so in YP with chronic illness (Reed-Knight, 2014). Moving to high school is one of the first transition points a YP will hit, but in 2020 this was interrupted by COVID-19. Methods: ‘Click and Connect’was developed to determine the feasibility of online groups for YP with CF.We designed a closed, online group over 4 × 1 hour sessions. The group was facilitated by two qualified Clinical Psychologists, and a trainee Clinical Psychologist. Group sessions covered: Introductions and Ground rules;Stress and Strategies;Emotions and wellbeing;and Problem-solving skills. Sessions were structured to provide information, enable discussion, as well as practical ‘hands-on’ tasks. Packs were posted out each week with all materials required for each session. Results: 9 YP with CF were invited to the group, and 7 joined in total. The platform Zoom was used as it offered the best functions for group work whilst maintaining security. Parents consented to their children participating in the group;all correspondence was sent via the parents. Formal measures were not collected;instead we used the platform mentimeter to gauge feedback from the YP at the end of each session. Feedback from the YP was consistently positive. Conclusion: Despite some reservations about working online, and concerns over YP engagement, the online platform allowed more engagement than perhaps face-to-face might have. The YP appeared happy and comfortable working online, and functions such as the ‘chat’ allowed those who perhaps were wary of talking on camera to interact in the sessions. Following the success of this group, we will be further developing virtual groups for YP with CF.

19.
Journal of Cystic Fibrosis ; 20:S114, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735132

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of this project was to develop new transition resources to support young people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their families during a time that can be detrimental to health and well-being, and equip them with the skills needed to have a successful and supported transition. Methods: The Cystic Fibrosis Trust consulted with over 30 young people with CF and their parents to hear about their experiences of transition.We found that, overall, young people were excited about the opportunity for independence,while parents had reservations about passing responsibility onto their children. Parents and young people, the Trust’s Youth Advisory Group and Clinical Advisory Group, and a young key worker in CF paediatrics gave feedback on a proposal for the resources, and reviewed the resources through development and production. All feedback was shared with a design agency, who created designs for the resources. Due to restrictions around Covid-19, instead of using photography, the agency created illustrations and animations, using the tagline ‘Wewant you to feel listened to and empowered, whatever shape it takes!’ to represent the changes families go through during transition. The final resources include a booklet for young people and four activity sheets, a booklet for parents and carers, and an interactive ‘hub’ on the Trust’s website. Results: The resources were published and promoted in December 2020. Since their release, the resources have been ordered 76 times, and downloaded over 245 times. Feedback on the resources has been positive, and parents have shared their experiences of the challenges this time brought up for their families. Conclusion: Transition is a challenging time for young people with CF and their families. Our new resources make up-to-date information about the transition process available to the people who need it. The resources are available in different formats, and the information is bespoke to the audience reading it.

20.
Journal of Cystic Fibrosis ; 20:S109, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735131

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen cystic fibrosis (CF) working practice move to more remote clinical models. This study assesses theimpact of this shift in working patterns on the relationships betweenfamilies of young people with CF and CF multidisciplinary teams (MDT). Inaddition, the study also assessed parents’ perceptions of working remotely.Methods: Six semi-structured interviews with parents of young peopleunder the care of a regional UK CF specialist centre were analysed usinginductive content analysis.Results: Three domains emerged: Interpersonal Relationships, RemoteClinics and CF in the Context of COVID-19. The enduring and closerelationships between the MDT and families were discussed, includingchanges brought about by COVID-19 and changes in working practice.Discussion also focused on the acceptability of remote clinics movingforwards.Conclusions: The importance of the quality of the relationship betweenfamilies and CF MDTs is vital to enhance ongoing care with parentshighlighting key attributes in a successful working relationship. Remoteworking was acceptable in the context of COVID-19 and, with someconsiderations, could be useful moving forward

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