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1.
Romanian Journal of Neurology/ Revista Romana de Neurologie ; 21(2):172-178, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957675

ABSTRACT

Objective. Preliminary clinical data indicate that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with neurological symptoms. To compare the clinical features, imaging and treatments in patients with and without COVID 19. To compare the mortality and in-hospital stay among patients with and without COVID 19 and negative patients. Materials and methods. In this retrospective, single-center study, we included all the patients who attended the department of neurology with neurologic symptoms with confirmed COVID-19 and long COVID-19 from June 2020 to January 2021. Data on clinical signs, diagnosis, laboratory findings were collected and analyzed from the records for positive patients and compared with neurologic patients without COVID-19 admitted in the same period. Statistical analysis: The mean values between study groups were compared using an independent sample t-test and Mann Whitney u test. Categorical outcomes were compared using the Chi square test. Data was analyzed using coGuide soft-ware. Results. Headache was the common neurologic manifestation present in COVID positive patients compared to COVID negative patients (39.13%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in baseline parame-ters. Laboratory parameters like CRP, Serum Ferritin, LDH, D-dimer, ESR, and IL-6 showed a significant increase in COVID positive patients (P <0.05). In-hospital mortality was more in COVID positive patients than COVID negative patients (P <0.011). Conclusion. The study showed varied neurologic symptoms in COVID patients, with headache as the common symptom. Hospital stay, morbidity, mortality, and inflammatory parameters were more in COVID positive patients compared to COVID negative patients.

2.
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology ; 16(2):326-333, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957671

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 discovered in December 2019, Wuhan, China. It was transmitted globally producing the present COVID-19 pandemic. Concerns have been raised about the potential impact of COVID-19 on male reproductive organs and male fertility as the number of infections in the male community has increased. The objectives of current study are studying the relationship between the plasma levels of testosterone and the markers of immune reaction with the severity and mortality in a sample of COVID-19 patients. A cross section study included NO= 103 male patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, diagnosed by PCR and chest CT scan, (≥ 18 years old), and recovered in the respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). Several biochemical risk factors were determined Free Testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay(ELISA), D-dimer, Ferritin, CRP, Urea, Creatinine were measured by automated method by using Abbott Architect c4000 and Complete Blood Count(CBC). The results show that the serum free testosterone and SHBG levels a significant lower in non-survivor patients than survivor patients with COVID-19. While the other biomarkers (D-dimer, Ferritin, Urea, Creatinine) were significant higher in non-survivor patients than survivor patients. The CRP, WBC and lymphocyte showed that no significant between the both group of patients. In conclusion the study showed that lower free testosterone and SHBG levels enable significant role in increasing risk of COVID-19 mortality amongst adult male patients.

3.
Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956443

ABSTRACT

Objective: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a hyperinflammatory syndrome associated with multiorgan damage that occurs following coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Research on clinical and laboratory findings, and imaging studies, aiming to predict the progression to severe disease state is limited. This study recruited patients with MIS-C who presented with mild or severe symptoms from a single center in Turkey and evaluated factors related to their symptoms. Methods: This retrospective study included 25 pediatric patients with mild and severe presentations of MIS-C. We explored the differences in demographic and clinical data on clinical severity to understand their possible diagnostic and prognostic values. Results: Patients with MIS-C had cardiovascular symptoms (68%), gastrointestinal symptoms (64%), dermatologic/mucocutaneous findings (64%), lung involvement (36%), and neurological symptoms (16.0%). About 45.1% of patients with MIS-C had manifestations that overlapped with Kawasaki disease. Eleven patients (44%) were admitted to the intensive care unit, and one (4%) patient died. Grouping based on clinical severity did not differ statistically in terms of gender, age, height, weight, body mass index, and duration of hospital stay. Procalcitonin and ferritin levels correlated with disease severity. The receiver operating characteristic curve for D-dimer gave the highest value of area under the curve, among other biomarkers. The cutoff value for D-dimer was determined as more than 6780. Conclusions: Although COVID-19 is usually mild in children, some can be severely affected, and clinical severity in MIS-C can differ from mild to severe multisystem involvement. This study shows that procalcitonin, ferritin, and D-dimer levels may give us information about disease severity.

4.
American Journal of Stem Cells ; 11(3):37-55, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955743

ABSTRACT

Objective: Mesenchymal stem cells can serve as a therapeutic option for COVID-19. Their immunomodula-tory and anti-inflammatory properties can regulate the exaggerated inflammatory response and promote recovery of lung damage. Method: Phase-1, single-centre open-label, prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravenous administration of mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord and placenta in moderate COVID-19. The study was done in 2 stages with total 20 patients. Herein, the results of stage 1 including first 10 patients receiving 100 million cells on day 1 and 4 with a follow up of 6 months have been discussed. Results: No adverse events were recorded immediately after the administration of MSCs or on follow up. There was no deterioration observed in clinical, laboratory and radiological parameters. All symptoms of the study group resolved within 10 days. Levels of inflammatory biomarkers such as NLR, CRP, IL6, ferritin and D-dimer improved in all patients after intervention along with improved oxygenation demonstrated by improvement in the SpO2/FiO2 ratio and PaO2/FiO2 ratio. None of the patients progressed to severe stage. 9 out of 10 patients were discharged within 9 days of their admission. Improvements were noted in chest x-ray and chest CT scan scores at day 7 in most patients. No post-covid fibrosis was observed on chest CT 28 days after intervention and Chest X ray after 6 months of the intervention. Conclusion: Administration of 100 million mesenchymal stem cells in combina-tion with standard treatment was found to be safe and resulted in prevention of the cytokine storm, halting of the disease progression and acceleration of recovery in moderate COVID-19. This clinical trial has been registered with the Clinical Trial Registry-India (CTRI) as CTRI/2020/08/027043. http://www.ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/pmaindet2. php?trialid=43175.

5.
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacy ; 23(4):258-262, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955706

ABSTRACT

Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are rare serious disorders that affect the skin and mucous membranes. These reactions are most commonly caused by drugs and, rarely, infections. While discontinuing the offending drug and supportive care are primordial, there are no consensus treatment guidelines on the optimal use of systemic immunomodulatory agents. Here, we report a case of a 57-year-old woman, who had recently recovered from COVID-19 infection, with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap most likely triggered by dorzolamide eye drops. The patient was successfully treated with a single subcutaneous dose of etanercept combined with oral cyclosporine, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The progression of skin lesions ceased after administration of etanercept. In addition, a significant clinical improvement was observed a few days after treatment with immunoglobulins, without complications or important side effects.

6.
Int J Infect Dis ; 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To employ long-short-term-memory (LSTM) artificial-intelligence method to model multiple time points of clinical laboratory data, along with demographics and comorbidities, to predict hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) onset in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Montefiore Health System data consisted of 1,982 AKI and 2,857 no-AKI (NAKI) hospitalized COVID-19 patients and Stony Brook Hospital validation data consisted of 308 AKI and 721 NAKI hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Demographic, comorbidities, and longitudinal (3 days before AKI onset) laboratory tests were analyzed. LSTM was used to predict AKI with five-fold cross-validation (80%/20% for training/validation). RESULTS: The top predictors of AKI onset were glomerular filtration rate, lactate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and C-reactive protein. Longitudinal data yielded marked improvement in prediction accuracy over individual time points. Inclusion of comorbidities and demographics further improves prediction accuracy. The best model yielded an AUC, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity, respectively, to be 0.965±0.003, 89.57±1.64%, 0.95±0.03, and 0.84±0.05 for the Montefiore validation dataset, and 0.86±0.01, 83.66±2.53%, 0.66±0.10, 0.89±0.03 for the Stony Brook Hospital validation dataset. CONCLUSIONS: LSTM model of longitudinal clinical data accurately predicted AKI onset in COVID-19 patients. This approach could help heighten awareness for AKI complications and identify patients for early interventions to prevent long-term renal complications.

7.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(4): e728, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1955907

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: Abnormalities in hematological and biochemical markers are assumed to be associated with the progression of COVID-19 disease. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the consequences of abnormalities of biomarkers (D-dimers, C-reactive protein [CRP], serum ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], random blood sugar [RBS], absolute neutrophil count [ANC], neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), serum creatinine, and hemoglobin) in the Bangladeshi COVID-19 patients. Methods: The data of biomarker levels in Bangladeshi COVID-19 patients were gathered from five databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Bangladesh Journals Online between January 2020 to March 2022. Review Manager 5.4 was used for the meta-analysis, and Egger's test and Begg-Mazumdar's rank correlation were used to investigate publication bias. Results: This study included 1542 patients with 567 severe and 975 nonsevere statuses. Based on the accumulated data synthesis, there is a strong correlation between disease severity and different biomarkers, including D-dimer, CRP, ferritin, LDH, RBS, NLR, and serum creatinine (MD = 1.16, p = 0.0004; MD = 22.97, p = 0.003; MD = 419.26, p < 0.00001; MD = 118.37, p = 0.004; MD = 1.96, p = 0.02; MD = 1.26, p = 0.02; and MD = 0.31, p = 0.008, respectively). A significantly decreased correlation was observed for hemoglobin levels in severe COVID-19 patients (MD = -0.73, p = 0.10). Conclusion: The elevated biomarkers level was noticed in severe cases compared to nonsevere patients, revealing that D-dimer, CRP, ferritin, LDH, RBS, NLR, and serum creatinine are significantly correlated to COVID-19 severity. Only lower hemoglobin level was found to be associated with COVID-19 severity.

8.
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc ; 2022 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952162

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The second wave of COVID-19 in Indonesia occurred due to delta variant transmission with up to 2266 cases. This variant could cause higher rate of morbidities and mortalities. This study reported coagulation profile of COVID-19 patients with acute stroke and its association with patients' outcome. METHOD: This is a cohort-retrospective study conducted during the second wave of COVID-19, June-August 2021 in Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital. Inclusion criteria were adult patients with confirmed COVID-19 and diagnosed with acute stroke confirmed by radiological evidences. Exclusion criteria were COVID-19 patients with prior diagnosis of acute stroke. Coagulation factors were analyzed and presented with tables and graphs. RESULTS: A total of 33 patients included in this study with majority experienced ischemic stroke (84.8%), followed by ischemic with haemorrhagic transformation (9.1%), and the rest with haemorrhagic stroke. The median of fibrinogen and D-dimer was 487.1(147-8,943)mg/dL and 2,110(250-35,200)ug/L respectively. Prothrombin time (PT) ratio was 0.95(0.82-1.3) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) ratio was 1.01(0.64-2.72). On observation, 33.3% died during hospitalization, D-dimer value in these patients was significantly higher with 9,940ug/L compared to those who survived with 1,160ug/L(p = 0.009). The highest D-dimer value during hospitalization was also significantly higher with the median of 14,395ug/L compared to 3,740 ug/L (p = 0.014). DISCUSSION: D-dimer value on initial assessment and its highest value during hospitalization were significantly higher in patient with poor outcome, showing that D-dimer can be one predictor of mortality in COVID-19 patients with acute stroke.

9.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 2022 Jul 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951615

ABSTRACT

D-dimer is a fibrin degradation product encompassing multiple cross-linked D domains and/or E domains present in the original fibrinogen molecule, whose generation is only theoretically possible when hemostasis and fibrinolysis pathways are concomitantly activated. D-dimer measurement has now become a pillar in the diagnosis/exclusion and prognostication of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), when incorporated into validated clinical algorithms and especially using age-adjusted diagnostic thresholds. Although emerging evidence is also supporting its use for predicting the duration of anticoagulant therapy in certain categories of patients, the spectrum of clinical applications is constantly expanding beyond traditional thrombotic pathologies to the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection, acute intestinal ischemia and cerebral venous thrombosis among others, embracing also clinical management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Recent findings attest that D-dimer elevations are commonplace in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV-2) infection (especially in those with thrombosis), its value predicts the clinical severity (up to death) of COVID-19 and remains more frequently increased in COVID-19 patients with post-discharge clinical sequelae. Further, D-dimer-based anticoagulant escalation may be associated with a lower risk of death in patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection and, finally, D-dimer elevation post-COVID-19 vaccination mirrors an increased risk of developing vaccine-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (VITT).

10.
Circ Rep ; 4(5): 215-221, 2022 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951470

ABSTRACT

Background: To date, there are no large-scale data on the association between D-dimer levels at admission and the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Japanese patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods and Results: The CLOT-COVID study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study enrolling consecutive hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across 16 centers in Japan from April 2021 to September 2021. Among 2,894 enrolled patients, 2,771 (96%) had D-dimer levels measured at admission. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on tertiles of D-dimer levels at admission (1st tertile, D-dimer ≤0.5 µg/mL, n=949; 2nd tertile, D-dimer 0.51-1.09 µg/mL, n=894; 3rd tertile, D-dimer ≥1.1 µg/mL, n=928). The higher the tertile group, the more severe the COVID-19 status at admission. The incidence of VTE during hospitalization was highest in the 3rd tertile group (1st tertile, 0.3%; 2nd tertile, 0.3%; 3rd tertile, 3.6%; P<0.001). Even after adjusting for confounders in the multivariable logistic regression model, the higher D-dimer levels in the 3rd tertile (≥1.1 µg/mL) were independently associated with a higher risk of VTE during hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio 4.83 [95% confidence interval 1.93-12.11; P<0.001]; reference=1st tertile). Conclusions: Higher D-dimer levels at admission were associated with a higher risk of VTE events during hospitalization in Japanese patients with COVID-19. This could be helpful in determining patient-specific anticoagulation management strategies for COVID-19 in Japan.

11.
Indian J Surg ; : 1-8, 2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1943182

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was declared as pandemic by World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. The outbreak has caused 5,232,562 deaths worldwide until December 3rd, 2021. Though primarily affecting the respiratory system, involvement of other organ systems have been reported in severe disease. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been recognized as an important complication. Previous studies have reported the prevalence of VTE in intensive care unit (ICU) patients between 7 and 85% and in non-ICU patients between 0 and 19%. COVID-19 patients that are at high risk for VTE are also at increased risk for bleeding. In such cases, anticoagulation may potentially be harmful. Thereby, it is important to understand the risk factors for VTE predisposition in the COVID-19 patients, timing of VTE, and the rate of occurrence of VTE in hospitalized patients post-discharge. Comparison of the rate of occurrence of VTE in COVID-19 patients with the non-COVID-19 patients with similar disease severity is required to truly interpret the reportedly high rates of VTE in COVID-19 patients. Several pathophysiological mechanisms have been reported for the development of VTE in COVID-19. Autopsy-based studies have contributed to the existing knowledge. d-dimer, presently, seems to be the most suitable investigation for risk-identification of VTE supported by Doppler studies and overall clinical context. Further, prospective studies and clinical trials are essentially required to fill the gaps in evidence for occurrence, risk prediction and management of VTE in COVID-19 patients.

12.
Advances in Medical Sciences ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1935941

ABSTRACT

Purpose The aim of the study was to assess the coagulation and inflammatory markers connected with severe course of COVID-19 and no clinical improvement. Material and methods The study population included 2590 adult patients, diagnosed with COVID-19, selected from the SARSTer national database - an ongoing project led by the Polish Association of Epidemiologists and Infectiologists and supported by the Medical Research Agency. Clinical and laboratory parameters, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophil and lymphocyte count, procalcitonin, ferritin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), D-dimer concentration and platelet (PLT) count were analyzed before and after treatment (remdesivir, tocilizumab, dexamethasone, anticoagulants). Results Significant differences between patients with mild and severe course of the disease were observed in all examined parameters before treatment (p < 0.05). After treatment only ferritin concentration did not differ significantly. In patients with pulmonary embolism, CRP concentration, neutrophil count, D-dimer and IL-6 concentration were significantly higher than in patients without embolism (p < 0.05). The significant differences between the groups with and without fatal outcome were observed within all analyzed parameters. Significant differences in all examined parameters before treatment were observed between patients with and without clinical improvement (p < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression showed that no clinical improvement was associated with: IL-6>100 pg/ml (OR-2.14), D-dimer concentration over 1000 ng/ml (OR-1.62) and PLT count below 150,000/μl (OR-1.57). Conclusions Severe course of the disease is associated with lower PLT and lymphocyte count, higher D-dimer, CRP, neutrophil count and IL-6 concentration. The best predictors of no clinical improvement in COVID-19 are: IL-6>100 pg/ml, D-dimer>1000 ng/ml and PLT<150,000/μl.

13.
14.
American Journal of Blood Research ; 12(2):54-59, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935125

ABSTRACT

Objective: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus 2 (SaRS-Cov-2) associated respiratory disease (COVID-19), announced as a pandemic, is a multisystem syndrome. SARS-CoV-2 directly infects and damages vascular endothelial cells, which leads to microvascular dysfunction and promotes a procoagulant state. Dipyridamole (DP) acts as a reversible phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is used mainly as an antiplatelet agent. It is hypothetised that it has possible activities in COVID-19. Design and Methodology: We report our retrospective, real-world results of DP added to low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in the treatment of 462 clinically diagnosed and hospitalized COVID-19 patients. We compared anticoagulation with and without DP addition with no administration of anticoagulation in the same time frame. The primary outcome was proven or highly suspected coagulopathy within 30 days of hospitalization. Results: Definitive coagulopathy has been diagnosed in 3 (3.5%) of 85 LMWH administered patients and 7 (2.13%) of 328 DP + LMWH received patients (P=0.456). Five cases with definitive coagulopathy were not initiated any anticoagulation at the time of the event. The multivariate analysis showed that DP addition to the anticoagulant approach did not have any impact on the risk of demonstrated coagulopathy and highly-suspected coagulopathy. Conclusion: We think that our clinical experience is valuable in showing the real-life results of DP + LMWH treatment in COVID-19. This approach did not affect the coagulopathy rate. Our data did also not document an additive effect of DP in the COVID-19 outcome. Prospective controlled trials would give more convincing results regarding the role of DP in COVID-19 endothelial dysfunction and clinical outcome.

16.
Biomedicine (India) ; 42(3):561-566, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939776

ABSTRACT

Introduction and Aim: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID–19) can cause damage to a wide variety of organs throughout the body, with the lung being its primary focus of attack. The identification of prognostic indicators in COVID-19 can be of assistance in the management of the disease, in instances that are critical or severe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hematological and inflammatory indicators in COVID-19 patients who were hospitalized and determine how closely those markers are associated with the severity of the condition. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional prospective analysis, there were a total of 200 patients diagnosed with COVID-19. The demographic information and comorbidities of the patients were gathered through direct questioning. The indicators of the complete blood count were recorded for every patient. In addition, tests were performed on D-dimer, ferritin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and C reactive protein (CRP). Systemic immune inflammation index (SII) was calculated. The association of demographic and laboratory parameters with patient’s outcome evaluated. Results: After a 30-day follow-up, 32 patients (16%) out of 200 required ICU hospitalization, with eight of them (4%) dying. Each of the following od diabetes (OR=4.2;95 % CI= 1.8-2291, p=0.021), hypertension (OR=3.1, 95 % CI=1.21-19.11, p=0.033), D-dimmer (OR=3.22, 95 % CI=1.43-9.12, p=0.037), ferritin (OR=2.18, 95 % CI=1.4-7.22, p=0.027), NLR (OR=3.26, 95% CI=1.5-7.18, p= 0.023), LDH (OR= 6.23, 95% CI=1.77-22.9, p=0.034), and CRP (OR=4.56, 95% CI=1.32-28.85, p=0.007), were independent risk factors for severity of COVID-19. Conclusion: The comorbidities diabetes and hypertension, as well as the levels of D-dimer, serum ferritin, NLR, LDH, and CRP, could be utilized to predict COVID-19 severity and its outcome.

17.
Journal of the Nepal Medical Association ; 60(251):596-599, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939708

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with COVID-19 are characterised by abnormal levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Elevated D-dimer in COVID-19 patients is associated with increased mortality. This study aimed to find out the prevalence of raised D-dimer among COVID-19 patients in a tertiary care centre. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in COVID-19 unit of a tertiary care centre from 23 January 2021 to 19 June 2021. The ethical approval was taken from the Institutional Review Committee (Reference number: 077/078/159). D-dimer values and demographic data of the hospital-admitted COVID-19 patients were recorded. Convenience sampling technique was used. Point estimate and 95% Confidence Interval were calculated. Results: Out of 180 patients with COVID-19 admitted in the hospital, the D-dimer levels were raised in 85 (47.22%) (39.93-54.51, 95% Confidence Interval) patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of raised D-dimer among admitted COVID-19 patients was found to be lower when compared to other studies conducted in similar settings.

18.
International Journal of Drug Delivery Technology ; 12(2):873-877, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939655

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been documented that the mortality rate in diabetic persons can reach 10%. In addition, it has been shown that the rate of mortality and the need for respiratory support are higher among newly diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus compared with patients known to have diabetes mellitus for a relatively long duration. In the setting of the pandemic of COVID-19, glycemic control for the patients admitted to hospitals is critical, as is diabetes screening to uncover undiagnosed cases. Aim of the study: To explore the possible link between diabetes mellitus and COVID-19 in Iraq Patients and methods: The current research was carried out in Al-Diwaniyah Province, Iraq, in Al-Diwaniyah Teaching Hospital, including the word of medicine, respiratory unit, and intensive care unit. The study started on Sept 15, 2021 and ended on Apr 15, 2022. The study was cross-sectional and included 100 patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 evidenced by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and CT-scan “computed tomography scan of the chest. Those patients were chosen randomly from the pool of patients visiting the teaching hospital. The age range of patients was between 18 and 94 years, with 45 males and 55 females. Laboratory investigation results were retrieved from patients’ records and included random blood sugar, lactate dehydrogenase, d-dimer, HbA1c%, and “C-reactive protein (CRP).” Results: The mean values of age, random blood sugar (RBS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), d-dimer, HbA1c, and HS-CRP were comparable between males and females (p > 0.05). Patients with high HbA1c levels (HbA1c ≥ 6.5%) were older and had significantly higher levels of random blood sugar and d-dimer than patients with HbA1c < 6.5%. The d-dimer level showed a significant positive correlation to RBS, LDH, HbA1c, and HS-CRP (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Higher levels of markers of inflammation were associated with HbA1c levels in the diabetic range, indicating a bi-directional relation between diabetes mellitus and the severity of COVID-19.

19.
KONURALP TIP DERGISI ; 14(1):92-98, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939503

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aims to investigate the relationship between prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), INR (International Normalized Ratio), and D-dimer levels, platelet (PLT) levels at hospital admission, and positivity or negativity of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test results in patients with suspected coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) followed at COVID-19 services. Methods: This study was performed on 238 patients with the prediagnosis of COVID-19, all patients are hospitalised in Samsun city at our hospital between 11 March 2020-30 May 2020. According to COVID-19 PCR test results, PCR test negative 119 individua and PCR test positive 119 patients were included in the study. PT, aPTT, D-dimer, INR, and PLT levels were examined. Results: While PCR test negative individuals had a mean PT value of 11.46 +/- 0.86 sec, PCR test positive patients had a mean PT value of 12.97 +/- 3.65 sec (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in mean aPTT values of PCR test positive and negative patients. Whereas INR, D-dimer increased significantly in PCR test positive patients. PLT value decreased from a mean value of 266.75 +/- 71.36*10(9)/L in PCR test negative patients to 241.18 +/- 96.64*10(9)/L in PCR test positive patients (p=0.002). Conclusions: In our study, it was found that in patients who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 suspicion and followed up in COVID-19 services, PT, D-dimer, INR, PLT values were important in detecting coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia in the group who were PCR positivity.

20.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(6):6769-6779, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939461

ABSTRACT

Background: There are little researches taken discussed the effect of IP-10 and MCP-1 in the coronavirus infection. Therefore, our study mainly aims to estimate whether IP-10 and MCP-1 is associated to disease severity in a samples of Iraqi patients with COVID-19. Methods: The Cross-sectional study included 90 patients infected with covid-19 virus divided in to (45) with severe infection and (45) with mild infection,51 males and 39 females. Serum levels of MCP-1 and IP-10 was measured by sandwich ELISA test. Results: MCP-1 chemokine in severe COVID-19 patients was significantly higher (P=0.000) than in mild patients. Also, IP-10 chemokine showing a higher significant association (P =0.025) with severe patients group. There is a highly significant difference of Oxygen saturation in the distribution of mild and severe patients (P= 0.000). The Computed Tomography, Ferritin and D.dimer showing a higher significant association with severe patients (P=0.000) compared with mild patients. Conclusion: According to the current study the serum levels of Interferon Gamma Induced Protein 10 (IP-10) and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 (MCP-1) showing a significant association with the severe COVID-19 infections.

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