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1.
Emerging Infectious Diseases ; 29(1), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2198448

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and the worldwide COVID- 19 pandemic triggered considerable attention to the emergence and evolution of novel human pathogens. Bourbon virus (BRBV) was first discovered in 2014 in Bourbon County, Kansas, USA. Since its initial discovery, several cases of BRBV infection in humans have been identified in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri. BRBV is classified within the Thogotovirus genus;these negativestrand RNA viruses appear to be transmitted by ticks, and much of their biology remains unknown. In this review, we describe the emergence, virology, geographic range and ecology, and human disease caused by BRBV and discuss potential treatments for active BRBV infections. This virus and other emerging viral pathogens remain key public health concerns and require continued surveillance and study to mitigate human exposure and disease. Copyright © 2023 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All rights reserved.

2.
Folia Oeconomica Stetinensia ; 22(2):209-223, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2198310

ABSTRACT

Research background: Environmental factors are not adequately addressed in organizational ecology studies. At the same time, it is known that the theory has not received enough attention except for North America, which is the emerging point. Purpose: We aim to examine macroeconomic connectedness between the organizational ecology of transportation and storage firms and macroeconomic variables such as price and production indexes. Research methodology: This paper discusses the relation among the following variables within the framework of macroeconomic connectedness via organizational ecology theory. The variables are FOUNDINGS, DISBANDINGS, TRNSP-CPI, PPI IPI and ENERGY. We use the TVP-VAR based Diebold-Yllmaz Connectedness approach in the analysis of the data. Results: DISBANDING is the net transmitter throughout the entire period. FOUNDING is mainly a net shock receiver during the COVID-19 period and transmitter in other periods. TRANS-CPI and PPI are risk receivers throughout the entire period, and even the shocks they transmit increased in the post-2018 period. ENERGY and IPI are in shock receiver status throughout the entire period. The received shocks of IPI from others have decreased with the effect of the lockdown experienced during the COVID-19 period. Novelty: The investors can hedge against risk by looking at industry production capacity and the number of firm closures, considering the net bilateral link between the indices, and calculating the appropriate time period for establishing a firm. Connectedness indices vary considerably over the sampling period, which indicates that investors must dynamically adjust their position in the industry. © 2022 Murathan Tuncer et al., published by Sciendo.

3.
PLOS Sustainability and Transformation ; 1(4), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2197185

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is dramatically impacting planetary and human societal systems that are inseparably linked. Zoonotic diseases like COVID-19 expose how human well-being is inextricably interconnected with the environment and to other converging (human driven) social–ecological crises, such as the dramatic losses of biodiversity, land use change, and climate change. We argue that COVID-19 is itself a social–ecological crisis, but responses so far have not been inclusive of ecological resiliency, in part because the "Anthropause” metaphor has created an unrealistic sense of comfort that excuses inaction. Anthropause narratives belie the fact that resource extraction has continued during the pandemic and that business-as-usual continues to cause widespread ecosystem degradation that requires immediate policy attention. In some cases, COVID-19 policy measures further contributed to the problem such as reducing environmental taxes or regulatory enforcement. While some social–ecological systems (SES) are experiencing reduced impacts, others are experiencing what we term an "Anthrocrush,” with more visitors and intensified use. The varied causes and impacts of the pandemic can be better understood with a social–ecological lens. Social–ecological insights are necessary to plan and build the resilience needed to tackle the pandemic and future social–ecological crises. If we as a society are serious about building back better from the pandemic, we must embrace a set of research and policy responses informed by SES thinking.

4.
2022 OCEANS Hampton Roads, OCEANS 2022 ; 2022-October, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2192045

ABSTRACT

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in coastal and inland waterbodies release toxins which are known to have negative effects on local ecology and public health. Toxins released by Karenia Brevis and other phytoplankton are known to cause fatigue, muscle aches, neurological and respiratory illness in humans after exposure, which match those of COVID-19. A relationship between HABs and COVID virality could help explain the seasonality and unique symptoms in COVID-infections. COVID infection, hospitalization, and ICU usage data in the state of Florida were compared with instances of K. brevis blooms on a state and county basis. Results of correlation analysis indicate that blooms potentially correlated with increased hospitalizations compared to infections on a state-level. County level analysis was inconclusive. Due to broadness and complexity of subject, further investigation is necessary to fully understand how HABs and coastal ecology affect public health and virality of infectious disease. © 2022 IEEE.

5.
Tourism, Recreation and Biological Invasions ; : 97-108, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2186709

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we use our environments locally and nationally, with a dramatic increase in 'staycations' and uptake in recreational activities, particularly utilizing freshwater habitats. There is high demand for accessible, safe and aesthetically pleasing locations for engaging in a range of water-based activities, such as paddlesports, boating and angling. Fresh waters, and the ecosystem services they provide, have increasingly experienced pressure from a range of anthropogenic stressors, including invasive non-native species (INNS). Invasive aquatic plants have significant impacts on freshwater systems, often dominating local environments. They can limit access to and navigation in watercourses and affect other water-based activities, which has consequences for tourism and recreational use. Once introduced, invasive aquatic plants can rapidly establish and spread, therefore biosecurity is essential to minimize the risk of introduction and subsequent impacts and management costs. While many invasive aquatic plants are undesirable for recreation and tourism, pathways of invasion including water-based activities, such as on boating and angling equipment, can spread them. To minimize the impacts of invasive non-native plants felt by those that enjoy the use of freshwater environments for tourism and recreation, collective responsibility should be encouraged to prevent the spread and enhance the management of established invasive aquatic plant populations.

6.
One Health ; 16, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2181973

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of the One Health (OH) approach, which considers the health of humans, animals, and the environment in preventing future pandemics. A wide range of sustainable interdisciplinary collaborations are required to truly fulfill the purpose of the OH approach. It is well-recognized, however, that such collaborations are challenging. In this study, we undertook key-informant interviews with a panel of stakeholders from Japan to identify their perceived needs and challenges related to OH research. This panel included scientists, government officials, journalists, and industry stakeholders. By combining a thematic analysis of these interviews and a literature review, we summarized two key themes pertinent to the effective implementation of OH research: types of required research and systems to support that research. As a techno-logical issue, interviewees suggested the importance of research and development of methodologies that can promote the integration and collaboration of research fields that are currently fragmented. An example of such a methodology would allow researchers to obtain high-resolution metadata (e.g. ecological and wildlife data) with high throughput and then maximize the use of the obtained metadata in research, such as in environmental DNA analysis, database construction, or the use of computational algorithms to find novel viral genomes. In terms of systems surrounding OH research, some interviewees stressed the importance of creating a sustainable research system, such as one that has continuous budget support and allows researchers to pursue their academic careers and interests. These perceptions and challenges held by Japanese stakeholders may be common to others around the world. We hope this review will encourage more researchers and others to work together to create a resilient society against future pandemics.

7.
Global Ecology and Conservation ; : e02388, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2178895

ABSTRACT

Roads pose a major, and growing, challenge for the conservation of endangered species. However, very little is known about how endangered species behaviorally respond to roads and what that means for road mitigation strategies. We used the nation-wide lockdown in Nepal during the COVID-19 pandemic as a natural experiment to investigate how dramatic reductions in traffic volume along the national highway affected movements of two GPS-collared tigers (Panthera tigris)—a globally endangered species. This work is the first systematic research on tigers in Nepal using radiotelemetry or GPS tracking data since the 1980s. We found that the highway more strongly constrained the space use and habitat selection of the male in Parsa National Park than the female in Bardia National Park. Over the entire study period, the female on average crossed 10 times more often per week than the male, and when he was near the highway, he was over 11 times more probable to not cross it than to cross during the day. However, we also found that the cessation of traffic during the pandemic lockdown relaxed tiger avoidance of roads and made the highway more permeable for both animals. They were 2-3 times more probable to cross the highway during the lockdown than before the lockdown. In the month following the lockdown, the space use area of the male tiger tripled in size (160 to 550 km2), whereas the female's shrunk to half its previous size (33 to 15 km2). These divergent patterns likely reflect differences between the two parks in their highway traffic volumes and regulations as well as ecological conditions. Our results provide clear evidence that vehicle traffic on major roads impede tiger movements, but also that tigers can respond quickly to reductions in human pressures. We conclude by identifying various actions to mitigate road impacts on tigers and other endangered species.

8.
COVID-19: Biomedical Perspectives ; 50:27-81, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2167845
9.
Euromentor Journal ; 13(4):58-78, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2167766

ABSTRACT

During the COVID19 pandemics, teaching/learning/testing have undergone lots of changes made for the transition to online classes. Teaching English for Specific Purposes (ESP) online witnessed a paradigm shift and new approaches that were all facilitated by the use of technology have been developed or improved. Pre-pandemics, Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis proposed "reflexive pedagogy" based on the idea that it is not the technology used that matters but the pedagogy itself which makes the difference, so they proposed reflexive pedagogy as opposed to didactic pedagogy which is composed of 7 affordances ranging from ubiquitous learning to differentiated learning with the purpose of moving focus from mimetic learning to epistemic learning via reflection and use of technology. Having this new approach in mind, the present paper attempts to analyse the advantages and disadvantages when teaching English for Specific Purposes. While the advantages are numerous due the possibility to use technology anytime, anywhere, anyhow, there are still certain constraints regarding learning foreign languages which utilize the mimetic approach in certain circumstance. Thus, the study focuses on the activities developed with the students from the University of Bucharest enrolled in the Faculty of Chemistry, approaching a wide range of subjects with a review of reflexive pedagogy in terms of advantages and disadvantages for ESP. While reflexive pedagogy is extensively useful for listening, speaking, reading and learning specialized vocabulary, writing seems to be affected as a way of progressing in learning. As an overall observation, reflexive pedagogy proves quite useful for teaching foreign languages with certain drawbacks.

10.
16th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2022 ; : 1441-1444, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2167242

ABSTRACT

The global policies of inclusive education often ignored local knowledge and cultural-historical ecologies. As a result, the top-down policies become either irrelevant or oppressive. This study presents a formative intervention study, Learning Lab, conducted in Brazil to design a new system at specialized school for blind and visually impaired students. Fourteen practitioners engaged in nine meetings with the final goal of producing a new system of inclusive education for students with multiple disabilities during the COVID-19 Pandemic. We will present the expansive learning actions, which educators took as a conduit for critical dialogue, collective agency and expansive learning for designing the future of their school. © ISLS.

11.
Urban Planning ; 7(4):420-431, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2204407

ABSTRACT

Social infrastructure is made up of various material as well as non-material goods, ranging from venues for leisure such as movie theaters to indispensable everyday commodities, like sidewalks and streets. This is true both for urban and rural areas. However, the increasing emergence of digital aspects of social infrastructure has seemed to go unnoticed to some extent, with research specifically focusing on these digital aspects of social infrastructure being scarce at best- even though digitalization is currently a major emerging meta-development worldwide. The goal of our contribution is therefore to investigate the digital sphere and integrate it into the concept of social infrastructure. Drawing on descriptive findings from a multi-sited, community-based survey of residents in four rural areas in Germany (N = 413) as well as from 40 qualitative interviews, we present an integrative and expanded conceptualization of what we term a tangible dig- ital social infrastructure. To do so, we examine digital neighborly connectedness as a social resource during the Covid-19 pandemic as a case study. We argue that digital neighborly connectedness served as both an integral part of on-site social infrastructure and as a social resource, especially during pandemic times. We discuss our results in light of current research on social infrastructure, with a specific focus on the scope of what counts as social infrastructure, as well as current discourse on social infrastructure in rural areas.

12.
CAMPO TERRITORIO: Revista de Geografia Agraria ; 17(47):130-154, 2022.
Article in Portuguese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2203937

ABSTRACT

During the period of the COVID-19 pandemic and social isolation, the farmers of the 20 de Marco agrarian reform project had to adapt the way they market their products so that it was possible to continue the Agroecological Fair extension project, which was carried at the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS)/Tres Lagoas Campus. In March 2020, with the suspension of on-site activities at the university, the strategy found to maintain sales was the online sales system and home deliveries. The objective of this paper is to present the paths of this action, analyzing how the spatialization of the consumption of agroecological products in the urban fabric of Tres Lagoas during the pandemic period took place. Despite the social commotion that marked this tragic moment in the history of the country, the settled farmers and the UFMS/Tres Lagoas Campus extension project team remained active in carrying out activities that contributed to the success of the spatialization of urban consumption and maintenance of farmers' income, investing in agroecological educational actions on conscious consumption and the importance of agrarian reform.

13.
R Soc Open Sci ; 9(2): 211600, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191257

ABSTRACT

Anticipating cross-species transmission of zoonotic diseases requires an understanding of pathogen infection dynamics within natural reservoir hosts. Although bats might be a source of coronaviruses (CoVs) for humans, the drivers of infection dynamics in bat populations have received limited attention. We conducted a fine-scale 2-year longitudinal study of CoV infection dynamics in the largest colony of Reunion free-tailed bats (Mormopterus francoismoutoui), a tropical insectivorous species. Real-time PCR screening of 1080 fresh individual faeces samples collected during the two consecutive years revealed an extreme variation of the detection rate of bats shedding viruses over the birthing season (from 0% to 80%). Shedding pulses were repeatedly observed and occurred both during late pregnancy and within two months after parturition. An additional shedding pulse at the end of the second year suggests some inter-annual variations. We also detected viral RNA in bat guano up to three months after bats had left the cave. Our results highlight the importance of fine-scale longitudinal studies to capture the rapid change of bat CoV infection over months, and that CoV shedding pulses in bats may increase spillover risk.

14.
Nature ; 612(7938): 9, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2185683
15.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 82: 103376, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2179405

ABSTRACT

The healthcare staff who supported Wuhan's rescue work were the first batch of cross-regional supporters during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. To determine the cultural factors that affected their mental health and resilience, as well as the processes that organizations and individuals underwent to transform cultural resources into benefits. This study collected narrative materials in the form of national and individual statements and used Social Ecology of Resilience theory to analyse them. It identified and analysed the cultural factors of resilience in macrosystems, mesosystems, and microsystems according to four themes, namely: cognition, emotion, will, and behaviour. Altogether, it was found that the national voice adopted an optimistic narrative tone reminiscent of that used during the context of war and that the personal or public voice approved of it. The study revealed that the party and government's use of moral narration derived from its heritage culture and its belief in its continuity in new China's culture served as a mechanism of cultural resilience and mobilisation. The above is the experience of the operation of living culture (LC) and cultural heritage (CH) mentioned in Culture Based Development (CBD). In light of this, it was concluded that the predominant form of cultural input during China's national public health crisis has been storytelling with narrative resilience.

16.
Heliyon ; 8(5): e09449, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2178994

ABSTRACT

Pandemics are global challenges that lead to total disruption of human activities. From the inception of human existence, all pandemics have resulted in loss of human lives. The coronavirus disease caused by SAR-CoV-2 began in China and is now at the global scale with an increase in mortality and morbidity. Numerous anthropogenic activities have been implicated in the emergence and severity of pandemics, including COVID-19. These activities cause changes in microbial ecology, leading to evolution due to mutation and recombination. This review hypothesized that an understanding of these anthropogenic activities would explain the dynamics of pandemics. The recent coronavirus model was used to study issues leading to microbial evolution, towards preventing future pandemics. Our review highlighted anthropogenic activities, including deforestation, mining activities, waste treatment, burning of fossil fuel, as well as international travels as drivers of microbial evolution leading to pandemics. Furthermore, human-animal interaction has also been implicated in pandemic incidents. Our study recommends substantial control of such anthropogenic activities as having been highlighted as ways to reduce the frequency of mutation, reduce pathogenic reservoirs, and the emergence of infectious diseases.

17.
Revue forestière française ; 72(6):491-503, 2020.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2155985

ABSTRACT

The economic impact of the worldwide Covid health crisis and the faster decline of forests have led to a 14% decrease of the turnover of wood from publicly owned forests Wood prices decreased by 10% on average, and by 17% for spruce, with more wood infested by bark beetles than in 2019 Beech, fir, Scots pine and even oak suffered from this third hot year in a row, with severe drought in summer All sales by submission have been done using an upgradable online selling tool since January 2020 In addition, supply contracts are increasing steadily, and represent 35% of the volumes.

18.
Berichte uber Landwirtschaft ; 100(2), 2022.
Article in German | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2155817

ABSTRACT

This study quantified the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic for the agricultural sector and derived long-term options to make agricultural and forestry enterprises more resilient. Almost one in five farm households had at least one person affected by a SARS-CoV-2 infection by March 2021. The psychological stress in farming families was comparable to that in the population as a whole. Economically, negative impacts of the pandemic clearly outweighed the positive ones, with large differences among farm sectors. Around one in four farms considered strategic changes in consequence of the Corona crisis, with direct marketing being the most frequent strategy in this context. Austrian farmers consider their farms quite crisis-proof, although they heavily depend on public funds and respondents rated their cuts as the greatest potential threat. Finally, the study suggests that the impact of the Corona crisis on Austrian agriculture and forestry was still manageable, at least until March 2021, and motivated farmers to make isolated adjustments only.

19.
Global Perspectives ; 2(1), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2154372

ABSTRACT

This essay argues for the need for research into multispecies relations at the intersection between international political economy, ecology, and disease emergence. It draws attention to the conditions of intensive agribusiness and modern livestock, which alter human-animal-microbe relations, facilitating the emergence of infectious diseases such as the case of mink farms and COVID-19. It also highlights the impact of infection on animals and farming economies. Through a discussion of the ways anthropogenic activities have historically changed the kinds, scale, and spread of human disease, the essay concludes with an appeal to rethink international political economy.

20.
International Journal of Doctoral Studies ; 17:161-180, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2146281

ABSTRACT

Aim/Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown required doctoral writers to demonstrate resiliency to continue their culminating projects. This study examines the socioecological factors that fostered that resiliency. Background Resiliency is a key factor in determining whether doctoral writers continue with their culminating projects. Thus far, studies on doctoral student experiences during the pandemic have yet to investigate doctoral students’ adaptive strategies to continue with their projects. Methodology The qualitative study uses in-depth interviews to document the narrative journeys of four research participants pre-pandemic and in-pandemic. Those narratives are analyzed using an infectious disease resilience framework as a metaphor to highlight the resilience within each participant’s writing ecology. Contribution The study seeks to reframe the approach to doctoral writing beyond the individual student toward a broader ecological system to better serve those students and the knowledge produced, regardless of a disruptive crisis. Findings The disruptions that the four participants experienced are documented through their narratives. The participants described their coping strategies related to their workspace, technology, loss of connection, and their breaking point. Recommendations The resilience shown by the four participants demonstrates areas where institufor Practitioners tions can provide assistance to alleviate the pressures placed on doctoral writers. Reframing the dissertation writing process as a socioecological system rather than a cognitive one allows for solutions to problems that are not limited to individual writers. Recommendations Extending the socioecological systems metaphor, further research should invesfor Researchers tigate other stakeholders in a writer’s ecology to obtain different perspectives on a particular system. Impact on Society The pandemic has presented an opportunity for educational institutions to reassess how they can cultivate students’ resilience to positively impact their socioecological balance. Future Research It would be worthwhile to document the post-pandemic experiences of doctoral writers to find out how they seek balance in their ecology as they continue to deal with the post-pandemic fallout. © 2022 Informing Science Institute. All rights reserved.

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