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1.
Global Oils & Fats: Business Magazine ; 18(4):28-32, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1958437

ABSTRACT

This article looks at the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the global palm oil market as well as the post-pandemic outlook for the market. It is indicated that, in the long-term, the post-pandemic outlook for the palm oil industry remains bright. Since the last quarter of 2019, palm oil supply and demand are back in balance, while stocks are declining. Prices have been relatively high for most of 2020 and 2021. Also discussed are the proven benefits of palm oil and the opportunity of the palm oil sector to achieve UN goals.

2.
Scientific Papers Series Management, Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development ; 22(2):543-550, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1958247

ABSTRACT

Animal health and diseases have a major impact on human health and behaviour (i.e. zoonosis, schools, communication etc), food production (African Swine Fever), economy (direct and indirect costs) and trade (export, import, intercommunity trade). Even almost all countries have implemented all kind of management measures, humanity still face up today huge problems, for example the most recent experience, being COVID-19, which ceased almost all human activities in the world and changed people behaviour for several years (2019 up today). For this reason, the paper represents a systemic review of recent information on different management indicators developed - epidemiological/economic etc in order to assist managers (politically, authorities, farmers, all the people involved) to prevent, survey and control such diseases, to develop best practices for benchmarking their country health systems/farm management system etc, and finally to led to an effective and efficient management of infectious disease in livestock during crisis. In this regard, the retrospective method was used and the information reviewed was collected from the latest information published between 2019-2022, available on WHO, Economic Impact, CDC websites, where through a tremendous and collaborative effort across different public health organisations, scientists in the world, dashboards and standard indicators publicly available have been developed. The results of this study demonstrate that the managers of livestock during crisis, the competent authorities, the governments have to consider, undertake and include these kind of tools/indicators in their management in order to assist them to develop their emergency preparedness capacity and to manage in an effective way the infectious diseases during crisis respectively prevention, early detection, rapid response, identifying their vulnerabilities etc.

3.
Partners in Research for Development ; 4:18-19, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1957982

ABSTRACT

It is reported that the rapid, targeted partnership response from the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) is supporting research projects that build resilience and respond to challenges the COVID-19 pandemic has presented to agriculture in partner countries. The ACIAR Alumni Research Support Facility (ARSF) has supported 66 alumni to undertake research to help with the pandemic recovery. Starting in 2020 and continuing in 2021, the ARSF projects cover a range of topics designed to address issues of importance to communities in the partner countries.

4.
The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy ; 42(7/8):712-726, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1948681

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The purposes of this paper are to: (1) characterize farmers’ market manager and vendor perceptions of the economic, social and environmental impact markets have on their local communities;and (2) how those impacts are tracked and communicated to market actors and the local community.Design/methodology/approach>Twenty-nine semistructured interviews were conducted with market managers and vendors across four farmers’ markets within Michigan. The interviews were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis.Findings>Managers and vendors report economic and social and environmental benefits associated with the presence of a farmers' market, consistent with the existing literature. Metrics are tracked to estimate market impact, particularly economic and social benefits. Market managers reported uncertainty about how best to use data internally, and there are gaps in communicating market impacts with vendors. Most data are used for external reporting, to statewide organizations or for grant evaluation. Respondents reported data fatigue and unwillingness among vendors to share personal business information due to concerns about privacy relative to the perceived benefits of sharing data.Practical implications>Additional resources are needed for markets, specifically market managers, to better utilize the data they collect for internal versus external purposes.Originality/value>Metric collection and reporting are a nascent development among markets. Understanding how market actors are utilizing these tools will provide guidance to improve future efforts at impact measurement.

5.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1042(1):012019, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1948114

ABSTRACT

A study is presented on the economic and environmental impacts, due to the reduction of electricity consumption in a Technical High School in Manzanillo, Mexico, during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the impacts generated by the reduction of student mobility. This research shows an analysis of the reduction of electrical energy consumption, the reduction of monthly economic costs and CO2 emissions in the studied institution, these impacts on student mobility during confinement between November 2019 and October 2021 are also analyzed. Results show electrical energy savings of approximately 60MWh during this period, about 34 TnCO2 and an economic saving of 8654 USD. It has also estimated an economic saving in student mobility of approximately 312,840 USD and a reduction in emissions of the order of 64 TnCO2. This research also suggests the implementation of technologies that use renewable energy sources as a strategy in the face of this health emergency and contributes to raising future scenarios for sustainable energy planning.

6.
POST-PANDEMIC SUSTAINABLE TOURISM MANAGEMENT: The New Reality of Managing Ethical and Responsible Tourism ; : 55-67, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1935214
7.
Aesthetic Plast Surg ; 2022 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physician relationships with industry and subsequent financial implications has not been previously assessed. The aim of this study is to compare pre- and post-COVID-19 payments between industry and medical providers for all plastic surgeons. METHODS: Payment information was collected for the 2019 and 2020 reporting periods from the Open Payments Program (OPP) database for plastic surgeons and plastic surgeon subspecialists. An analysis was performed of trends and comparison of payments for each year for all plastic surgeons and each subspecialty cohort. RESULTS: For all plastic surgeons, there was a decrease in industry payments between 2019 and 2020 (- 30.5%). All plastic surgery subspecialties had a decrease in payments with general plastic and reconstructive surgery affected the most (- 56%) and craniofacial surgery affected the least (- 9%). Payments for almost all categories for plastic surgeons decreased along with compensation as faculty or as speakers. Total charitable contributions and grant payments increased by 61 and 273%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Analysis of industry-physician payments available through the Sunshine Act shows that the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted industry payments to plastic surgery and its subspecialties. While this study demonstrates the economic impact of the current pandemic, only time will tell whether these trends will persist in the coming years. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE V: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

8.
J Fam Econ Issues ; 43(2): 205-212, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1942276

ABSTRACT

A growing body of research demonstrates that COVID-19 has had a profound impact on family functioning and well-being in a range of countries. The fear and uncertainty of the health risks, in addition to the stress from ensuing restrictions and constraints on everyday life caused major disruptions, impacting the financial, emotional, and physical well-being of adults and children alike. In this report, we summarize the current literature on the impact of COVID-19 disruption to family functioning and economic well-being as a context for this special issue. Our findings indicate that while the pandemic may have caused a reallocation of intra-familial tasks, a large gender disparity remains regarding the proportion of domestic work and childcare. The pandemic disproportionally impacted lower-income families, families from ethnic minority and vulnerable groups, and women. Finally, the financial impacts of the emergence in Spring of 2020 have strained family relationships, although the effects depend to a large extent on quality of the relationships and family well-being before COVID-19. To address the long-term bidirectional effects of the pandemic on family well-being and the well-being of the global economy calls for research that crosses disciplinary divides.

9.
ACTA STRUCTILIA ; 29(1):141-162, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939519

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted on many economic sectors globally. The regressed economic environment exacerbated its effects on the construction industry, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. The article presents an evaluation of the impact of COVID-19 on the construction sector, focusing on the construction delivery methods in South Africa. The effect of COVID-19 was evaluated against the South African Council for Project and Construction Management Professions (SACPCMP)'s project life cycle framework. A mixed data-collection method was used for the study. Literature was consulted, and empirical data was collected through focused online panel discussions and structured questionnaires administered through online polls. This article presents the results as effect and frequency of issues arising from COVID-19, industry projections, and recommendations on sustainability. Findings showed a general hold on original investment decisions by clients, in both the public and private sectors;increased professional services' scope of works, and increased health and safety compliance requirements, together resulting in higher costs.

10.
Technological and Economic Development of Economy ; 0(0):1-21, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939086

ABSTRACT

Quantifying the shock to the economy from the COVID-19 pandemic is difficult. Although this shock is easily linked to financial markets as a sort of monetary shock, few studies have been done on its effect on the real economy. This study takes a particular economic perspective, focusing on electricity uses in various sectors of the economy. We propose a novel method for comparing electricity use in 2019Q1 and 2020Q1, based on which we derive the degree of the real shock to some important economic sectors from COVID-19. In our theoretical framework, demand for energy and its influencing factors are related to the total scale of the economy, i.e., the gross domestic product. Using suitable empirical methods, we obtain certain marginal effects and then calculate the corresponding ratio as the real shock from COVID-19. The ratio between these marginal effects reveals the need for a balance between stocks and the corresponding differences in the economy. In our cases, the electricity use in various economic sectors plays a role in both stocks and the differences. We find that, although manufacturing and consumption are affected, the services are more vulnerable to the shock from the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings offer implications for policymakers.

11.
Jurnal Agribisnis Indonesia ; 10(1):76-84, 2022.
Article in Indonesian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1934941

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic brings around a multidimensional crisis that sway the world's economy and believed to affect the performance of any industry. Cocoa processing industry, which is well known greatly contributes to Indonesia's economy, is one of industry that is suspected has a significant effect to the performance of Indonesia's economy. As one of export commodity, during the pandemic (2019-2020) the cocoa processing industry contributed for about USD 548 million to total Indonesia's foreign exchange. This lead to a question: does the increase implies that the cocoa processing industry has a good financial performance? Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the financial performance of two cocoa processing company before and during Covid-19 pandemic by occupying the financial report of PT Bumi Teknokultura Unggul TBK and PT Wahana Interfood Nusantara from 2018 till 2020. The Economic Value Added approach was used to evaluate the financial performance of both company. The result of Economic Value Added (EVA) Analysis confirmed that this pandemic seem affecting the financial performance of the two company, which is both company's performance tend to decrease. Yet, a different performance between the two was depicted as well by EVA, in which the EVA of PT Wahana Interfood Nusantara is positive while the PT Bumi Teknokultura Unggul Tbk's is negative. This implies that PT Wahana Interfood Nusantara has a better financial performance than PT Bumi Teknokultura Unggul Tbk.

12.
Contabilidad y Negocios ; 17(33):57-76, 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1934801

ABSTRACT

En el presente trabajo, se analiza la incidencia en Perú de las recomendaciones brindadas por la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE) en su Guía sobre las implicancias de la pandemia del COVID-19 en los precios de transferencia (Guidance on the transfer pricing implications of the COVID-19 pandemic), publicada el 18 de diciembre de 2020. Este documento representa la perspectiva en consenso de los más de 137 miembros del Marco Inclusivo de BEPS, entre los que se encuentra Perú. La investigación se centra en la aplicación del principio de libre concurrencia para problemas generados o exacerbados por la pandemia. En particular, se analiza la problemática del análisis de comparabilidad en un escenario de carencia de transacciones y empresas comparables de información del ejercicio 2020 y periodos siguientes afectados por la pandemia. Igualmente, se aborda el tema de las pérdidas desde dos perspectivas: como transacción o empresa comparable, y como la generación de pérdidas en los modelos de negocios de riesgo limitado. Se concluye que varias de las medidas recomendadas por el Marco Inclusivo pueden materializarse a través de la flexibilización y apertura de la administración tributaria en las fiscalizaciones. No obstante, permitir la modificación del análisis de los precios de transferencia reflejado en el reporte local en función a información de transacciones y empresas comparables obtenida con posterioridad requiere la emisión de una norma legal que no condicione la declaración rectificatoria a la verificación de la SUNAT, y que suspenda la aplicación de infracciones y sanciones por la declaración de datos y cifras falsos.Alternate :This paper analyzes the incidence in our country of the recommendations provided by the OECD in its Guide on the implications of the COVID-19 Pandemic on transfer pricing Guidance on the transfer pricing implications of the COVID-19 pandemic published on December 18, 2020 and which represents the consensus perspective of the more than 137 members of the BEPS Inclusive Framework, among which is Peru, regarding the application of the arm's length principle for problems generated or exacerbated by the pandemic. In particular, the problem of comparability analysis is evaluated in a scenario of lack of comparable transactions and companies in the 2020 and subsequent years affected by the pandemic. Likewise, the issue of losses is addressed from two perspectives, those as a comparable result and the generation of losses in business models with limited risk. It is concluded that several of the measures recommended by the Inclusive Framework can be materialized through the flexibility and openness of the Tax Administration in audits;however, allowing the modification of the transfer pricing analysis reflected in the Local Report based on information of comparable companies obtained later requires the issuance of a legal norm that does not condition the rectifying return to the verification of SUNAT and temporarily avoid the application of infractions and sanctions for the declaration of false data.Alternate :Este artigo analisa a incidência em nosso país das recomendações fornecidas pela Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE) em seu Guia sobre as implicações da Pandemia COVID-19 sobre preços de transferência "Orientações sobre as implicações dos preços de transferência da pandemia COVID-19" publicado em 18 de dezembro de 2020 e que representa a perspectiva consensual dos mais de 137 membros do Marco Inclusivo BEPS, entre os quais está o Peru, a respeito da aplicação do princípio da livre concorrência para os problemas gerados ou agravados pela pandemia. Em particular, o problema da análise de comparabilidade é analisado em um cenário de falta de transações e empresas de informações comparáveis em 2020 e anos subsequentes afetados pela pandemia. Da mesma forma, a questão das perdas é tratada sob duas perspectivas, a de uma transação ou empresa comparável e a da geração de perdas em modelos de negócios com risco limitado. Conclui-se que várias das medidas preconizadas pelo Marco Inclusivo podem ser materializadas através da flexibilidade e abertura da Administração Tributária nas auditorias;No entanto, permitir a modificação da análise dos preços de transferência refletidos no Relatório Local com base em informações sobre transações e empresas comparáveis obtidas posteriormente requer a emissão de norma legal que não condicione a declaração retificativa à verificação da SUNAT e que supenda a aplicação de infrações e sanções para a declaração de dados e números falsos.

13.
Media and Communication ; 10(2):276-286, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1934776

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 crisis and its aftermath challenged economies and societal sectors globally. Refugees in developing countries are particularly vulnerable to the socio-economic impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic. In Uganda, refugees significantly compose the marginalized urban population, dependent largely on the informal sector, and are severely affected by the crisis amidst limited social protection interventions. This article draws on key informant interviews with refugees and refugee-led organizations to examine the diverse ways through which social capital within refugees and host communities in Kampala enabled and shaped digitally mediated responses to sustain livelihoods, social wellbeing, and access to information and economic resources in the wake of the pandemic. The findings indicate that digitally enabled and mediated social networks and/or connections through bonds, bridges, and links are crucial in supporting refugees to cope with crisis effects. Networks of friends, families, and institutions are sustained by digital spaces that support the everyday lives of urban refugees through communication, social protection, livelihood continuity and recovery, and service improvisation during and after the crisis. The fragmented digital infrastructure, digital divide, limited government support, language barrier, and circulation of fake news challenged the utility of digital social networks in mobilizing support for refugees during the crisis. Digital technologies offer opportunities to strengthen social support and potentially mobilize refugee livelihoods in cities with fluid programs for displaced communities. The best practices around sustained multi-platform communications, technological innovations, data collection, and robust community engagement should be leveraged to garner the opportunities offered by technologies towards stimulating inclusive crisis responses.

14.
Economie Rurale ; 380:27-39, 2022.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1934321

ABSTRACT

The crisis linked to the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the French fishing industry through market disruptions, both on the supply and on the demand sides. This article focuses on the measurement of impacts of these disruptions on the fish auction markets, considering regional and local dimensions. Fish auction markets are part of regional systems along each coastline of metropolitan France. At the local scale, they are differentiated with respect to the specialisation of products offered for first-sale. The measurement of impacts of the health crisis on these markets relate to the adaptation behaviour of fishers at regional and local scales. It is through the complementary nature of marketing channels that fishers can find solutions to future shocks.

15.
Water ; 14(13):1992, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1934273

ABSTRACT

Hydroelectric projects are often pursued on the promise of economic development and environmental co-benefits as a source of low-carbon energy. We analyse the case of the Muskrat Falls hydropower mega-project (located in Labrador, Canada) to understand why this project failed to live up to its promised benefits, but instead delivered a double disaster of economic cost and environmental risk. The key concepts of anti-reflexivity and deep stories help us understand why the project assumed an aura of inevitability in political and public discourse until it was too late to change course. Drawing on publicly available data and secondary sources, we identify the constellation of social forces that maintained political anti-reflexivity about the economic and environmental risks of the project and led to a double economic and environmental disaster. Our analysis identifies vital lessons for countering anti-reflexivity and improving environmental governance related to energy mega-projects.

16.
Sustainability ; 14(13):7648, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1934220

ABSTRACT

Under the goal of a “new development pattern”, it is of great practical significance to accurately identify the economic growth effect of fiscal and tax policies. This paper constructs a TVP-FAVAR model to measure the economic effects of China’s fiscal and tax policies at the aggregate and structural levels. The results show that the reduction in total tax has a positive effect on real variables such as output and consumption;especially at the present stage, the promotion effect of total tax reduction on economic growth is relatively strong, but the stimulation effect on price is relatively weak. Further, the tax structure in which the ratio of direct tax to total tax increases and the ratio of indirect tax to total tax decreases is more conducive to the increase in output and consumption, and will not strongly stimulate the rise of price level. Therefore, at this stage, China should continue to vigorously implement the tax reduction policy and ensure the continuity of the tax reduction policy. At the same time, we should continue to optimize the tax structure and give better play to the regulatory role of fiscal and tax policies in income redistribution, so as to achieve the goal that fiscal and tax policies help build a “new development pattern” and promote high-quality economic development.

17.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604854, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933949

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the economic impact of border closure and social distancing by estimating the decline of gross domestic product (GDP) in Kenya, Singapore and Thailand. Methods: We analysed secondary data retrospectively. To calculate impact of NPIs on GDP, the relationship between GDP and stock market index was examined using ordinary least squares (OLS). Then, autoregressive and moving averages (ARMA) model was used to examine the impact of NPI on stock market index. The change in GDP due to NPIs was derived by multiplying coefficients of OLS and ARMA models. Results: An increase in stock market index correlated with an increase in GDP, while both social distancing and border closure negatively correlated with stock market index. Implementation of NPIs correlated with the decline in GDP. Thai border closure had a greater decline in GDP than social distancing; Kenya exhibited the same trends; Singapore had the opposite trend. Conclusion: We quantified the magnitude of economic impact of NPIs in terms of GDP decline by linking stock market index and GDP. This approach may be applicable in other settings.


Subject(s)
Retrospective Studies , Humans , Kenya , Singapore , Thailand
18.
Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning ; 33(2):160-170, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1933446

ABSTRACT

When the COVID-19 pandemic caused businesses to close and triggered high unemployment in 2020, millions of unbanked U.S. households, those without a bank account, had to wait for weeks and months for their stimulus checks to arrive. The delayed delivery of stimulus checks issued by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act sheds light on the critical role that safe, affordable financial services and products play in people’s ability to cope with financial shocks. Dialogues over banking practices have been framed with a banked-unbanked dichotomous framework that masks more nuanced understandings of households’ financial realities, including the underbanked, who use a bank account and alternative financial services simultaneously. Using data from the 2015 National Financial Capability Study, this study identifies and compares predictors of being underbanked and unbanked, respectively. We found that the underbanked group is a sizable, distinctively different group. Income volatility and welfare benefit receipt are both associated with being underbanked rather than unbanked. Our findings call for expanding the current, limited framework to gain more complete, nuanced understandings of banking practices.

19.
Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning ; 33(2):228-242, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1933445

ABSTRACT

In this article, we projected household financial vulnerability in the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a nationally representative sample of households from the 2017 Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), we analyzed potential changes in financial status in the pandemic resulting from loss of income and savings from discretionary consumption. We provided a ranking of household groups by their financial vulnerability and the first estimate of the number of households at various degrees of financial vulnerability. Our study showed that a substantial part of the universal stimulus payments was made to households that had sufficient income to cover basic needs and those saved by reducing discretionary expenses. For the most financially vulnerable, the first one-time stimulus payment was too little and too late to help with their financial difficulties. Our findings shed light on to whom and in what form the US government should direct financial assistance during the pandemic.

20.
SSRN; 2021.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-340059

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of Covid-19 has not only changed the life style of billions of persons in the world but also severely disturbed their livelihood. Travel ban and business restrictions has frozen the movement of people, changed the occupational status and consumption pattern of people in almost every country. India is leading country to supply labour ( around 18 million ) in the world and top remittances receiving country globally from 2008 to 2020-21 and Saudi Arabia is third largest remittances source country in the world. The oil boom of 1970s in the Gulf countries increased the demand for unskilled and semiskilled labour. Majority of the skilled or semi-skilled labour were supplied to the Gulf countries from southern state of India like Kerala or Tamil Nadu and unskilled or semi-skilled labour had been supplied from northern states of India like Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. The migrants or the refugees in any society agonized the most during any pandemic, hence it is essential to analyze the economic impact of Indian emigrants in Saudi Arabia during the Coronavirus disease. This study is quantitative in nature and based on both primary and secondary data. The sample of 100 unskilled or semi-skilled labour were collected through a structured questionnaire. 60 samples of migrants from Uttar Pradesh and 40 samples of migrants from Bihar were collected through multi-stage sampling technique in the month of March-April 2021. The study has confirmed that remittances and earnings of the migrants had been negatively affected during COVID-19. The loss of earnings and spread of Coronavirus in their native place had a severe mental impact on the migrants. Chi square test result confirms that there is a significant difference of feeling nervous, depress and lonely across the different states of origin of the migrants.

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